Linus Tremaine

any opinions on this car that is for sale near me?

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considering going to see this. The person responsible for its restoration is dead and the seller who is a broker knows nothing about it and the family knows nothing about it beyond what is stated in the ad. Possibly a great car, but no proof of any work done or any history. 

 

https://forums.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/studebaker/special-six/2364184.html?fbclid=IwAR2FFxagdkIw5rOOfoH3O3SxW3NcEhU3iirzS5lmppCq6At9RV2fbtRngjg

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

The car is nicely restored but it is not a Special Six. It is a cast head light six.

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Definitely a Light Six. Looks like a decent enough job in the restoration. If you wanted a car to show, there are a number of non-correct items but if you are wanting a good looking car to enjoy and drive it’s nice. A bit on the high end for price though. My Light Six is close to a 400 point car and I’m not sure I could get that for it. The nickel era cars just don’t bring much these days. The disc wheel option is a plus.

 

As for what to expect as far as driving it.... Although well balanced, it is a splash lubricated engine so it doesn’t like to be pushed to high rpms but they cruise nicely up to 45 mph. It only has rear wheel brakes so stopping is often a limiting factor. I like to say it’s a 45 mph car with 25 mph brakes. It has plenty of power to maintain speed on moderate grades. Like any of the early Studebakers, finding parts can sometimes be a challenge - about the only repro parts I ever found were rubber door bumpers.
 

Of course, the quality of the restoration will dictate just how well the car runs, drives, stops, holds up, etc.

Scott

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Well isn’t that interesting. I’d like to get at least a special six for the sake of the larger engine. I guess that’s not the car for me. I’m talking to the owner of the two cars in PA about her late fathers big six. Far away but I am hoping it’s a better car. 
once again Scott, thank you for your help and I’m still hunting. 

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The Special Six and Big Six engines are also splash lubricated and cruise at similar speeds. A little bigger and heavier cars so the difference in engine power is probably a wash. The biggest benefit would be the added size. If you are looking for something to drive more, I would suggest a later 20s model with four wheel brakes. Having a full pressure lubricated engine is a benefit also but not nearly as much as having front wheel brakes.

Scott

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Posted (edited)

I am struggling with this - 

I have a 1930 car with four wheel brakes, but I want an earlier car. I am a little over 6 feet so I have been looking at mid size cars and bigger(ish) six cylinder engines.  I do want to drive the car alot, but I just dont see a way around having two wheel brakes. Unless I find something that has been converted. I could get a 24  buick or chrysler with four wheel brakes, but I dont much care for those cars. Still hunting. Need to see more cars in person. 

 

 

 

L

Edited by Linus Tremaine (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

I guess it depends on where you plan to drive and how much. I see a lot of Model Ts on the road and I’ve put a bit over 1500 miles on my Light Six since I finished restoring it in 2016 so if you recognize limitations, keep some following distance and maybe add a brake light bar you can enjoy driving these early cars. You sounded like you wanted a nice pre-war cruiser but you already have one. I enjoy driving my Light Six as much as my 1939 LaSalle but I do have more limitations in the Stude. If it an early Studebaker Touring car Is what you want then don’t let those limitations hold you back. They are nice cars and a lot of fun to drive.


My advice is just post your location and see if someone nearby will give you a ride or let you drive their car to see if it’s a good fit. Lots of kind Studebaker owners in every state. I don’t know why people (including me) don’t ask around to experience a particular car before they commit to buying one. Good luck on the hunt.
Scott

Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)

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Scott

Please explain splash lubrication I thought the light six has an oil pump.

 

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On 6/28/2020 at 9:28 PM, Linus Tremaine said:

Well isn’t that interesting. I’d like to get at least a special six for the sake of the larger engine. I guess that’s not the car for me. I’m talking to the owner of the two cars in PA about her late fathers big six. Far away but I am hoping it’s a better car. 
once again Scott, thank you for your help and I’m still hunting. 

there's a nice model EQ with special six available near here... duplex with rumble seat. High quality older resto that sat awhile (indoors). Email for more info. Seattle area.

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10 minutes ago, John DePrey said:

there's a nice model EQ with special six available near here... duplex with rumble seat. High quality older resto that sat awhile (indoors). Email for more info. Seattle area.

I'd be interested in that as well...as I'm up here in the Northwest.  I'll shoot you a quick email.  Thanks!

