pkhammer

Advice that you'd give a guy that WANTED an early car

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Thanks for the leads John but at this point I'm not considering enclosed cars at all.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Posted (edited)
On 6/14/2020 at 9:38 AM, pkhammer said:

 I'm not leaning toward anything that early, definitely nothing pre-1915. Looking mostly at mid-twenties at this point and there seems to be plenty of that era in my price range.

  -thanks!

Yes. Later teens into the 20's the market is soft right now. Agree that is the place to look. As far as available parts. That would all depend on how rare the car, and its components are. Anything can be fixed or reproduced if you have enough time and money. Like others on here say, Buy the best car you can with the amount you have to work with. I never regretted buying my 1915 Buick. You could not put a price on the fun I have had with it, the friends I have made, and the joy it has brought to myself and others. That to me is far more valuable than anything else in the world. Things of this earth you cannot take with you. In the end, good memories and true friendship are things no one can ever take away from you. If you have to spend a little more for the car of your dreams, Go for it. And don't let it sit like a monument in the garage. Get out and go Touring with it. That is the best advice I can give you. Dandy Dave!  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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On 6/14/2020 at 7:48 AM, 58L-Y8 said:

Be forewarned, this 1928 Studebaker Dictator Series GE started life as a coupe, has been converted to the open car it is now.  That and the hideous clown colors reduces the value well below what is being ask. 

How come when 99% of the people make an open car out of a closed one,  it just looks wrong right out of the gate.  When i saw this picture before I even read your comment,  I said to myself,  that looks wrong,  I wonder if it was a coupe and cut up,  then I saw your post. 

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12 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

How come when 99% of the people make an open car out of a closed one,  it just looks wrong right out of the gate.  When i saw this picture before I even read your comment,  I said to myself,  that looks wrong,  I wonder if it was a coupe and cut up,  then I saw your post. 

The windshield and door tops are the dead give-away.  Neither are configured the way they built bodies then, not even the convertible coupes.  Worst, they rarely add any structural bracing to the pillars so the poor car is a shaky mess when driven. 

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Auburnseeker:

 The first 1920s Buick I was offered on our original post "Looking for a driver Buick" back in 2010.

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Terrible pixeled images of a 1926 Buick 2 door touring. At the time they wanted $17,500 for the cobbled mess. Originally a 1926 Buick model 20 standard 2 door coach.

Better photo when a broker was trying to sell in 2017.

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I am still smiling from the extreme extrovert comment. Wives and children seem to recognize that quite quickly. Driving down Main Street with the kids lying below the window line is a sure sign you aren't seeing it the way they do.

 

My son and I have a running inside joke that we have shared for about 25 years, maybe more. I was working with a person who always wore red suspenders. He would hook his thumbs in the suspenders and loudly announce "People think I am a fireman because I wear red suspenders". My son and I were taking an evening walk and the topic came up. Even though he was fairly young I shared MY thoughts on the guy. Wanna see my son smile. Go ahead, mention red suspenders.

 

My wife can tell some stories about my taste, too.

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  OK, I need a head to head test of let's say (1924 ish model year) Studebaker Big Six, Hudson Super Six, Nash Special Six and a Buick Six. Who wants to organize this competition and run them thru their paces? 😃 After my first week of research, this is where I'm at. Would at least like to hear pros and cons of each.

  -Parts Availability

  -Clubs/Support

  -Dependability/Durability

  -Ease of maintenance

 More than one has chimed in touting the Buicks and it seems they have a strong following. What about the others?

 

 

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Your best people to advise on the pro and cons of each choice are found in the club dedicated to those makes and years.  I'd suggest making contact with the clubs, ask to speak with those most knowledgeable and familiar with the specific models.  You'll get it 'straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak' better than we can advise.

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When they were new, those were all fine cars.  Now they're pushing 100 years old.  They've been exposed to a century of maintenance (or not), they've had numerous drivers, they may have incurred one or more restorations or just repaints of varying quality.  Some may be dogs.  A well-sorted one will give you pleasure whichever brand it is.  A dog will be a pain in the @$$ whichever brand it is.

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5 minutes ago, oldcarfudd said:

When they were new, those were all fine cars.  Now they're pushing 100 years old.  They've been exposed to a century of maintenance (or not), they've had numerous drivers, they may have incurred one or more restorations or just repaints of varying quality.  Some may be dogs.  A well-sorted one will give you pleasure whichever brand it is.  A dog will be a pain in the @$$ whichever brand it is.

 

This is an excellent point. The quality of the car today is far more relevant than what it was when it was new. There are plenty of awful expensive cars and an equal number of lovely inexpensive cars. What it was and what it is are two very different things, as oldcarfudd points out, and it all comes down to the care it has had over the years and the quality of the work that has been done to keep it healthy along the way.

