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Dandy Dave

D-day. 76 years ago June 6th.

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Posted (edited)

76 years ago today, June 6th, The Allies landed. It was an amazing feat and many manufacturing facilities were converted to the production of equipment and supplies in relatively short order to help win the war. To all who serve, and who have served, I salute thee. Thank you for your service. Last year, an old friend past on that served under General Patton. He was in the crowd when Patton gave his famous speech. I don't want you to die for your country, I want the other SOB to die for his. He told his story of his part in the war until his dyeing day. This post is in Memory of Richard Boswell. Patton's 5th Army. Tank Division. He was wounded during his service and carried shrapnel and the scars of battle for nearly 3/4ths of a century. Dick was an avid International Harvester Collector. Most of his collection was Farmall Cub, and I.H.C. Cub Cadet tractors and I was glad to be able to call him a friend.    

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Honored to call Daddy John Hudson a friend. Light tank commander crossed the bridge at Remagen. Passed last month at the age of 99. 
 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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Studebaker built the tracked Weasel vehicle that would go almost anywhere.  A number of them were on the beaches on D-Day.  The company published a small flyer with a copy of a letter from a soldier who was there and a photo of the beach at Normandy.  There were plenty of other vehicles there, too - tanks, 6x6's, Jeeps, etc..  Thanks go to the men who made it happen successfully.

 

p10_Normandy1.thumb.jpg.69de6d00ad6b52e9ef08922a747c48ea.jpg

 

p11_Normandy2_sharp.thumb.jpg.688ec93e3d6154cfc2d7e2dff678fdf9.jpg

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  Two of my older brothers were serving in Europe June 6, 1944.  They were 19 and 21 years old. My oldest brother participated in the landing and was wounded two days later. He passed away in  late 1950 from complications caused by wounds.

   He had bought brand new 1949 Kaiser Frazer that he taught me how to drive. I was about 10. I drove him around a lot towards the end ( very small town) because clutch became painful for him. That was a hard car to see out of and hard to aim the way the fenders and hood were shaped. My Mom wouldn’t drive it.

   I have both of their duffel bags with names and serial numbers on them.

   Thanks to all who served.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Here is something I came across that has a slider on the photos to colourize them from black to colour.

 

D-Day in colour: Troops storm beaches, scale cliffs and swoop over occupied France in stunning unseen photos released ahead of Normandy invasion's 76th anniversary

  • Series of photos show British and US troops storming beaches and talking to members of French Resistance
  • One striking image shows Dakota C-47 transport planes releasing gliders, some snapped in half on landing
  • The pictures have been colourised for the first time by an Artificial Intelligence algorithm from MyHeritage
  • It comes as a tribute to soldiers, sailors and airmen who took part in the Normandy landings on June 6, 1944 

 

The operation was the largest amphibious invasion in world history, with over 160,000 troops landing. Some 195,700 Allied naval and merchant navy personnel in over 5,000 ships were involved. 

 

 

 

Destruction in the northern French town of Carentan after the invasion in June 1944

 

Edited by Mark Gregory (see edit history)
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My dad died two years ago at age 98. He was in WW2, but one of his neighbors in his assisted living complex was even older and stormed the beach on D-Day. Omaha Beach, I'm pretty sure.

 

That fellow was pretty humble about the experience, saying he was just one of many who did so. According to him, the real heroes never made it off the beach. 

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29 minutes ago, JamesR said:

My dad died two years ago at age 98. He was in WW2, but one of his neighbors in his assisted living complex was even older and stormed the beach on D-Day. Omaha Beach, I'm pretty sure.

 

That fellow was pretty humble about the experience, saying he was just one of many who did so. According to him, the real heroes never made it off the beach. 

 

The real heroes are ALL who served in the military for the US in WW2. Some died on the battlefield, some suffered serious injuries and died at an early age because of them (like the brother of user Jubilee), and some were lucky enough to survive until age 98 like your father who still had to live with the memories of the war. May they all rest in peace....

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My Father in Law landed on Normandy Beach and worked his way up thru the Battle of the Bulge and on to the liberation of the concentration camps, under George Patton in the 4th Armored, 704 Tank Destroyer Battalion. He never wanted to talk about the war but I can't imagine the stuff he saw.

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Dad was a mid-upper gunner on a Lancaster Bomber through 1944. Here's the entries from his Flight Log Book for June '44. Bomber Command was kept very busy. Many times after a night bombing run,there were a lot of empty spots at mess for breakfast the next morning.

