Mark Gregory

Battery that lasts 16 years and will go a Million miles

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Tesla supplier develops battery that will last for 16 years and a MILLION miles in breakthrough that could transform electric vehicle market

  • Tesla supplier said it has a rechargeable battery that could transform the market
  • The battery will last 16 years or 1.24 million miles before needing to be replaced
  • Tesla is set to release the technology later this year or early next year
  • The supplier noted that the battery will be 10% more than the current models 

Tesla has dominated the electric vehicle market for years and a new breakthrough could ensure it reigns supreme.

The firm's battery supplier, Contemporary Amperex Technology, told Bloomberg that it is ready to produce rechargeable battery that lasts for 16 years or 1.24 million miles before it would need to be replaced.

The China-based company said orders are ready to be filled, but added that the battery will cost 10 percent more than those currently on the market.

News about the secret 'million-mile battery first surfaced last month by sources that said Tesla would launch the new technology in China in a bid to reposition itself.

 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

In China.

ugh!

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To drive a million miles in 16 years, you'd have to drive over 60,000 miles a year.  So, for most folks, it's not much of a promise.  Now, if it could go 500 miles on a charge and recharge in ten minutes like my gas car, I'd pay attention.

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How many new car buyers hold a car longer than five years? Meaningless promise for 95 percent of the original buyers.

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Let's see now, how long would it take to drive a Tesla a million miles, considering how long you can go between re-charges, and how long it takes to recharge? 

Terry

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Terry, they just need to buy a long extension cord........

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For a lot less money, and a whole lot more room, I'm going to buy 2 Priuses, put one on a tow bar behind and run an extension cord up to the front one and drive forever. 

Now if I could only find a flux capacitor, I could go back and date that other girl................

 

Mike in Colorado

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

How many new car buyers hold a car longer than five years? Meaningless promise for 95 percent of the original buyers.

 

Here in the mid-Atlantic we still use salt/brine, but most people I know keep vehicles way longer than 5 years. 2011 is the newest pick up of my co-workers until one bought a used 2019 last week. So the first purchaser did get rid of it within the first 5 years, in only 4 months of use do to life changing event. This is not common. DC commuter cars are used until they can't, usually about 15 to 20 years, and way over 200k miles.

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Face it anyone here is in the 1%, just brought home a nice 89 Allante with 70k miles and both tops for a bunch less than I sold my last 109k Reatta 'vert for. A car I can reprogram. Underbody looks new. I love central Florida.

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I rather think the whole point of the longer battery life is to remove the problem of diminished resale value due to the batteries nearing the end of their seven year life span. Keep the car for five years, and everyone in the market knows the thing will need expensive batteries in two years. Remove that bug-bear, and suddenly a used Tesla looks like a lot better deal. And I'm too polite to mention Luddites, or Ostriches. Seems there is nothing quite like a battery car to 'polarise' the punters. 🙂

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If accurate, it is a big deal in battery technology,  Improved resale would reduce lease costs.  Certainly range, recharge time, and charging infrastructure remain issues.

 

Makes sense to introduce in the largest market which has many big cities where range is less a concern.

 

In the early days of the auto, steam was the more proven technology (steam locomotives were common) so I wouldn't entirely discount electrics.

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5 years? 

 

Lets see, bought a Volvo 240 in 88.  Wife drove it for 13 years, I drove it for 12 before it was murdered by a 16 year old.  

Got a 93 F150 out in the drive way I bought new.  

Replaced that Volvo with a Ford Escape that went over 12 years before I got tired of fixing it.  

Have a 2014 Edge I plan to keep.  Like that one.  

Owned a couple of my collector cars since the 80s.  

 

Get rid of a car in 5 years?  Shoot, that would be barely broken in by my standards.  

 

 

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No knock on your record (in fact, Bravo), but car companies cannot in general survive on customers who buy a car every 25 years.  With extended financing (whole 'nuther discussion) and other factors leading to original buyers keeping cars longer, OEM's have been extending the time they care about to the 7 - 10 year range in terms of testing.

