Buick35

Old wives tales for cars

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Posted (edited)

"It's worth 10 times what I'm asking for it"

or

"It's worth 10 times what I paid for it"

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

How about the Stanley Brothers, if you were driving and you’d keep the throttle wide open on a Stanley for one minute, they’d give you a free car....

 

Or how about the all too common myth/belief that 6 volt car systems don’t work?  6 volts worked fine when the cars were new, if they don’t work now it’s corrosion or other issues with electrical path, small cables, bad starter...

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Or how about “it’s rare, so it’s very valuable”.... not always true....

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  • The value of a Mustang Boss 302 is so high that the fact one was driven over a fire plug does not lower its value. {actual ad to that effect}
  • Same as the Corvette that had a connecting rod exit the hood for sale recently.
  • Any of the luxury hybrid Fisker Karmas parked in Newark during Hurricane Sandy in 2012 would be a good buy. Only 4-8 feet of seawater washed over them. Just a case of a bad place to park 300 cars!

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Straying just a bit here but, more than once I have had someone come up to me while refueling at a gas station or parked at a shopping mall and say something to the effect of "Hey, nice Corvette. My uncle (dad, neighbor, etc.) used to have one back in the 50's. Y'know, when they were still made out of steel."

I never correct them.

😄

 

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A fella in my home town, years ago when I was a teenager, claimed he bought a fairly new mustang for a couple of hundred dollars because the previous owner had committed suicide in it by running a hose from the tailpipe into the window.  No way of verifying his story but it was well circulated around town.

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Always rev the engine as you shut it off to aid in restarting later.

 

 

The guy with the battery was allowed in the bar only if he agreed to not start anything...

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2 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Some years back I decided to test the claim that leaving a battery on a cement floor will discharge it. So I left a plastic case, 12V battery I knew to be good on the garage floor. Checked the voltage every day for almost a week. It did not discharge. Then forgot about it for 2 more weeks. When I tested it, it was dead as a door nail. Nothing at all. Tried charging it up but it would not take a charge. This is the only time I ever had this happen. I have other spare batteries I store on a wooden shelf and charge up every few months and they stay good for years.

 

All I can say is, try it for yourself. Buy a new battery leave it on a cement floor in the basement or garage for a month and see what happens. I know a guy who thinks I am a fool for believing this, he leaves his spare batteries on the garage floor all the time. He also buys new batteries 2 or 3 times a year.

 

I'm an engineer. Please explain the physics of how you think this happens.

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30 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

 

I'm an engineer. Please explain the physics of how you think this happens.

Rapid and uncontrolled discharge of the flux capacitor.

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43 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

 

I'm an engineer. Please explain the physics of how you think this happens.

I HAVE HEARD VARIOUS Explanations over the years but they all are based on this mysterious phenomenon known as "grounding". The grounding effect circumvents the plastic case which is electrically inert at which the little "E"s find their way to their doom. Concrete plays a vital role in this battery suicide as setting the unit on the dirt  is a benign act since I have never been warned of any ill effects. The steel rack at my auto parts store, sitting directly on the concrete floor. Again, direct contact with the killer concrete is essential. I suspect a coat of paint on the slab could save the lives of many innocent piles. 

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15 minutes ago, CarlLaFong said:

I HAVE HEARD VARIOUS Explanations over the years but they all are based on this mysterious phenomenon known as "grounding". The grounding effect circumvents the plastic case which is electrically inert at which the little "E"s find their way to their doom. Concrete plays a vital role in this battery suicide as setting the unit on the dirt  is a benign act since I have never been warned of any ill effects. The steel rack at my auto parts store, sitting directly on the concrete floor. Again, direct contact with the killer concrete is essential. I suspect a coat of paint on the slab could save the lives of many innocent piles. 

I think it’s the same issue with computer information.  Computer code is all binary ,so it’s nothing but 1’s and 0’s....if a computer cable gets a kink in it, the 0’s can sorta slide on through, but the 1’s will get hung up due to their sharp edges...This has been a problem for years...

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 I was working for a VW dealer as a unit repair tech back in 72. The chap next to me, a ex Hungarian fighter pilot who defected his Mig 15 into West Germany is installing a type 3 engine he just rebuilt, I'm on the bench rebuilding a transaxle when all of a sudden he starts shouting in Hungarian-more like cursing in Hungarian, but I'll never know, anyroad while installing this engine he slipped with his foot on the floor jack and the engine went up too far. Unfortunately his hand was guiding the engine up into the engine compartment and the engine tin pinched off the end of his index finger-left hand, and with every heartbeat a jet stream of blood spurting out he yells to me in broken English to get a battery quick! I find a battery in the shop and he opens one of the caps and sticks his finger right into the battery, this creates a fizzing effect bubbling all over, but it certainly stopped the bleeding. I grab the bandages out of the medicine cabinet on the wall and get a bandage and fix him up. He then says " all right then-lets get back to work" !