E R Boland Flight Log Book June '44.jpg

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A huge thanks to all that have and do serve. I knew a fellow years ago that was a paratrooper during the June 6 invasion. He was quite proud of his service but never talked too much in detail. My grandmothers neighbor was a Navy diver that was at Pearl Harbour. For obvious reasons he never spoke a word about his service either. My wifes grandfather served in europe, we have a framed letter of commodation that was given to him for some action in Italy. Pop was a bit too young but I had a few uncles that served during the 'big one'. My one uncle was a pilot, he flew 'The Hump' during the war, also was a pilot that participated in the Berlin airlift. I will always salute our flag!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, J.H.Boland said:

Dad was a mid-upper gunner on a Lancaster Bomber through 1944. Here's the entries from his Flight Log Book for June '44. Bomber Command was kept very busy. Many times after a night bombing run,there were a lot of empty spots at mess for breakfast the next morning.

E R Boland Flight Log Book June '44.jpg

 

Any idea if Pilot Officer Stockwell made it through to the end of the war after piloting all those missions? My hat is off to him, your dad, and all the others. They are all true heroes in my book....

Edited by Lebowski (see edit history)
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Very interesting log indeed. I saw a program a couple of weeks ago about Midway. Real life footage and interviews with guys that were there (was an older program). I cant begin to imagine what they went through!

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1 hour ago, Lebowski said:

 Petty Officer Stockwell .

 

Actually that would be Pilot Officer.

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4 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

Dad was a mid-upper gunner on a Lancaster Bomber through 1944. Here's the entries from his Flight Log Book for June '44. Bomber Command was kept very busy. Many times after a night bombing run,there were a lot of empty spots at mess for breakfast the next morning.

 

 

I'd heard that the Lancaster dropped more bombs than any other bomber. Brave souls who manned those planes, and all other aircraft back then.

 

My dad was in the Navy in WW2. He joined in '41 before the the US was in the war, but he told me (later in life) that before the Navy, he actually wanted to go to Canada so he could fly Spitfires. He worked for Mid-Continent Airlines before the navy and liked planes a lot, but never pursued flying (I presume) because of his sub-standard eyesight.

 

Many thanks to your father for his bravery and sacrifice.

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8 hours ago, Lebowski said:

 

Any idea if Pilot Officer Stockwell made it through to the end of the war after piloting all those missions? My hat is off to him, your dad, and all the others. They are all true heroes in my book....

 

Pilot Officer Stockwell went on to do two more tours,a total of over ninety missions ! He became a commercial pilot after the war. In the early 1990's,my dad got in touch with the widow of an RAF officer in England who had made it a hobby of connecting up old air crew. 

Early one morning dad got a phone call. A fellow on the other end with a cockney accent chatted for a few minutes before realizing dad had no idea who it was."Stockwell here !" he said. They never physically got together again,but many letters and cards were exchanged.

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My dad was a 19 year old tank driver in WWII.  He was on guard duty in England the evening of August 5th and said the sky was full of planes going over to bomb the Germans.  He went through Normandy a week or so after the invasion, then through France, Belgium, the Netherlands and on into Germany.  He had a few stories about his time over there, but there was never any animosity in them toward the enemy combatants.  R.I.P., dad.

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My dad was a radio operator in the Navy and flew in PBY's and an assortment of planes and blimps. His plane was hit twice and once directly into his radio but he was not hurt.  After he passed and we were going thru his stuff we found a metal/decoration for the most shot at squadron in the Navy! He never left Hawaii ! They towed the practice targets for the ships heading out to the pacific.  He use to say you could tell the new guys from the experienced guys. The new guys couldn't hit anything. The experienced guys aimed and hit the tow cable just to see the long silk target sock flow down to the ocean.  Dad had it easy but someone had to do it.

 He only got upset twice about combat, once when I got drafted in 67 because he said they fought the war to end all wars and after I came home as a disabled vet and had to fight to get benefits.

I wish WW2 was the one that ended all wars. They are the greatest generation. 

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Posted (edited)

Historic occasion and most memorable instance of the Anglo / American alliance.

my father was there with a Sherman tank made by your parents or grandparents. 

Many American servicemen were in temporary barracks near where my mother lived 

New Milton in the new forest and she attended dances at the base with her older sister and had very enjoyable time and brief interlude in what were very fraught times .

would have been good to remember with them yesterday  , but sadly both gone .

Edited by Pilgrim65 (see edit history)

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I assume there is a similar service available for other countries, but our government makes available for free all records from the wars and they’re online with easy searching. Personal records also include post war information as well so you can build up a pretty comprehensive picture of someone’s life who served.
 

For my great grandfather you can find his initial rejection, signup forms, service history, wound records and war diaries from his battalion which makes for somber reading. The early entries list men’s names as they’re KIA or wounded, by the time he was wounded it was just numbers. The day he was wounded was pretty much the end of the battalion as they had been wiped out as part of second battle of the Somme (the 100 day offensive) at Montbrehain 

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My uncle would have celebrated his 18th birthday on the beach had the invasion not been delayed due to weather. June 6th he turned 93 and is doing well.

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