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Advice that you'd give a guy that WANTED an early car


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 Ok, I'm going to brace myself for a lot of opinions on this one but I think this'll be fun. I truly enjoy and am in awe of the depth of knowledge that the old car Curmudgeons (I say that with total respect!) on this site. So...before I give you guys the real question let me give a little background on me.

 I was born in 1963 so I'm just a young-un to a lot of you. When I was six we moved to a rural area where fast cars and street racing was popular and I grew up seeing and hearing the '57 Chevys, Galaxies, Impalas and Mustangs roaring down the roads. By the time I got my licence cars of the late 60's and early 70's were plentiful and cheap. As a young man I owned a '57 Ford custom cab big window pickup, a '70 Plymouth Duster, a '68 Olds 442, and a '67 GTO among others. Fast forward about 25 years.........I got into Ford model A's about 10 years ago and have owned several, but here lately I have been thinking about maybe jumping into something a little earlier, a little rarer perhaps. So here is the question: Keeping the following desires in mind, what would you recommend I look for?

  1 -Year range roughly 1915-1925

  2 -Something relatively easy to maintain with decent parts availability

  3 - Needs to be able to cruise at 40-45 mph comfortably and go maybe 55 if called upon.

  4 -Needs to be an open car, touring or roadster

  5 -Needs to be affordable -$15k or below for sure, closer to $10k would be better.

  6 -Not looking for a model T or a Chevy....thinking more along the lines of Buick, Dodge, Willys-Overland, Studebaker? I've got a secret attraction to Franklins..........

  7 -Not looking for a project or a trailer queen, just a decent running, complete driver to enjoy.

 I know the market is changing as older guys pass on and the younger generation is not interested. Where is this heading and what should I expect to see in the market over the next year or two?

  

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See if you can't find someone that will take you for a ride in a car of the era you seek - the brakes on the cars of that era are a bit different then the brakes on a car even a decade newer. You will have 2 wheel brakes, talk to the owner of that era car and ask if he has driven it in the rain at 40-45 mph and how well it stops ( 2 wheel brakes, narrow tires) If you are not familiar with this or used to it , it could be a rude awakening.

I agree that what you want to , or have to spend is a bit low for an open car needing little or no work.

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Here's something for $17k obo:

https://forums.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/buick/e34/2385363.html

 

I just checked Buick but see a range from this as a running vehicle to much more than this $.

 

My advice would be GO FOR IT!  I would and when I finish the current project want to do the same thing.

 

 

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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 Please don't misunderstand, I realize that $15k is probably more realistic but I'm not necessarily looking for a car with nice paint, interior, etc., somewhat of a beater might even be really appealing to me. I am certain if I was looking for a closed car I could probably set my sights well under $10k.

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 Yes kgreen, that's what I'm talking about and that looks to be a really nice car with good paint, top, and upholstery to boot. So, what would that same car be priced at if in a unrestored but driving condition? I foolishly passed up a 1915 Dodge roadster in unrestored but running condition 2 years ago that was for sale locally for $7,500 so I know they're out there.

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49 minutes ago, pkhammer said:

  I was born in 1963 so I'm just a young-un to a lot of you.... 

  1 -Year range roughly 1915-1925

  2 -Something relatively easy to maintain with decent parts availability

  3 - Needs to be able to cruise at 40-45 mph comfortably and go maybe 55 if called upon....  

 

I think of someone in his teens as maybe a young one,

but it's good to think young!  The enjoyment of old cars

can be ageless.

 

I was in your position a few years ago.  The cars I had were 

no older than 1957, and I thought the next generation might

try owning an early car.  I wanted something more unusual, though,

whether it was a Cole, a Pilot, a Paige, a Stutz, etc.  My part of Penna.

is full of antique cars of all ages and shops to support them, so I

felt more comfortable jumping back by several decades.

 

Note that the cars you seek aren't going to meet your speed

requirements.  My car is large for its era, but its "sweet spot"

for driving is 25-35 m.p.h.  The state speed limit was 12 m.p.h.

in town, and 24 on the open road, and almost all roads were dirt,

so my car is in top gear (4th gear) at 25 m.p.h. 

 

Are you willing to vary your requirements to enjoy the slower

driving of scenic country roads?  Are you in an area that has 

plenty of them close at hand without much traffic?  Is there

someone to work on them, or teach you to do the work?  Then you

may be all set!  I suggest a Buick or a Dodge if you're looking for

decent availability of parts, Mr. Hammer.