 

This was not a wives tale but a true tale none the less. 

  

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I regularly store old battery cores on the concrete floor in my shop. They stay charged for months with no problem. I was told the storage myth comes from a hundred years ago when batteries had wooden cases. It was widely believed the concrete some how drained the battery through the wood.

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2 hours ago, TerryB said:

A fella in my home town, years ago when I was a teenager, claimed he bought a fairly new mustang for a couple of hundred dollars because the previous owner had committed suicide in it by running a hose from the tailpipe into the window.  No way of verifying his story but it was well circulated around town.

 

Terry, 

I don't want to turn this thread ghoulish or anything but these things certainly do happen.

When I was in my teens, I found a guy who had done exactly that. The car was a nice 1968 Firebird. 

Unfortunately, I didn't follow up on the sale price of the car afterwards, but I'm sure it was very reasonable.

👻

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3 hours ago, TerryB said:

A fella in my home town, years ago when I was a teenager, claimed he bought a fairly new mustang for a couple of hundred dollars because the previous owner had committed suicide in it by running a hose from the tailpipe into the window.  No way of verifying his story but it was well circulated around town.

 

Everyone heard this story in our younger days. The version I heard was a Corvette, because for some reason the seller was unable to get the smell out of the fiberglass...

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It was a Corvette in my town also. There must be hundreds of stinky Vettes out there, languishing.

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There is also the old chestnut about the Cadillac with the Coke bottle in the quarter panel with the note inside asking "How long did it take you to find it, rich bastard?" Always a Coke bottle, never 7up or Dad's Root Beer. I have encountered a number of people over the years who claim to be the body man that discovered this heinous act of domestic terrorism. We have liars and damned liars. I prefer to term them as the latter

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a) "I'm an engineer. Please explain the physics of how you think this happens. " Dew.

b) ""have liars and damned liars" and statisticians

c) my favorite saying involves a horticulture..

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Then there's the one about using clothespegs on the fuel line to prevent vapour lock. Don't know if it works🤔 but at least it doesn't interefere with anything. Seen this on a car once, see photo.

 

Clothespegs.JPG

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Heat sink and keeps it from touching hot metal. I used to build fuel lines that were as far from a hot engine as possible but then I live in a hot climate. Had to put my ROKU over a fan to keep it from overtemping. Moving air keeps things and people cool.

 

 

rokucool.jpg

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5 hours ago, trimacar said:

Or how about the all too common myth/belief that 6 volt car systems don’t work?  6 volts worked fine when the cars were new, if they don’t work now it’s corrosion or other issues with electrical path, small cables, bad starter...

 

Got that right I replace two this week one 6 years old and the other 7 and the auto supply place guy said I should convert to 12v. Told him no thanks these worked fine.

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11 hours ago, 72caddy said:

Haha, i still put my batteries on a wood on top of concrete! 

 

Waste of time. Unless you are worried about acid leaking out of the battery and eating your concrete......😉

 

 

10 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

Except your metal car sits on nonconductive rubber tires

 

And those tires are in the battery circuit? 

 

7 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

All I can say is, try it for yourself. Buy a new battery leave it on a cement floor in the basement or garage for a month and see what happens. I know a guy who thinks I am a fool for believing this, he leaves his spare batteries on the garage floor all the time. He also buys new batteries 2 or 3 times a year.

 

I do, all the time. No difference in sitting on concrete, wood, or in the car. They all self discharge. It's just how lead acid batteries work. 

 

These are used batteries, when did you last set a NEW battery on concrete? Didn't you buy it to put in a vehicle?

 

My test batteries (a 6 and a 12 volt) for auto radio repair sat on the concrete floor under my workbench for years. Of course they did need charging now and then, as I used them.....😁

 

Now having said all this, one thing that can affect lead acid battery storage is if the concrete floor gets COLD! Of course, if the floor is cold and the garage unheated, the battery will fail sitting on a shelf, in the car, etc.

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There was a guy in my town who's car was so fast that he would tape a hundred dollar bill on the dash and if you could pull it off under full acceleration you could keep it. No one ever did. I think it might have been one of the steel Corvettes

 

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