stereorob

Help! just picked up a 1950 Caddy and im clueless!!

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And if you do attempt to rebuild the brakes yourself, leave one side untouched while you do the other. That way you will have a reference to examine if needed. An old hippie mechanic friend taught me that one years ago while ol' hip' still lived.  R.I.P., Hippie Jim.  I miss you terribly.     -    Cadillac 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

What a great car! Lot of good advice, especially about getting manuals, doing research and only doing one repair at a time. IMO the FIRST thing to do is make a checklist in prioritized order of what is needed, safety items like tires and brakes at the top. Because the car has been sitting outside unused for so long, all fluids and filters should be changed, everything should be lubricated and an engine tuneup should be included. As you work through the list you will find other things pop up that will be added to the list. Run and drive it as much as you can once the safety items are done and the use will improve the feel of the car. Good luck with it.

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On 6/30/2020 at 5:15 PM, The 55er said:

The Hydramatic transmission fluid level can be checked from inside the car. Pull back the passenger side floor mat and you will find an access cover on the side of the transmission hump that looks like this. Lift the dipstick out and check the fluid level. If you got an owner's manual with the car the checking procedure will be explained in there.

IMG_2530.JPG

CORRECT !!!!

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On 7/2/2020 at 2:45 AM, C Carl said:

And if you do attempt to rebuild the brakes yourself, leave one side untouched while you do the other. That way you will have a reference to examine if needed. An old hippie mechanic friend taught me that one years ago while ol' hip' still lived.  R.I.P., Hippie Jim.  I miss you terribly.     -    Cadillac 

CORRECT - One thing at a time.

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Congrats on acquiring  the beautiful old car, stereorob. You've previously owned an old car, so I think you're aware of the prime directive when addressing issues on vehicles that are drivers and NOT restoration projects: start with the simplest solution first, then work down (or up, depending on your perspective.) Thinking of your overheating problem in this respect. Are there signs of it overheating besides a high temp reading on the gauge? Is the gauge newer or an old factory unit? Don't presume any old original factory gauge to be accurate.

 

Regardless, it wouldn't hurt to first flush the system with Thermocure by Evaporust...or better yet replace the existing coolant with standard Evaporust and leave it in there a week or two. The standard stuff takes longer than Thermocure, but it won't harm any marginal seals etc. Be sure and run the car several times while the stuff is in it.

 

Then, before trying to fix any presumed problems with the cooling system, drain the Evaporust and replace with coolant or (temporarily) with water...and buy a decent mechanical temp gauge and mount under dash. It might be very illuminating  to find out the temperature your engine is actually running at.

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When diagnosing a heating problem a laser thermometer can be a big help. It allows you to check temp at the engine outlet to the rad, at the back of the engine, lower rad hose, and various spots on the radiator. If there are cool spots on the rad it indicates clogged tubes in that area.

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