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1968 Cadillac Eldorado - South Jersey - Not Mine


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In general, the "Slicktops" are more desirable. Vinyl tops break the line of these striking cars, and serve to trap water, provoking expensive rust.    -    Carl 

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Here is a different viewpoint:

 

I grew up in the vinyl-top era, though later than this car.

To me, a vinyl top is dressy, and an opportunity for a

good-looking color contrast.  Cars without vinyl tops

were rarely seen, and were viewed as "plain jane"

stripped examples in my circles--almost as a car then

would have been viewed if it had blackwall tires and

dog-dish hubcaps.  To me, the lack of a vinyl top on

some models almost makes a car UNdesirable.

 

Rust below vinyl tops seemed to occur on some models

more than others, and not so much in the later 1970's

and 1980's for some reason. 

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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As nice as the gold one was condition wise, this is also a color representative of the era (better color imo, subjective of course) and in nice shape at half the cost.  Enough left over to add a vinyl top, which I would be on the fence on here...  If I ever get a 60s car it will be a '61- '63 Lincoln or a '67 - '70 Eldo.

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I think my preference would be for a hidden headlight Eldo in a period color like this. Or black on black, of course. But something unique, not the usual gold or white or olive green. Bleh. I personally like the colors that define an era rather than those that are perennially popular, which seems kind of boring. If you have a '50s car, you may as well have a turquoise or pink one rather than plain old red or white. I understand that's the safe choice, but the designers of the period had good taste and if you're going to go with that era, it makes sense to jump in with both feet, no? Same with this Eldorado. Something unique to the era but proper for the car. That's why I like this color more than the green/gold one that was also recently posted.

 

Sadly, I've found that most car guys have a pretty narrow range of vision when it comes to colors. Not much imagination and they all want to keep things safe. I had a '60 Thunderbird in pink a while ago that was just awesome, but more than one guy was afraid of what his buddies would say and therefore denied himself a great car with a period-perfect color. Why stand out when you can blend in, right? That seems really silly, but then again, it explains all the plain old red or blue or black GTOs and Camaros. No vision.

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Black on black is actually boring on this car, and I've seen a couple in person.  Mine is a somewhat dark blue with white top and white leather.  I would prefer it didn't have the vinyl top, but it doesn't look bad with it, either.

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There was a dark blue Eldo of this vintage for sale here in the greater LA area a couple of years ago that had originally been purchased by Jack Webb (Dragnet's Joe Friday). Apparently he bought a new one every year.

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On 6/16/2020 at 3:28 PM, Matt Harwood said:

…"I understand that's the safe choice, but the designers of the period had good taste and if you're going to go with that era, it makes sense to jump in with both feet, no? Same with this Eldorado. Something unique to the era but proper for the car. That's why I like this color more than the green/gold one that was also recently posted.

 

Sadly, I've found that most car guys have a pretty narrow range of vision when it comes to colors. Not much imagination and they all want to keep things safe. I had a '60 Thunderbird in pink a while ago that was just awesome, but more than one guy was afraid of what his buddies would say and therefore denied himself a great car with a period-perfect color. Why stand out when you can blend in, right? That seems really silly, but then again, it explains all the plain old red or blue or black GTOs and Camaros. No vision."

Amen!  Nothing sadder than a mid-'50's to '60's car that had a great color selections of wild period colors, such as turquoise, yellow, pink, rose-beige, iris magenta, light pistachio green, lavender, orange, bronze, etc, and the car is painted black, gray, white, resale red, tan or somber, bland color such as we have now.   Wasted visual potential and just plain boring.

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