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I think I would have done the body in something besides white.  Good thing they put whitewalls to balance it out a little otherwise all I could see when i looked at it was a white blob. It's like i just looked at a chrome bumper on a sunny day and can't see anything else. 

Were many cars painted white back in the day? 

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7 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Were many cars painted white back in the day? 

 

My understanding is in the prewar years white was considered only suitable for ambulances and milk trucks and almost never used on passenger cars, it is a little pet peeve of mine to see a white prewar car, Todd C

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Be sure you get a chance to get some good experience riding in and driving those early open cars. A few years ago a friend of mine bought a Model A Ford roadster pickup. I had always liked that kind of car since I was a kid. Riding in one makes you extremely aware of how little material there is between you and everything else on the road. I had no comfort level at all when I rode in it, very much like being exposed on a motorcycle. He sold it within a year for the same reason, not enough "meat" around you in traffic.

 

100 years ago in country traffic it would have been fine. I am not overly cautious but I lost interest after the experience. Just be sure you get out there and sample what you are going to find. When the other driver's mission seems to be how fast and how close can I get you will see. I am sure there is a long list of people whom would disagree. They can. But you need to be sure you are comfortable on your own.

 

Bernie

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1 hour ago, poci1957 said:

 

My understanding is in the prewar years white was considered only suitable for ambulances and milk trucks and almost never used on passenger cars, it is a little pet peeve of mine to see a white prewar car, Todd C

 

Before my knowledgeable fellow members critique me note I am aware that there were popular brass era Buicks and others painted white circa 1908-10 and that coachbuilt cars could be ordered in any color desired (the excuse used for many questionable restoration color choices).  But my understanding is that in the 1920s and 1930s white was not usually used both due to the ambulance/milk truck association AND that white paints had poor durability and would turn chalky in a relatively short time.  Does anyone know if that was the case?         

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  As far as colors are concerned, I may have had a very high degree of curmudgeon exposure in my developing years because I can recall LOTS of comments regarding peoples choice of automotive  colors. Many of those comments would not be acceptable in todays world and some may have induced fisticuffs at the time.  😆

  The '19 Buick would look much better in another color.

  Its my understanding that most paint jobs didn't stand up well prior to the introduction of acrylic and urethane paint.  I do know nitrocellulose  lacquer didn't weather well.

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2 hours ago, poci1957 said:

...But my understanding is that in the 1920s and 1930s white was not usually used...    

 

I read a car review by famed Tom McCahill-- I think for the

1955 Imperial.  That was when white was just coming into

common usage.  He said that many would think the white paint

on that particular Imperial was gaudy, and not within their taste.

 

So even in 1955, white was considered out of the ordinary.

I agree that white was not normally seen on a 1920's-30's car.

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44 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

.....he said that many would think the white paint

on that particular Imperial was gaudy, and not within their taste.

 

So even in 1955, white was considered out of the ordinary.

I agree that white was not normally seen on a 1920's-30's car.

 

Interesting comment, as by then white was being widely used, especially in two tone combinations.  

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White was the showcase color for the 1953 GM Motorama cars (Eldorado, Skylark, and Fiesta). However, that might have been the game-changing moment, because I can't think of many white cars before then and quite a few afterwards.

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2 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

White was the showcase color for the 1953 GM Motorama cars (Eldorado, Skylark, and Fiesta). However, that might have been the game-changing moment, because I can't think of many white cars before then and quite a few afterwards.

 

I also think 1952-53 is about the beginning of the time frame.  Looks like Ford provided the 1953 Indy 500 Pace Car in ivory white and by 1955 they used bright white widely in two tones and with matching two tone interiors featuring bright white vinyl.  Before 1952 you might see off whites like light gray or cream but never a bright white like later,  Todd C  

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Now, that the white paint has been thoroughly discussed.... could we bring this thread back .... to having people who have experience with the makes & models of cars PK is interested in... describe their driving and maintenance experience with them.... I am interested in learning more about the various cars as well ... thanks, Sunny  

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  It's all interesting discussion to me gentlemen. I learned that I DON'T want a white car. Green 👍 Blue 👍 Black 👍 Red and Silver 👎 White 👎

  I haven't asked about 0-60 times or 1/4 mile ETs yet either. 😜

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Elapsed Time is about a hundred years give or take a decade.

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 And 0-60 depended on how steep the hill was to roll down?

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20 minutes ago, pkhammer said:

  It's all interesting discussion to me gentlemen. I learned that I DON'T want a white car. Green 👍 Blue 👍 Black 👍 Red and Silver 👎 White 👎

  I haven't asked about 0-60 times or 1/4 mile ETs yet either. 😜

 

Yes, this took a turn regarding the white paint thanks to me, sorry about that.  HOWEVER it could be relevant in that lots of these cars that were restored in the 1960s will have incorrect colors and this way you can be aware that a white car 1920s car is probably not authentic 😉

 

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