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On 6/30/2020 at 12:07 AM, Stude Light said:

The Special Six and Big Six engines are also splash lubricated and cruise at similar speeds. A little bigger and heavier cars so the difference in engine power is probably a wash. The biggest benefit would be the added size. If you are looking for something to drive more, I would suggest a later 20s model with four wheel brakes. Having a full pressure lubricated engine is a benefit also but not nearly as much as having front wheel brakes.

Scott

 

I haven't researched this one but did the Big Six engine get a 'lubrication upgrade' about the same time as the Light Six became the Standard Six with full pressure lube - circa 1924-25?

 

I presume the splash fed engines have pressure fed mains but splash fed big ends like a lot of other similar era engines?

 

 

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fyi my email is retrostude@yahoo.com.  I might not have it in my profile... I did a story on the car in the northwest chapter newsletter a few months back. I can email you the newsletter with pics... or call owner Pat Bryan in Gold Bar. 360-631-7532. 1925 model EQ Special six, restored by a guy named Dick Kiser. Big 6 upgrade and transmission boosted brakes, whatever that means. 

 

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20190420_120039.jpg

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1 hour ago, John DePrey said:

fyi my email is retrostude@yahoo.com.  I might not have it in my profile... I did a story on the car in the northwest chapter newsletter a few months back. I can email you the newsletter with pics... or call owner Pat Bryan in Gold Bar. 360-631-7532. 1925 model EQ Special six, restored by a guy named Dick Kiser. Big 6 upgrade and transmission boosted brakes, whatever that means. 

 

.

20190420_120039.jpg

 

 

Thanks for the information - I emailed you for the copy of the article and I'll reach out to the owner!

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4 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

I haven't researched this one but did the Big Six engine get a 'lubrication upgrade' about the same time as the Light Six became the Standard Six with full pressure lube - circa 1924-25?

 

I presume the splash fed engines have pressure fed mains but splash fed big ends like a lot of other similar era engines?

 

 

Yes, when production of the Light Six ended in 1924, the 1925 Standard Six picked up the design with a modified engine that included full pressure lubrication, higher compression ratio and the trans was also bolted to the engine. The Special Six and Big Six picked up on all of these improvements in 1925 also. The Standard Six engine design was then carried into the Dictator.

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that seems like a great car too. I was considering earlier cars, but the four wheel brakes are appealing. I should stay away for fear of losing focus!

 

Any idea what they are asking?

 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/29/2020 at 9:37 PM, rbk said:

Scott

Please explain splash lubrication I thought the light six has an oil pump.

 

Bob,

The Light Six has an oil pump but basically free flows the oil with only a few psi. Oil is picked up from a screen in the sump and is distributed to a set of pipes that fill slots in a tray located under the spinning crank train. The bottom of the connecting rods have “fingers” that dip into these oil filled slots. Those fingers splash the oil into holes in the connecting rod caps and splash all through the engine. The top of the large ends of the connecting rod also have holes which gravity and rotation of the components drive oil into the rod bearings. The main bearings have “funnels” built into the top side of the bearing supports which pool with oil that flows through a hole into the top side of the bearing. The piston pins also have holes that pick up splashed oil along with the splash on the cylinder walls similar to modern engines. Valves just see splashed oil also. The cam shaft bearings are feed low pressure oil directly from the pump through drilled passages in the block. There is also a small nozzle that sprays oil on the timing chain.

 

The dipper tray is shimmed to provide the correct depth for the connecting rod fingers - explained in service manual.
 

Scott

Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)

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17 minutes ago, Linus Tremaine said:

that seems like a great car too. I was considering earlier cars, but the four wheel brakes are appealing.

 

The optional four wheel brakes they came out with in 1925 was not a good design so do some research before buying.

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I love the look of it, but its not what I am looking for. I hate to pass on any car when I am having such a hard time finding what I want, but thats just not it. 

 

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On 6/30/2020 at 10:20 PM, John DePrey said:

how about a 1925 duplex phaeton? Driver for sale in Idaho.

john,

That may be of interest to me. How can I see some photos?

 

Linus

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It's also in our northwest chapter newsletter, email me at retrostude@yahoo.com and I'll send you a pdf. Priced at $12k.

Owner Jim Tefft drove this regularly. Most recently I saw it in Calgary (2017), Harrington WA (2018), and the 2018 international meet. Not a trailer queen!

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