 

 The car I got, pictured below with my younger cousins, is from 1916.

 

Parks family reunion 2013 (18).JPG

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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 Super nice looking car John! I am used to driving Model A Fords so I may have to lower my expectations down from that somewhat. I do live in a very rural area and have a plethora of two lane roads in any direction for the end of my driveway to enjoy. As far a working on them I am a decent mechanic, I did all of mechanic work (engine assembly, clutch, etc) on a few model A Fords but I admit that some of the earlier ignition systems intimidate me. There are some good mechanics however in my area. I owned a Model T Ford for a short period and although I enjoyed learning to drive it the fascination soon wore off, it was simply too slow.

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16 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

I think you're probably 25 years too late to find a running, driving open car for $10K.

 

Or perhaps a year or two too early ? Kgreen has just proved that 15 will get what you want right now.

Iiterally today ! Certainly Dodge is also a very good choice. If you need to get one for 10, as I  say, in Today's market, just wait a while. You won't have to wait too long, but you might have to face up to slower cruising. 40-45 steady would be optimistic for an inexpensive car of + or - the 1920 period. Forget 55. My big mid '20s Cadillacs can do that, but, having the stump- puller gears, they prefer 40 or less. They have 4-wheel brakes, and are in very good condition, but you absolutely must consider the archaic, dangerous handling of these old crates. For my Cads, I have been in situations where I have to drive that fast in order to keep  up with traffic, where not doing so would be dangerous. Don't put yourself in that predicament.

 

You will find what you want in your price range. Just make sure you fall in love with it.    -   Carl 

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Get in touch with Tom Laferriere, that era is a sweet spot for him.  I get the desire completely.  We are the same age and have the same Model A, BTW.

 

I thought the Maxwell Kevin Fleck sold a few months ago was a great deal... nice paint, top, etc.  sorted and an ask around $14 or 15k.  

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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Im just a year younger and would love to go back in time and have a Model A one of these days. My old car experience goes back as far as a 53 chevy, so nothing real to add. Without any knowledge, other than what I have read I think with the desired age range, 30mph would be optimistic. I had a 1913 motorcycle and  on the books it would run 60mph! The particular model I had was banned from the Brooklands in the day for being too fast and having an unfair advantage. That said, I think the fastest I ever had it was about 30-35 and that was scary! One of the first comments people would ask is 'how fast is it?', How fast it would stop was the bigger issue. Very good point about finding someone with the type of car you desire and take it for a spin.

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Where are you located, Mr. Hammer?  How far can

you travel to get just the right car?  That might help us help you.

 

Here is a 1924 Buick touring car, advertised on the 

Horseless Carriage Club of America's website for $16,800.

It should meet your age-range and parts-availability criteria,

and with the recent work done, the owner probably spent

a lot of money to get it to this point:

 

https://www.hcca.org/classifieds.php?cars#

 

"1924 Buick 7 passenger touring recently enjoyed:

Expensive engine rebuild

New honeycomb radiator

New front end parts

New brakes

5 new tires, tubes and flaps

Replated radiator shell

New shiny black paint on hood and fenders

Make this strong running Buick yours for $16,800

Contact:   Dale Watson, Skowhegan, Maine, (207) 399-0437"

 

14355.jpg

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I'm not at the point where I'm ready to fly all over the country to check things out. I am JUST BEGINNING this search to see what's out there and more importantly, get some good advice from the fine folks on this forum. I am in Virginia and if I found something that really tripped my trigger I might travel to the "mid-atlantic" region (VA, PA, MD, WV, NC, SC, TN) to see the right car. I am not one that buys a car until I've seen it in person and driven it and as someone stated above, fallen in love with it. I recently had my very straight and solid '64 Falcon Futura (2 dr hardtop 260 V8 4-speed car) painted and as soon as I finish putting on the chrome and installing new carpet I think I will put it up for sale to finance this new purchase. If I find the right car I can afford to buy it before I sell the Falcon BUT I won't have garage space.

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I will eventually be looking for a car similar to what you have in mind. But I am giving myself and the market at least 5 years unless something really exceptional turns up. The truly great cars will probably hold their current values but I suspect a almost indefinite

slow, steady decline in prices for the vast majority of nickel era cars. As others have mentioned they are just too slow , and the 2 wheel brakes too limited for all but small group of old car people to take up future ownership.

