Brooklyn Beer

Changing Tube tires

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Going to be replacing the tube tires, non split ring, on my 39 Chrysler.  One has a cracked valve stem.  Have spoons and irons, new tubes and tires. Right now I need to replace one tube to move the car around and then in a couple weeks I will be changing all after sandblasting,  then repainting the rims will be putting new tires on. Watched a few vids on changing tube motor cycle tires. Guessing car tires change the same way. Found an old thread about removing and replacing tires and tube will rim is on car. Lots of baby powder.  Anyone have any hints?  Never changed an antique car tube and tire before.

 

Secondly, what is good paint for rims. These were red. Not going for full resto look, something I can just paint here. Not going the powder coating route. These still show that they were red and were striped. The spare rim is in good shape but the others need sand blasted, primed and painted. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Your owners manual has a good explanation and pictures. I don't remember exactly but didn't 39 come with "safety" rims? If so you need a special tool to break the bead. Rob

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Pretty vague in the manual. Just soapy water on the bead area. No pictures. No mention of a safety bead.

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Just curious what I am missing here as to why you would not take them to a good tire store and have mounted (surely someone in a local club or ... know someone at a tire store that will do for you) - I am guessing they should go onto/mount right onto any modern machine via their design as I would guess they are nothing obscure and pretty much look like a modern wheel ?   Just make sure if running tubes to talc the tire casing and the tube.  And if running tubeless make sure you have a tire designed for such and that the rim does not have rivets or seems that are not calked and would result in air leakage.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

As to doing at home and not using a spray gun, try rustolium  Rust Reformer Spray Paint https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/stops-rust/rust-reformer and then rustolium automotive enamel - both are surprisingly good products for small projects when you do not want to get the gun out.    Personally, I like for non gun work to go to the local automotive paint store and have them make me up a custom few rattle cans for a couple hundred dollars  - and if I have the time I often just take to painter friends or on occasion take to the powder coater (we have two good ones locally). 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Not a fun job. Can't imagine doing it if one doesn't have to. Besides irons you should have a bead breaker and a heavy rubber mallet. After the new tube is in the tire partially inflate it before seating the top bead. If you get a wrinkle in the tube it will wear through. If you pinch the tube between the iron and rim it will leak.

You will get dirty, sweaty, and swear a lot. If lucky you won't break off a finger nail or two.

Enjoy.............Bob

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I want to do it because I want to do it. Tire store here in town wants 60 bucks a tire to demount then remount. Right now I want to get a new tube in the one tire to move the car around.  Already broke the bead on the one flat tire in 5 minutes.  This tire has been on here looks like for 25 years easy. Wasn't this something they used to do on the side of the road? Watching this vid I figure it works the same way.  My rims are not wire.  

 

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I wish that was the case here.  Everyone seems scared of "old" tires.  Think they give a high price so you don't want it done.  All young guys lacking any experience.  

 

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Is there anyone nearby that does tractor tires? I would give those guys a shot. Definitely tube tire experience required to do tractor stuff. The car tire stores don’t want it cause it’s not their routine.

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If all else fails, try your nearest truck stop. They have the experience needed to mount nearly ANY tire.

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The tractor tire guys here do them by hand. Even the rears. Talked to them about it.  About the same price.  I am not scared about doing them myself as I have the tools, was just curious if there was any hints or tricks I might need to know in comparison to changing another type of tube tire.  Soap on the bead, lots of powder on the tube, be sure of no pinching. 

 

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Brooklyn,

As opposed to a bike rim that you can do with a set of "spoons" (that I carry on my dirt bike), to do a car, with a much stiffer side wall, you will need a real set of tire irons !

Lots of WD-40 or really soapy water, and Dawn used 50/50 w/ water is what my tire shop uses and it seems to work the best. 

A BIG maul will also be needed and a BIG guy to kneel in the tire once you break the outer bead.

Watch a lot of you tube's first.............. 

My shop charged $20.00 a tire to take the old Denman,s off a split rim, inspect the insides, and put new tubes in. I brought the tubes in with me.

 

On painting, My wires were not bad, so a bit of wire brushing and a coat of Rustoleum did the trick.

You could check into "soda blasting". Could be a franchised guy in the area that would come to your place.

If I had to blast them, then a light coat of primer inside and out would not be a bad idea.

I know a lot of guys who got their wire wheels powder coated and are now regretting it.

The powder bridges the gap where the spokes join the rim and it cracks open.

Next time you wash the car that joint starts to rust.

 

Mike in Colorado

 

1931_chrysler_imperial_4_door_sedan_limousine_78142234ee.jpg

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I have used Ru-Glyde tire lube I think I bought it a NAPA. Make sure the new tires do not have any stickers inside the tire. Lots of good advice above, get the long tire irons and let both the old and new tires sit in the sun to soften them up. It is hard work.

