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Have any of you ever driven your vintage in extreme rain and recorded it?


No Bias FTW

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I am just curious. Note that I am talking about extreme rain, not just the usual heavy rain. 

For more info, start at around 2:38 in the video below.

 

I can't imagine how cars with older tech would fare in this kind of weather. Hopefully, there are a few of you who could share some insane, ASMR stories😁.

 

Edited by No Bias FTW (see edit history)
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Never in an old car, but did drive through something similar on I75 on the way back from the Snook's Dream Cars museum in Ohio last year. 

 

I love being in the car in a heavy rainstorm, and I do have films...not sure how to post them from my tablet though.

 

Edit: Now on my computer, I was able to do it. I forgot that I recorded it as a timelapse. The heaviest part I don't have on film, I was taking still pictures and in the museum. 

 

Edited by Billy Kingsley (see edit history)
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I was once caught in a downpour while driving my '21 Chevy roadster-pickup. The split windshield seal didn't help, and the hand cranked wiper wasn't much use either. I needed wipers on my glasses,too ! 

Even if I'd had a camera, I was too busy to operate it.

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When windshields were vertical, and protected

by visors about 3" deep, was rain as much an

obstruction to vision?

 

I like testimony from old-timers, those who actually

lived through a part of history.  I asked one older man,

now deceased, about driving in the side-curtain days.

The best way would have been to anticipate rain.  Otherwise,

he said, by the time you got the side curtains in place,

you were already wet!

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My Pierce is allergic to rain, especially because it is pretty much original in and out.

I'm sure the Rickenbacker has been caught in the rain a few times back in the 70's but there are no pictures of it.

I've driven my '64 Malibu in heavy rain because for awhile it was my daily driver.

Went through some puddles at intersections that were so deep the fan belt started squealing because the bottom of the engine was under water.

Took way too long to dry out those drum brakes to get it to stop after those deep puddles.

 

No pics of video of any of it.

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My wife and I drove our 1946 Ford Station Wagon from Long Island, NY to Encinitas, CA to attend the world's largest "Woodie" show, Wavecrest, in 2010. We drove the entire way to CA with zero rain. On our return trip, we weren't as lucky.  We left Columbus OH, heading for New York and we knew that there was rain in the forecast. We left our motel as late as possible to let the rain go east. We weren't on the road for about an hour and it came down in buckets with the blackest sky I have ever seen, those little windshield wipers simply could not keep up. We found the next exit on Route 70 and checked into another motel at about noon, an hour since we checked out of the last one. We must have looked crazy to the motel staff as my wife and I struggled to get the car cover on in a torrential rain. Sorry I don't have a video of that adventure, but I sure wish I did. If you drive your car, rain is something you will eventually need to deal with.

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Alice Ramsey leaving N.Y. in 1909 as she and her companions start their adventures for Alice to become the first woman to drive across the United States.  They departed in a rainstorm so all were dresses in their raincoats and the Maxwell car they used had tire chains installed to deal with the mud.  I read the book she wrote about the trip.  Since the open car was the transportation of the day, very little is discussed about the task of driving in rainstorms.  The bigger issue was the mud and flooding created by them as they made their way west.  Note the roll down windshield, rolled up in the picture, to protect them from the elements.

 

873BE7BD-CF73-4D4F-9118-EC08E072E5F6.jpeg

A058C564-ED93-4395-8035-D29BC535718C.jpeg

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)
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Probably the worse deluge I have ever been caught in was in this.

Wiper worked OK but windshield fog was terrible.

Maybe I was making my own mess because of open wheels but it was very difficult to see the road.

About fifteen miles to the garage was enough.

 

 

28 Dodge project 028.jpg

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Torrential rain at least once, in OK just north of TX, med-evening and a tornado warning maybe 50 miles away. The vacuum wipers in our '47 Dodge didn't stand a chance, we had to park it for a half hour.

 

Couple of wet driving photos below, both in the '24 T Speedster, both in interior BC, different journeys.

 

 

G1b05 Chris Jerry rain at speed.jpg

 

G1d13 Wet roads 97C.jpg

Edited by Chris Bamford (see edit history)
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Owing to geography and weather patterns in my part of the country, the hot daytime summer temps cause a lot of thunderstorms this time of year. I don’t mind driving one of my old rides in gentle rain (but not something I seek to do), but the danger where I live can be the hail that comes with the rain. Calgary had a recent hailstorm this month that damaged siding on houses, and will result in lots of insurance claims in the city. 
 