6 Cyl Buicks like that 24 touring are reasonably capable cars. But most of the small ,4 cyl nickel era cars make a Model A Ford look like a high performance car.

 

Greg in Canada

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Advice? Seek long term psychiatric help. All kidding aside, there is a special attraction for the cars of '16 to '25 or so. The "nickel era" was unique, development had reached a point of relative reliability, the cars are easier to maintain and drive than the brass era cars were. However, for a variety or reasons, later brass era cars ('10 to '15 ish) tend to be a bit faster than the nickel era cars generally were, gear ratios and wheel sizes were generally lower in the nickel era. By the end of the '20s, technology was improving even more, everything was easier to use, and lasted longer. There is a "man and his machine" thing (similar to motorcyclists?) that began disappearing along with the introduction of synchromesh, higher rpm motors, and better brakes. Nickel era cars are just enough more of a challenge to feel a real sense of accomplishment in long tours. (Nickel era clubs tend to be both challenging and a lot of fun!) Although they have been called the "ugly era" by many hobbyists over the years, they have a special beauty in their simplicity, and crude attractiveness in their basic design that went away with the streamlining of the early '30s.

A lot of people in the hobby once inflicted with the nickel and brass era cars seem to always want something even another year or two earlier, and more crude, than before. (I am one of those!)

 

I have had and driven a few cars, and known dozens of people with many cars over the years.

Buick, the '18 to '24 four cylinder cars are good, the sixes are better! Any (good condition) Studebaker from '17 to '27 is good. Dodge are good, but a bit slower than Buick or Studebaker. All three of those are common enough, were made in large enough numbers, to have most needed parts be reasonably available (network with marque clubs!!!!). Quite a number of cars, most notably Nash, and Hudson, are quite good, but just rare enough that if one needs an important piece? One might miss the tours for the next year or so? Star is another, not bad. A bit slower, most important pieces not too hard to find.

A lot of the "in-between" cars, (I have a fondness for Paige and Jewett), were mostly "assembled" cars. Sometimes, parts are impossible. Sometimes not bad at all. Some of them were not well built, Many, like the Paige, were built as well as almost anything of their era. Sometimes those "in-between" cars have one advantage. They are rare enough, that if say the transmission eats itself? You start from the assumption you are NOT going to find another correct part. So you begin by finding a good close fit, and adapting it to work. Not a wonderful thing to do, but how many people will you run into that would know the difference?

 

An aside story. My dad bought a '27 Paige 6-45 in 1967. The transmission was blown. He was never good at getting anything done, and one thing or another, the car hasn't run since 1948. I did spend some time working on it as family allowed over the years. One thing I did, many years ago, was search for a transmission. Ads in Hemmings, many phone calls, lots of letters. No joy. Eventually, after about fifteen years, I came to the conclusion that I would have to adapt something. I began seriously looking for a late '20s or even considered a later '30s transmission to fit. Suddenly, at a small hardly worth going to local swap meet? There it was, out of a Jordan, almost exactly my Paige transmission with everything I needed to repair it. It still is not running. But if I or anyone else does decide to finish restoring the car? It should be good to drive. The transmission and clutch are all good original parts, in place, and adjusted.

 

Most of all, find and buy a car you can love owning and driving. Okay to look for a good deal. But after that, forget about getting most of your investment back. Don't worry about the markets. Just enjoy it!

 

Got interrupted again. I started writing this when there were only four replies. Oh well, post anyway.

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 Thanks for the thoughtful reply Wayne! Lot's of helpful information there. I have a friend two miles down the road that has a '21 Dodge touring he might let me drive. I have also thought that I may need to include something slightly later, like say a '27 "Fast Four" Dodge, might be perfect for me.

 I am not worried about the "investment". Of course I want to get he most car for the money spent but I am really only concerned about the joy of ownership. 

