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Dodge/Plymouth 218 6 Cyl. Flathead Engine


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I am trying to determine what year spread this engine will fit (without modification).

I know the Dodge, Plymouth block was physically smaller than the DeSoto, Chrysler block. But I believe the 218 is dimensionally the same as the earlier 201 6 cylinder. I would like to know what is the earliest model year that used this basic engine and what year is the last, I think 1959 or perhaps '60.

I know this engine had heavy usage in industrial applications as well but I'm trying to focus on automotive use in particular.

Appreciate any and all input.

Cheers, Greg

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Introduced in 1933, pan & valve cover, and manifold gaskets the same until end of production.

 

They widened the block in 1935 for the full length water jacket and adding a water distribution tube. From that point on until end of production the external size, mounting points, etc are the same.

 

I believe you can bolt a 1933 and up engine into any Plymouth or US Dodge 6 cylinder until 1959. Fitting a 1935 of later engine into a 1933 or 1934 runs into fit issues on the starter.

 

Some time in, I think, the early 1950s the changed the teeth on the flywheel ring gear and starter so to may have be careful with what parts you try to make work together.

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On ‎6‎/‎17‎/‎2020 at 12:05 AM, plymouthcranbrook said:

23 inch block in  USA, 25 in Canada, Various cu in displacement from 201 to 230. Some later cars had 2 bbl carbs..  12 volt system started in 1955. This is Dodge and Plymouth. Chrysler cars got engines with the 25 inch block and also I believe DeSoto as well. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysler_flathead_engine#Straight-6

Just wanted to correct this a bit - the 25 inch block did not appear in Canadian cars until 1938 when an engine plant was built in Windsor. Prior to that all 217.8 cu.in. engines had the 23 inch block.

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The change in the number of teeth on the flywheel coincided with the change to 12V in 1956. The 12V models used finer teeth, or more teeth, on the flywheel and starter.

Some models had the flywheel set back about 3/8" and a longer starter to match, not sure if this was another 12V thing.

In the early fifties they changed the water pump arrangement, some motors have a slightly different head gasket because the front water passage was changed.

Exhaust manifold outlet change from the back on the early models, to the middle of the manifold.

Would help to know what specific swap you were contemplating.

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Nothing specific Rusty, when I sold my '38 P6 coupe, (through a series of strange circumstances) I ended up with the fully rebuilt 218 for the car. My intention is to sell it so I want to make it available to the largest audience possible.

Greg

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On 6/26/2020 at 1:13 PM, GregLaR said:

Nothing specific Rusty, when I sold my '38 P6 coupe, (through a series of strange circumstances) I ended up with the fully rebuilt 218 for the car. My intention is to sell it so I want to make it available to the largest audience possible.

Greg

Greg, I'm a little surprised that you sold your '38. It was looking so very nice. Was it just time to move on to something that you liked better?

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