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1929 Buick with artillery wheels. Tires 20x7, lug nuts 3/4”. What is max torque. Checking with torque wrench, existing seems to be 20 ft.lbs. One wheel needs to be straightened so looking for max allowable to adjust. 
Charley

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Hi,Funny I just googled the torque for my 35 with artillery wheels and is said as a general rule of thumb steel wheels are torqued to 80' pounds so that's what I did.Greg

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If your wheel system uses the 5 or 6 clamps , near the tire , where the fellow meets the wheel , the torque is pretty low. To support this look on Ebay at Jaxon wheel lug wrench. Note the small amount of leverage available with this tool. If you over torque you will damage the clamp and the fellow. The correct clamps are getting difficult to find. Do not over torque.

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Early rim bolts are very soft.  80 ft lbs is way too much.  My 1925 Buick artillery wheel is shown below.  I set my torque wrench to 20 ft lbs and felt like that was too much.  Then I used a 9" ratchet wrench and socket and checked that they were snug.  Put the torque wrench on 20, and I was spinning the nut and did not want to go any tighter and make the torque wrench click.  My suggestion is use a 9" ratchet wrench.   Make them snug and check them frequently.  I will have to play with these a little more before I can recommend a torque setting.   Hugh 

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14 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

My suggestion is use a 9" ratchet wrench.   Make them snug and check them frequently. 

I agree with Hugh.  Also note that the bearing surfaces between the lug and the nut must be clean and smooth to get a reliable feel for the forces applied.  Also note that the fine threads usually found on early car lug bolts are easily stripped.

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In the illustrated parts catalog they should show the wrench. It looks like what today we would call a speed wrench. Maybe six inches of lever?

 

Anyone have the pic or the wrench they can share a pic of?

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I have several cars with demountable rims (vs. demountable wheels).  About 25 lbs/ft is a start, and close to final torque.  I use a 9" ratchet myself until snug, and re-snug before each tour.  It is also important to spin the wheel slowly to look to for runout, using a tool box or piece of 4x4 lumber on the ground as a reference point to get the rim as true as possible.  If a portion of the wheel comes closer to the reference point than the rest of the wheel, that indicates that the rim is not fully seated on the wheel at that area, usually due to paint build-up.  Then tighten the nuts on either side of this high spot and spin the wheel slowly again to verify your work.

 

With wood-spoke wheels it is essential IMHO to periodically (maybe once a year) snug up the hub nuts on the back side of wheels; if they get loose, you'll soon be having the wheels respoked.

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Posted (edited)

Someone said 20lbs/ft was too much and I second that, the rim will start to collapse if nuts are over torqued.  Just snug and check them once in a while.  Did you know they had a form of Loctite back in the 20's and 30's?  It's called RUST which is what you get after the artillery wheels get wet.  I'm on my 3rd 1931 and have the speed-lug wrench/rim tool, similar style as shown in Hugh Leidlein's post above and it tightens the lug nuts more than enough even when used by a 70yr old geezer like me...

 

Dave

Edited by Str8-8-Dave
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