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I'll bet you can find a pretty nice Dodge touring car for that money.  It would satisfy your first 4 criteria except 55 would be pushing it with the rear end gearing they typically come equipped with.  I've gotten mine up to 50 on a nice smooth, straight, mostly empty road without much trouble but I'm not sure the engine would be happy running at that speed all day.  Maybe a 6 cylinder is better for the higher average speed but gearing is still a major determining factor.   My '25 Dodge seems pretty comfortable at 40 -45 though.  The two wheel (rear) brakes are not too bad for what they are.  Panic stops are not going to happen though (well, you may panic) since it's not too difficult to lock them up and then you have much reduced braking effect and unpredictable handling.  At least the Model A has 4 wheel brakes.  I really have to pay more attention to what is happening further ahead than I was used to.  Stops need to be more planned.  If I were really going to go on long tours or spend much time driving in (moderate) traffic, I would probably try and adapt later model Dodge mechanical front brakes or possibly a hydraulic set up on the fronts as long as no irrevocable changes were needed.  But to me, the fun is in experiencing the sensations of driving the car as it was originally built.  Almost like a time machine...  

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1 hour ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Get in touch with Tom Laferriere, that era is a sweet spot for him.  I get the desire completely.  We are the same age and have the same Model A, BTW.

 

I thought the Maxwell Kevin Fleck sold a few months ago was a great deal... nice paint, top, etc.  sorted and an ask around $14 or 15k.  

That was a nice Maxwell and it also had a Mitchell overdrive so it would cruise all day at 45. I miss it a little but it was nothing compared to driving a Cole with the big V8..

 

For the original poster there is a lot of variance in the cars for sale in the era you are looking for.  A lot of the cars that look like great deals will cost you more to actually sort them out.  You really need to get to know some people that own these cars and may sell in the future.  You will be  hard pressed to find a car with your speed specs in the price you are looking for.  That being said if the car is done and set up right it will be a joy.  Heck, my 1911 model T speedster ticks off your speed and driving requirements as it cruises at 45 and tops at 55.

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I don't have any advice as to what kind of car you should buy. My only advice is to buy quality. Don't set a hard limit, be prepared to spend a little extra on a high-quality car when it presents itself. You'll come out ahead in the end and you can enjoy it right away.

 

Buying based on price and trying to keep it as cheap as possible is the ideal recipe for buying a car that is both dissatisfying and unexpectedly expensive.

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 I'm open to spending more for the right car. Around $15k is what I expect to get for my Falcon so that's kind of my starting point. I 100% agree that price alone should not be the #1 factor when buying a collector car, or anything else for that matter.

  If there are a handful of cars from that general era that I should be looking at that will fill at least most of my criteria, I want to know what they are. Better yet if someone reads this that has first hand experience with some of those models I want to hear from them. That may help steer me towards what might be good candidates and which ones to avoid.

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I too jumped into an early (1919 Dodge) car with the same thoughts. I was very limited locally (Ts, As, and the Dodge). For the Dodge 30-35 is about as fast as you want to push it and yourself. These cars take both hands and feet at all times. Running joke in my family is the "prepare to stop" announcement as the two wheel brakes take some getting used to.

 

Pros: Unique in my area, reliable as it starts and runs easily even after long slumbers, brings a smile to everyone that sees it, Durable, Very easy to maintain. Strong support with club and parts.

 

Cons: Limited to neighborhoods and side roads. People are so busy looking they tend to tailgate or pull right out in front thinking you have time (you don't), Everyone thinks it's a Model T or a Duesenburg (DB wheel caps), people ask why don't you put a small block in it. Best to have an enclosed trailer if you really want to participate in local events of any real distance from your home.

 

Given your criteria, I would think a mid-20s car and up is the better choice. 

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First off I like your enthusiasm for the older cars. I have had multiple orphan cars Franklin , Empire, Cartercar. I have a model A station wagon and a 64 Studebaker. My favorite car is a 1908 Maxwell NC, which is a big roadster that can tour a bit with bigger cars. The most used of the older cars is a 1911 Ford torpedo. Of cars I once owned that I would suggest is a Dodge Brothers. We had a 1920 and used it a lot. As to what I might have to sell at your high end, it would be a 1913 Hupmobile touring. Have fun with the search.

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 Thank you to everyone for sharing your thoughts. I have to say I see Dodge come up a lot and that was already at the forefront of my thoughts before I started this thread. I have a good friend two miles from me that is a Dodge collector and he and his son both are good mechanics. The fast four models of 1927-28 might be a very good choice.

  Also on the short list seems to be the sixes of Studebaker and Buick.

  What about Nash or Hudson? I don't think anyone has mentioned those.