 

Dave

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X2 or 3 on the wire brush, sandpaper, primer Rustoleum.  Need to let it cure for a week or more, though, before forcing tires on.

 

I broke the beads just by setting my boot heel right on the bead and bouncing up and down.  Even at 180 pounds that was enough. I did it in the garage door so I could hold on and keep from breaking my neck in the process.

 

There's also a tire mounting trick with trash bags that some guys say makes the tires jump right on.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

My Father and my neighbor were cut from the same cloth when talking about removing tires from the rim.  Take the tire off the car and put on the spare. Then put the wheel in front of the front tire. Slowly drive up onto the tire to break the bead. Then struggle to get the tire loose.  I don’t remember my Dad ever buying a new tire.  With a two mile commute to work and a weekly trip to the local grocery his tire worries were nonexistent. Since most of the tires he repaired had tubes he pulled them out, fixed them, and either took them to the local garage to air them up or often used a hand pump.  My neighbor was just to cheap to pay someone to do what he could do.  I told him he just enjoyed the struggle.  As far as painting I cleaned the wheels on my 52 and then painted them with POR15.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)
55 minutes ago, JRHaelig said:

 

 

There's also a tire mounting trick with trash bags that some guys say makes the tires jump right on.

 

 

I saw that.  Works like a slip and slide.   Driving on the tire seems easy.  If the bead stuck I was going to toss it in the press.  I don't even know if I am going to save but one of the tires for the spare but would like to inspect the tubes or would cut them off with a sawzall. The one that goes flat has a cracked valve stem.  Want to get all the tires off then sandblast the rims and repaint.  Is anyone making the pinstripe decal ?

Edited by Brooklyn Beer (see edit history)

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I took my 38 Studebaker 4 new tires to the local gas station (yes there are still a few with back bays around) and an couple hours later and $25 they were done. 😃 very easy and nothing broken. 
dave s 

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1 hour ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

I wish that was the case here.  Everyone seems scared of "old" tires.  Think they give a high price so you don't want it done.  All young guys lacking any experience.  

 

Perhaps look for someplace more truck related

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Getting the bead to break on both sides of the rim is the first obstacle to overcome.  That usually sets the tone for the rest of the project.  The motorcycle video seemed to skip that step.  You must keep the tire bead on the opposite side from where the tire irons are inserted in the drop section of the rim.  This will give you the flexibility you need to allow the tire irons to lift and pull the tire off the rim.  As you start out you have to be careful to keep the tire from sliding back on the rim.  Some insert a third tire iron to keep it from happening, I usually did not do this.  Take small increments of tire iron shifting around the rim at first to get enough leverage on the tire to lift it up, as the tire comes off you can move the irons farther apart from each other.  Once the tube is out and the first bead is off you get to do it all over again on the second bead.  
 

The big issue with new tires is their lack of flex.  The hotter the new tire is the better it will react to stretching as it goes on the rim and the rubber lube will help with that.   Be careful with not pinching the tube as the bead is pulled back over the rim.  Nothing worse than finding out the air is going out faster than you can put it in.  The tire irons will scratch the paint on the rim so be prepared to deal with that. There are ways to make homemade rim protectors should you want to use them.
 

I did tube motorcycle tires for nearly forty years and often thought I was nuts for doing this, especially with dirt bike tires that used rim locks to keep the tire from spinning on the rim.  My motorcycles with tubeless tires went to the shop to get done with a tire machine as the fit of the tubeless tire to the rim made the tire iron method too difficult and really scratched up the rim.
 

Have fun!

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Many modern cars do not have or even have a place for a spare.  I carry a tube, irons, mallet, slime, plugs, and compressor in my '11 Caddy.

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4 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

I want to do it because I want to do it. Tire store here in town wants 60 bucks a tire to demount then remount. Right now I want to get a new tube in the one tire to move the car around.  Already broke the bead on the one flat tire in 5 minutes.  This tire has been on here looks like for 25 years easy. Wasn't this something they used to do on the side of the road? Watching this vid I figure it works the same way.  My rims are not wire.  

By 1939 we were well into the modern era. Nobody in their right mind dismounted and mounted tires on the side of the road. You opened the trunk removed the jack, raised the car and put the spare on and dropped the flat off at a service station and grabbed a burger and a Coke while they fixed it. Changing modern style tires by hand is a miserable job. Unless you have access to compressed air, you'll never seat the beads with a  bicycle pump. BTW I'm sure you don't have wire rims since nobody does. The spokes might be wire but the rims ar certainly rolled steel

 

 

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