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A big deal if true.  We're entering a world in which most cars and big appliances will be electric, and the battery is the most important part of them.  Any marginal improvement in the durability and sustainability of batteries is very important, and a dramatic improvement in battery technology is a game-changer.  

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Flyer15015, I'm going to make your day. Go to O'reillys auto parts website and do a search for part number 121G. They have the FLUX Capacitor you are looking for. Now good luck. See you in the future.  LOL.

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22 hours ago, bryankazmer said:

No knock on your record (in fact, Bravo), but car companies cannot in general survive on customers who buy a car every 25 years.  With extended financing (whole 'nuther discussion) and other factors leading to original buyers keeping cars longer, OEM's have been extending the time they care about to the 7 - 10 year range in terms of testing.

 

I have a feeling that a substantial portion of new vehicle sales are in the lease market. That generally appeals to users that get some sort of write off of expenses due to the vehicle being used at least partially for business purposes. In effect a indirect tax payer subsidy on vehicle sales.

I think quite a few car companies would be in trouble without the relatively rapid replacement cycle of the lease segment.  I get the feeling quite a few people who are actually paying the total cost out of their own pocket are on a significantly longer replacement cycle, possibly closer to 10+ years.

Quite practical given the reasonably long life of vehicles these days and the equally long styling cycle of current offerings.

 

Greg in Canada

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

I get the feeling quite a few people who are actually paying the total cost out of their own pocket are on a significantly longer replacement cycle, possibly closer to 10+ years.

Greg is correct.  I could not find a used lease returned Yukon Denali to buy, so I bought a new one.   According to my dealer, GM changed it's leasing program because they owned too many high priced lease vehicles that were being devalued too fast.  This made for scarcity of those vehicles in the used market.

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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15 hours ago, Morgansdad said:

Flyer15015, I'm going to make your day. Go to O'reillys auto parts website and do a search for part number 121G. They have the FLUX Capacitor you are looking for. Now good luck. See you in the future.  LOL.

 

The big "O" has a sense of humor.

To bad its out of stock.

I got on the BO list though.

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Posted (edited)

If I remember the scene right, a flux capacitor is powered by a banana peel, and a can of beer, that reacts with the pellet of plutonium in the bottom of the can.

I've got the beer and bananas, and the plutonium is on back order.

Maybe I should call Sheldon and see where he got his.........

 

After driving around Denver and seeing all the new and used cars for sale, (and Denver is a relatively small city), I believe that if they stopped making any cars right now, we would have enough inventory to last this country 50+ years.

 

My wife's 2002 dodge minivan, purchased in '04 w/ 60K on the clock, just recently rolled over 380K. Garage kept, it looks like a new car.

Local mechanic says he can drop in a reman engine and Transaxle for about 4K, including labor.

What could I buy with her car and 4K ??

Answer is nothing.................

 

Mike in Colorado

Edited by FLYER15015 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

I believe that if they stopped making any cars right now, we would have enough inventory to last this country 50+ years.

Maybe not.  The Northeast and ever increasing effort to add more road salt even when not needed,  Consumes cars rather quickly.  About 10 years and you have serious rust repair to contend with. 

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On 6/11/2020 at 12:58 PM, Bills Auto Works said:

I have no interest in owning a Tesla or any electric car, but I will always cheer better battery technology as it will also trickle down (pardon the pun) to the batteries we use!

 

To paraphrase an old advertising slogan: “When better batteries are built, Buick will use them?" :)

 

Rumors of new battery technology that would allow 400 to 500 miles per charge and re-charging to 80% (300+ miles) in about 10 minutes: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-53067009

 

And a quote from that article that is sure to get a bunch of people here riled up:



The next barrier that is likely to be broken is price.

The landmark challenge in the electric vehicle industry is to get a battery costing under $100 (£78) per kilowatt hour.

"At that point you start to get electric vehicles that are cheaper than the equivalent internal combustion vehicles," says Seth Weintraub, a US battery technology journalist.

Once that happens the internal combustion engine will be effectively dead., he says, comparing it to how digital killed off film cameras a decade ago.

"In car dealerships we're going to go from one electric vehicle in the back lot somewhere, to one gas vehicle in the back lot somewhere." 

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