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First you should decide whether your primary interest is in driving and maintaining an early car or is it more in the area of rescuing an early car needing work and making it  "all that it can be".  We have found that many folks enjoy the hunt for an old car,  the hunt for parts,  and the restoration of an old car to be more interesting and enjoyable than actually owning,  driving and maintaining the car.  We showed a car at Hershey last year that was the 5th full frame up show quality restoration we have done for the same fellow.  His enjoyment came from buying cars that seldom are treated to a full show restoration,  having them restored then selling them on at usually about 1/2 what they cost to restore.  Obviously not something many can do but it is good to know what your motivation is before you start.  If your desire is to drive an old car then by all means buy the best example you can find of the car you desire.  I own a few cars,  none of which are actually drivable simply because I enjoy working on various cars and solving problems far more than I enjoy driving and maintaining a car,  As they say, different strokes for different folks.

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 I've done a couple of full and partial restorations and what I DO NOT want is another long term project, I have a few of those lingering in the shop now that I barely seem to have time for. I had my Falcon painted two years ago and all I needed to do was a few weekends worth of work; install bumpers, grille, emblems, trim, carpet, door panels and door seals and here it is two years later and I have about half of that done and only that because of the "stay at home" situation. 

 I want something I can drive and maintain without  a lot of down time. I purchased a nice '31 Model A Ford slant windshield town sedan (my avatar) from a local estate about six years ago. It was an older restoration that had sat for many years and needed some tlc. I replaced the dry-rotted tires, changed the fluids, flushed the fuel system, rebuilt the carburetor, put in new points, plugs and wires and had a nice dependable driver. I don't mind doing maintenance items like that to make a car road-worthy but I definitely am not looking for something to restore.

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5 hours ago, pkhammer said:

  3 - Needs to be able to cruise at 40-45 mph comfortably and go maybe 55 if called upon.

 

 

That's going to be the biggest stretch with the nickle cars, 55mph is going to be pushing them hard (and the brakes...). My 22 cad will do 40-45mph comfortably on a cruise with its v8 but I don't think I'd want to push it much harder as it starts to get unpleasant 

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PK Hammer.........  I looked at your list.... and I have a vehicle... that is probably the most comfortable, reliable, safe, (good braking & steering)... and fast, (50-60 mph all day long ).... within your price range,( $15-16 K)..... Not a trailer Queen & not all shiny & fully restored, ( but fully renewed & maintained) ....... it also fulfills your Secret attraction ..... to Franklins...... 

From 1930 to 1934 Franklins really improved the cooling,  with the side draft system.. and increase the horse power to 100 hp... My car is not an open touring, (until you roll down all the windows, open the cowl vent, and tilt the windshield  open a little)....

I have owned and driven extensively; a dodge fast four, (40 mph feels safe),  several model A's, (35-40 mph feels like flying).... a 1929 dodge 6 cyl, & 1930 Chrysler 6 cyl, ( both feel comfortable at 45-50 mph, with hydraulic brakes).... This 1930 Franklin is the most road worthy car of the ones just mentioned, that I have driven as my daily driver, 50-60 mph all day long  at 3,300 rpm... accelerating up to 70 mph when needed.... and  with 14' brake drums, rebuilt hydraulic brakes..... it stops quickly without locking up the wheels... a real pleasure to drive... comfortable, smooth ride...... this car is for sale right now... for $16,000 ..... but I will be happy to take the price of your plane fare off of the price, if you want to fly out and drive it... I am sure you would buy it once you have driven a Franklin........ other cars of it's era that are comparable are Cadillac & Packard ...... If you bought it...... you might want to leisurely drive it back home, to get to know 'Her'.... sort of a honeymoon........... or I will take 1/2 off the cost of having it transported back to Virginia ....... all in all ... it is a real fine quality, good driving  full classic automobile... well engineered for it's time...

You would be getting it for a very good price.....     https://albuquerque.craigslist.org/cto/d/tyrone-1930-air-cooled-franklin-sedan/7132656802.html   

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Thanks for your post sunnybaba! I have looked at your car with great interest and the only reason I have not shown up at your doorstep to look this over in person is the distance between us. My gut tells me that I'd really like the car and your offer(s) seem very fair. There is one big problem of course and that is the fact that it is not an open car. I have never owned an open car and want one in a bad way. I have no doubt that much enjoyment could be had with this Franklin as it appears ready to be driven but I'm afraid I wouldn't be totally satisfied with anything other than an open car. If I had money and space for two it might be a different story but for now I need to stick to my guns and hold out for what I really want.