I think that car guys have a personal menu of sounds (pleasant and unpleasant) that always get a reaction. One of the sounds guaranteed to make me tense up is that little “clink” when you hear the first hard piece of hail hit your roof, and you start looking for a convenient underpass to shelter beneath (or large tree, abandoned insane asylum, former Pontiac dealer showrooms - no matter how creepy, you just need a place to duck into)!

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The first video reminds me of my trip coming home from the AGN in Auburn last year on that Saturday night. The only difference was I also had T-Storms, hail and winds along with the heavy rain. Made for an interesting drive on some back roads coming out of Auburn and to the Turnpike. The sound of the hail hitting my truck and trailer was loud enough to drown out the music that I was playing. I could not help but think about the AACA members that drove their Antique Vehicles to the AGN and hoped that they and there vehicles were okay. The hail and heavy rain let up after a while but the rain returned when I got to the Ohio Turnpike. Sure glad  I found a hotel room just off the Turnpike and stopped for the night. Over the next few hours a few severe storms came through the area but none of them had hail.

 

The next morning I saw an accident on the other side of the TP. A Class A diesel pusher pulling an enclosed 30ft car hauler had gone off the road and  down an embankment. Lucky for them the RV & trailer were still upright.

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That's not heavy rain, you need to experience a Florida frog strangler where you can't see 20 feet. Since Tallahassee in their infinite wisdom probited four way flasher when visibility is nil I just switch right and left turn signals then.

 

Sebring 1965 after it let up a bit. Picture racing in a carwash.

 

1965-sebring-floods.jpg

 

 

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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No photo proof but I got caught in a real gully washer in my 50 Ford F1. I have always liked RainX but it made me a real believer. Never even turned on the one vacuum wiper and at about 15mph it shed the water enough to see the road to stay on it. No place to pull off safely or I would have. Windshield leak so bad my shoes, socks and my pants from the knees down were soaked, I mean wring water out of them soaked.

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Yes. Several big downpours that lasted maybe 30 minutes in the 1929 Chrysler.  Making sure the window was previously treated with rainex really helped as the wiper couldn't even begin to keep up.

It was exciting! Sheri and I had to close the vents, and crack open windows, windscreen and side vents as water would comein, etc.  It really fogged up and on the inside - with no defroster - we just wiped the condensation away. The problem is the designs of the day - the windscreen opened up, the dash metal was formed to bring air downward- one gets pretty wet, so you close the windscreen and it fogs up fast - so you quickly learn about opening, closing, getting wet, laughing, having a great time.  A good Co-pilot made it MUCH better.

What was maybe most amazing.... the engine temperature went from normal 180-190ish to maybe ~100.  This made sense was there was SO MUCH rain coming through the radiator.  Plenty of steam from the engine compartment that was an additional challenge on the fogging.

 

We kept moving along.  It was fun and we learned a lot. I understand in the days, folks put a glycerin coating on the inside to stop fogging. 

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Yeah, my worst was once getting stuck in a torrential downpour coming back from a car show in a '38 LaSalle convertible I had recently bought.  Knew there was a chance of rain, but the weather sites didn't predict it would be so bad.  It was a long drive and I was worried it was going to get dark, making driving all the harder, so I didn't want to pull over by the side of the road for too long.  Seriously stressful given modern traffic, modern speeds, and not much visibility and no safety equipment.  Made it home fine in the end, but it was a memorable way to find out that the car wasn't particularly waterproof, at least facing that much rain coming down so quickly.

 

 

 

Edited by 1935Packard (see edit history)
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My wife and I came back from the Buick Club Nations in Flint and the Buick 100th anniversary in '03 in a pretty heavy storm. We were on the QEW coming into Hamilton using only Rainex. Our '60 Electra was only 40 at the time. It's 60 years old now.

We prefer secondary roads where one can just pull over, which I would do even in a modern car. Today's traffic is an obvious clear and present danger to the observant. You can't be too cautious. Who knows, the guy coming at you might be steering with one hand and have a camera in the other!

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Several years ago, I ran into a major thunderstorm in the mountains on a two lane road in my '47 Buick Roadmaster.  I just left an AACA National Meet heading home.  Vacuum wipers worked well due to the factory fuel pump/vacuum pump and did not slow any and no issues at all with the bias ply tires.   No decent place to pull off, so I just kept pushing forward.

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