29 Chandler

Valve clearance setting- Cold

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The manual for our 1914 Chandler says to set the valves hot with a .004"

 

To properly access the valves I need to take out the generator and starter to have free access to that side the engine. I am wondering if I can adjust for the temperature and set them with a larger cold setting?

 

I just put in new valves and set them all at a cold setting of .006". The car started up and ran smoothly but after it warmed up did not have much power. So it's back in the garage for some fine tuning.

 

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Helllo,  The next time you have the engine warmed up, Do a compression check and check the spark timing.  This will be a good start for your lack of power.

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I have basically the same motor 1919 and wondered the same. You can't gain access fast enough with all that needs to be removed.

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Would it be possible to take off the starter and generator and start with a hand crank? If not it may be necessary to push or tow to start.

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On 6/28/2020 at 8:24 PM, 29 Chandler said:

 

I just put in new valves and set them all at a cold setting of .006". The car started up and ran smoothly but after it warmed up did not have much power. So it's back in the garage for some fine tuning.

 

 

A good rule of thumb on a set-up like that is 0.010 intake and 0.013 exhaust.  0.006 cold on the exhaust is really pushing the envelope but I'll bet when it was running that it was quiet!

 

 

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Thanks for the responses guys. I was told by another friend with many years of experience the same info that W_Higgins has suggested.

 

I plan to set them all cold to the measurements listed above. While I am in there there is also an adjustment on the #12 valve that regulates fuel pressure. At the moment it is down to 1/2 psi, down from 1 psi. The factory manual with a stock carb is 1.5 psi. It's going to get bumped up a bit.

 

Eric have you done a compression check on your 1919? At the moment I am getting 30 cold and 40 hot on all six cylinders. Even though I know there are lot of factors that affect compression curious to know what you are getting as I have not found the recommended figure for our engines. My friend told me on our light six 40 was a good number and consistent across all cylinders.

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The two era reference books that I have that list Chandler don't list a compression reading.  I take it that you're cranking by hand?  I wouldn't want to see it much under 50 p.s.i., but if cranking by hand you can expect that it would be higher when running, so that's probably alright, especially if it starts easy.  Balance is as important as anything.  Don't run it again until you have the valves reset.  If they are hanging open you risk burning them.

 

How does your #12 valve regulate fuel pressure?

 

  

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3 hours ago, W_Higgins said:

The two era reference books that I have that list Chandler don't list a compression reading.  I take it that you're cranking by hand?  I wouldn't want to see it much under 50 p.s.i., but if cranking by hand you can expect that it would be higher when running, so that's probably alright, especially if it starts easy.  Balance is as important as anything.  Don't run it again until you have the valves reset.  If they are hanging open you risk burning them.

 

How does your #12 valve regulate fuel pressure?

 

  

Here is a picture of the plunger attached to the #12 valve that maintains the air pressure in the fuel line while the engine is running. There is a hand pump on the dash to get you going.

 

As for cranking, while I can hand crank it its much easier to use the Westinghouse starter. With the primer cups open on the other five cylinders there is not much strain on the starter motor.

 

Today I adjusted air pressure back up to the recommended 1.5 psi, next will be to adjust the valves.

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Ah, I see, it's like a Cadillac.  I didn't realize Chandler's used air pressure.  With a Cadillac, at least, when the fuel system is all sorted out they are a very consistent and reliable delivery system.

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