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Can anyone help with photos/explanations how the rear gas line routes over to the tank connection, as originally installed from the factory?  50 years ago my dad and I replaced the rusty gas line with copper, and just clamped on a rubber flex hose near the tank.  Now that I have cleaned things up and installed new mounts and frame insulators,  would like to install the gas line over to the tank with proper rigid tubing/hose, hardware, routing location, etc., to match the original install as close as possible.  Is it rigid tubing all the way to the tank connection, with no rubber involved?   What connection hardware is used going into the tank- single flared fitting like brake lines- I assume?  I imagine the rigid line goes thru the two holes in the brace above the rubber axle bumper (routed separate from the wiring)?  From there does it route 1)over to the tank mounted on the front side of the frame cross member using clamp and bolt hole shown in photo? Or 2) does tubing continue on into the center of the frame cross member and make the 90 degree turn over to the tank inside the cross member?  Or 3) do you route tubing all the way thru to the back side of the cross member and mount the tubing to the back side of the cross member over to the tank?  I think maybe 3), because then clear of any moving spring/axle parts as they bounce up and down?  Any photos or help appreciated! Thx, Paul

108256226_RearGasFlexLine4C_LI.thumb.jpg.db3fdf68e66456170722c97a39f5ccc6.jpg

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I had inquired of Classic Tube where I got my new stainless steel brake lines for my '41 Zephyr as to the availability of new gas lines.  They told me they didn't have them in their line of supplies, but they could replicate your old ones if you had them available.  Certainly copper tubing isn't what should be used, but if you could locate some original tubing from that period you could renew the lines and hoses. Try some of the suppliers listed in the Club's website.   Another important element is the gas tank.  It can fill with corrosion and such and create issues with the fuel supply to the engine. Cleaning it out off the vehicle and having a good coating put in it will help.  There are aftermarket fuel tanks but expensive.  I wanted a stainless steel tank but that's a modification that alters the vehicle and most don't have the baffles in them that keeps the tank noise in check.   A good fuel filter is certainly necessary to keep junk out of the carb and intake.  I have one just below my fuel pump on the engine.  Also the electric fuel pump is needed at times to get the fuel to the engine as those old mechanical pumps has issues.  Mine in in line with the fuel line about half way between the tank and engine.  

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The correct fuel line is copper coated steel. Narraganset Reproductions is where I bought the line for my 40 Merc. Third Generations Automotive is supposed to have the correct line. Other vendors sell a copper plated line that soon rusts.

 

https://thirdgenauto.com/

 

I am not sure about the Zephyr and Continental, but the other Ford products, the line was one piece from the firewall to the tank and it was run inside the frame from the tank to the front of the car. It should exit the frame as close to front of the tank as possible and then run along the tank to the fitting. There should be a flexible line between the fuel pump and the tank line. Get a USA made line as the China made lines fitting is too long to allow the line to seat properly. The tank connection originally used a double flare, but many cars have been put together with a compression fitting at the tank and the fire wall. There are 5 clips to hold the line to the frame.

 

If anyone notices incorrect information in this post, please correct it.

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  • 2 months later...

IMHO you should not use a rubber hose on the suctions side of the fuel pump. The fuel pump has to lift the fuel about 12" and rubber hose connections tend to loosen and leak vacuum. This shows up when the car has sat for a while (4-7 days) and you cannot get it started without priming the carburetor.

 

The flex line from the tank line to the fuel pump does not use the worm gear clamps and will stay tight after many years of use.

 

The Ford products of the 1930's and 1940's are mounted high on the engine and do not have the pressure of the fuel in the tank to help lift the fuel to the carburetor, so any weakness in the supply side will show up as hard starting after sitting.

 

My 40 Merc was in the body shop from mid April until late July without being started. It took about 20 seconds to get enough fuel into the carburetor to start it.

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