  -Greg

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12 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I don't have any advice as to what kind of car you should buy. My only advice is to buy quality. Don't set a hard limit, be prepared to spend a little extra on a high-quality car when it presents itself. You'll come out ahead in the end and you can enjoy it right away.

 

Buying based on price and trying to keep it as cheap as possible is the ideal recipe for buying a car that is both dissatisfying and unexpectedly expensive.

 

 

Wisdom worth beyond money...............

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Always expect to find a car above your budget that is just right.  When you do ,  do whatever you can to make it happen.  You will regret it if you don't.  

I have several times. 

Now I have these in my garage. Never would have if i kept in my budget. 

Everyone of them was more money than I was going to spend but I figured out a way to make it happen.  There have been others as well.

Good luck and let us enjoy the hunt with you. 

 

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 Beautiful cars auburnseeker! Your budget is obviously higher than mine! 😁 I can and will go higher, for the right car of coarse! Thanks for all of the advise, it's great reading all of the comments. This will not be a quick thing I don't think, it will likely take time especially with no car shows or swap meets to go to. I will keep you all posted on progress though. If I could talk Dave Coco out of his Cord for the right price, he is only 90 or so miles from me.

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Talk David Coco out of his Cord?

 

 

To quote an old timer I one knew............

 

 

It would be easier to talk the ears off a cigar store Indian.................

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I had someone recently make a very fair offer on my Cord, I thought to myself that if I sold it, every time a magazine article talked about them it would hurt, so told him no.  Let’s say the offer was a tad over your current budget!  One day it will be for sale, not now though.

 

I have a ‘27 DB fast four cabriolet, Greg, if you ever want see it or drive it. Not currently for sale either.  Mine is mechanically excellent, and I can tell you 50 mph would be optimistic.   Don’t let the “fast” fool you, it’s just a little faster than a Dodge “slow” four....but it’s a delightful car to drive around town and has done a Glidden tour or two in the past....

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2 hours ago, sunnybaba said:

PK Hammer.........  I looked at your list.... and I have a vehicle... that is probably the most comfortable, reliable, safe, (good braking & steering)... and fast, (50-60 mph all day long ).... within your price range,( $15-16 K)..... Not a trailer Queen & not all shiny & fully restored, ( but fully renewed & maintained) ....... it also fulfills your Secret attraction ..... to Franklins...... 

From 1930 to 1934 Franklins really improved the cooling,  with the side draft system.. and increase the horse power to 100 hp... My car is not an open touring, (until you roll down all the windows, open the cowl vent, and tilt the windshield  open a little)....

I have owned and driven extensively; a dodge fast four, (40 mph feels safe),  several model A's, (35-40 mph feels like flying).... a 1929 dodge 6 cyl, & 1930 Chrysler 6 cyl, ( both feel comfortable at 45-50 mph, with hydraulic brakes).... This 1930 Franklin is the most road worthy car of the ones just mentioned, that I have driven as my daily driver, 50-60 mph all day long  at 3,300 rpm... accelerating up to 70 mph when needed.... and  with 14' brake drums, rebuilt hydraulic brakes..... it stops quickly without locking up the wheels... a real pleasure to drive... comfortable, smooth ride...... this car is for sale right now... for $16,000 ..... but I will be happy to take the price of your plane fare off of the price, if you want to fly out and drive it... I am sure you would buy it once you have driven a Franklin........ other cars of it's era that are comparable are Cadillac & Packard ...... If you bought it...... you might want to leisurely drive it back home, to get to know 'Her'.... sort of a honeymoon........... or I will take 1/2 off the cost of having it transported back to Virginia ....... all in all ... it is a real fine quality, good driving  full classic automobile... well engineered for it's time...

You would be getting it for a very good price.....     https://albuquerque.craigslist.org/cto/d/tyrone-1930-air-cooled-franklin-sedan/7132656802.html   

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I thought I had read that you sold this.

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16 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Now my Cord is actively for sale,  but isn't that too new?  Not quite nickel Era. ;) 

If Dave sold me his Cord within my budget, I'd forget about the nickel era car pretty quickly! 👍

  • Haha 1
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