Buick35

Least favorite task of restoring

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Anything that involves laying on my back while debris falls into my eyes. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

With me it is big heavy parts, smash fingers and a sore back are the result.

I am surprised that anyone has not mentioned  wood working.

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12 hours ago, dictator27 said:

Woodwork, hands down.

 

I agree 100% with the above statement.

I have a wood structure in my 1931 Reo Royale Victoria that I have reproduced.

It is time consuming and takes forever.

I have done all the mechanical works and it was easy in comparison.

I envy you guys who can just pull a part off and reinstall a new old - one.

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Bodywork and paint may be the least enjoyable job,but after it’s done it’s the most rewarding,I’ve had to paint cars over because I wasn’t satisfied the first time,but when I’m assembling after paint it’s enjoyable to watch everything coming together,the least enjoyable is wood working but enjoyable when it starts coming together

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I enjoy the wood work , takes time but looks realy good when done . doing a 1929 LaSalle now . Kings32

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3 hours ago, jan arnett (2) said:

fuel system.  My wife hates that I smell like old gasoline.

I rather like the smell of old gas,it brings back the memory of when I first got my old car. I bought an old metal has can that smelled that way and thought of charging people 25 cents for a sniff at car shows.

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My least favorite task is asking someone for help when I need it. That is probably why neither of my cars are finished.

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29 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

My least favorite task is asking someone for help when I need it. That is probably why neither of my cars are finished.

 

I have a future son in law just up the street, but I hate to ask as well.

I do occasionally ask for help with heavy stuff.

He is getting better as the wedding gets closer. (daughters hand is out often these days).

I suppose he will disappear completely after that.

John, we need to get over this.

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I don't have the patience to do quality body work.

Most of my friends come to me for wiring and mechanical.

Had a pretty good deal going for awhile with a body and paint guy until he retired to the Philippines.

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The WHOLE RESTORATION PROCESS - the touring is the fun part

 

My favorite part is little pet projects, fabrication work, and assembly, as well as fine tuning in details.

 

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17 hours ago, hidden_hunter said:

close second is dealing with people that bemoan the death of hobby then want exorbitant prices for everything, yes it’s rare but so are the people needing to buy it

 

I often wonder how that effects the desire for some to even stay in the hobby in my age category? 

Dealing with these type of vermin is one of my biggest pet peeves in the hobby. We all know fair market value especially now with the internet, but some of the crotchety ole farts will take some of these parts to their graves. I just don't get how it helps anyone, especially when their family members usually sell for pennies after they pass away.

 

As for the OP question, 

I'd have to say:

Trying to find the bucket that held the lost or unknown parts I stumbled on while restoring...

For someone with OCD, the irony is brutal at times lol...

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Without a doubt, bodywork! I'll tear apart any mechanical part there is, but when it comes to rot, rust repair, dent repair  and paint, into the shop it goes.

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Posted (edited)

Removing rusty parts and finding more rust! Being in salt encrusted Ontario Canada it's a given. That's unless you buy a clean dry Arizona car. I'm working on a 1970 Chevelle that was built in Oshawa Ontario and sold new here in London Ontario. It spent the last  20 years in a dry barn, but that still leaves 30 years unaccounted for. 

mochvy 010.jpg

Edited by Ed Luddy
spelling (see edit history)

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Having to pay someone to do something I cant, i.e. motor work. I am not overly mechanically inclined and have yet to build a motor. I am gonna try on my current project. I enjoy most aspects of restoration work. I enjoy doing body work and paint very much. I like having a finished car better though. I am a master carpenter of 40 + years, and also dabble in building high end period reproduction furniture. I would love to have the chance to do woodwork on an old car. Especially would like to build a 'woodie' from scratch.

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I'm sorry but no one has answered the question correctly. Think about it guys, the toughest part of any restoration bar non, is explaining to your WIFE where the money went!!!!!!!! Restoration is a walk in the park , asking wifey for another check is the worst part period!!!!

 

brasscaqrguy

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10 minutes ago, brasscarguy said:

I'm sorry but no one has answered the question correctly. Think about it guys, the toughest part of any restoration bar non, is explaining to your WIFE where the money went!!!!!!!! Restoration is a walk in the park , asking wifey for another check is the worst part period!!!!

 

brasscaqrguy

Well, You certainly  don't have an understanding wife... Rule number one. Never let them have total control of your check book. Dandy Dave! 

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Posted (edited)

I will donate my 1917 Olds as a pattern for you to fartknock around with to do the woodwork and metal if you really want to hone your skills. Of course Id like it back when your done.

Edited by deaddds
Not complete (see edit history)

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8 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Removing rusty parts and finding more rust! Being in salt encrusted Ontario Canada it's a given. That's unless you buy a clean dry Arizona car. I'm working on a 1970 Chevelle that was built in Oshawa Ontario and sold new here in London Ontario. It spent the last  20 years in a dry barn, but that still leaves 30 years unaccounted for. 

mochvy 010.jpg

 

Okay... it is simply WRONG to post a picture of the hood.  Let’s see the rest of the car!

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There is nothing I don’t like about restoring a vehicle... the entire process is therapy for me.  As a professor, I think for a living.  The tasks associated with my day to day work activities are mentally draining, and when I need a break, nothing is more fun than to head out to the garage and turn on the other half of my brain.  Honestly, and I mean this sincerely; everything from cleaning an undercarriage with a power sprayer and being covered with globs of grease from head to foot to driving the car I restore is equally fun for me.

 

Restoration == Therapy

 

All this said, there is one thing on a vehicle I have never done: paint and body work.  It isn’t that I don’t like it, it is simply that I think it is an art learned over time, and I don’t want any of my vehicles to be at the start of the learning curve.  🙂

 

Joe

 

 

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2 hours ago, Joe West said:

 

Okay... it is simply WRONG to post a picture of the hood.  Let’s see the rest of the car!

 

mochvy 009.jpg

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The Data Tag will give you lots of info! It's an Oshawa Car so gives lots of details to the build

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Posted (edited)
On 6/6/2020 at 3:20 AM, Dandy Dave said:

For me it is Sandblasting big parts outside on a hot day while suited up like an astronaut, and then being pelted with sand and rust from about every direction. Hot, Dirty, Nasty job but necessary for a proper frame off restoration of most anything. That's my final answer. Dandy Dave!  

 Actually, I love sand blasting.

 For anyone who has had to scrape and sand a frame by hand, it is like having a magic wand that makes every thing beautiful.

 It is so easy that I let my mind wander, thinking about how nice it will look after painting, knowing that the paint will stick and last.

 

 (Of coarse it helps that I have a 30 hp comp. and a 300# sandblaster with a 3/8" nozzle)

Edited by Roger Walling (see edit history)
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My first car was funded mostly through 'found money'. I cashed in over $2k in scrap metal during that time. And whatever spare change I could come up with. Sometimes taking months and months at saving $20 a week from lunch money!  The downside of this is that it takes an incredibly long time to get the job done (over 5 yrs). The upside is that when the car was finished I had zero debt with it. I never had to haggle with my wife over expense. I DID buy here a new mustang convertible when it was done to appease the natives, so to speak.

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