pesd

Front right wheel bearing noise?

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Hi gang,

Just started developing a whining noise front right wheel area, slightly turn left and it stops. took it to my tire guy thinking it might need alignment, he thinks its the wheel bearing.

Thinking of doing it myself until I just looked at the blue manual which makes it seem very complicated with many special tools removing the the complete hub and knuckle assembly.

 

I've done a couple wheel bearing replacements on other cars many years ago without a manual and dont remember it being that difficult/complicated. That being said, is it easier than it looks, do I need all the special tools?

If its going to be a real PITA, I will bring it to my local garage, though I like to do as much work as possible myself, I'm not up for another challenge lately. A little over a year ago you guys helped me replace the turbo and all the front seals two days ago I just bled the brakes and replaced the gearbox oil. 

Just looked at Rock auto, maybe a bearing and hub kit might be the way to go.

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

Thx, Peter

 

89 DOHC 17K

   

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My experience with wheel bearings going out is that if you make a turn and the side that loads makes noise, it probably is bad.

 

To do our wheel bearings, the level of difficulty depends on your experience and access to shop tools. The bearing is pressed into the upright on these cars, so you need a press (or be very creative) to swap the actual part. Everything else can be done with hand tools and a torque wrench. Maybe a little cussing.

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Thanks, I'm good at cussing

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5 hours ago, pesd said:

Hi gang,

Just started developing a whining noise front right wheel area, slightly turn left and it stops. took it to my tire guy thinking it might need alignment, he thinks its the wheel bearing.

Thinking of doing it myself until I just looked at the blue manual which makes it seem very complicated with many special tools removing the the complete hub and knuckle assembly.

 

I've done a couple wheel bearing replacements on other cars many years ago without a manual and dont remember it being that difficult/complicated. That being said, is it easier than it looks, do I need all the special tools?

If its going to be a real PITA, I will bring it to my local garage, though I like to do as much work as possible myself, I'm not up for another challenge lately. A little over a year ago you guys helped me replace the turbo and all the front seals two days ago I just bled the brakes and replaced the gearbox oil. 

Just looked at Rock auto, maybe a bearing and hub kit might be the way to go.

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

Thx, Peter

 

89 DOHC 17K

   

If the whining noise is actually in the right front hub bearing, the stopping of the whining on a 'slightly left turn' indicates a bad race on the inner side of the bearing. What sort of noise do you get on a slight RIGHT turn? It should increase in volume.  With such low miles showing on your car, I actually doubt that the problem is a hub bearing.

 

The hub bearing on the TC automobiles, 89-91, are NOT the type that have a bolt in retainer and a complete new hub, (HUB KIT). It is the early type which requires only the purchase of the hub bearing itself and then requiring all the tools and the press to press the bearing out of the 'upright and then the hub out of the bearing. Afterwards, pressing the new bearing in.

I would NOT recommend that you try this yourself. No amount of "cussing" will get the job done without the proper tools.

If a parts store has and will lend you the tool kit required, it is possible to do it without an actual press at home, but it is no fun.

I had one of those 'special tool kits' when I had my repair shop. Most often though, I opted to have it done by an automotive machine shop.

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Thanks Hemi,

I suspected you would chime in with your expertise.

I'm surprised that it could be a bearing also but a couple mechanics I know say it happens??

straight a little whining, turn right a little more even slightly to the left no noise.

I do have a couple friends with presses but I ordered a part listed under Rock Auto under 89 Chrysler Maserati DOHC

But Im getting it from Amazon because if its not right its free returns, I've had problems with Rock Auto returns in the past.

Timken 518502

Should have it in a week or  so,  then I'll mach them up, if they dont match up I'll have a shop do it. 

Thanks for the advise, I'll let you know. 

image.png

image.png

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Hello again, yes, you are showing the later bearing kit that the later FWD Chrysler cars use. If you were to acquire a later year model “knuckle” as it is referred to to the service manuals, UPRIGHT as referred to in earlier writing here, from a LeBaron or Daytona you could use that bearing kit. I have not done such a conversion, so I cannot say which can be exchanged without any other changes. Someone here may be able to advise you.

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On 6/6/2020 at 11:45 AM, Hemi Dude said:

Hello again, yes, you are showing the later bearing kit that the later FWD Chrysler cars use. If you were to acquire a later year model “knuckle” as it is referred to to the service manuals, UPRIGHT as referred to in earlier writing here, from a LeBaron or Daytona you could use that bearing kit. I have not done such a conversion, so I cannot say which can be exchanged without any other changes. Someone here may be able to advise you.

Hemi, I think that is actually the right part. It looks like it has a little dust shield or something depicted in the picture, but it is the press-in style.

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I guess you will find out when you receive the bearing kit. Let us know.

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Reaper,

Thanks for your help and contribution but I think Hemi is correct and I'm wrong.

Yesterday a friend of mine suggested that I check the load on the wheel nut, which I immediately thought was a great idea and could be a quick fix him knowing that I had to disassemble that whole front right assembly to replace my turbo and all the front seals.

He was correct, though my torque only goes up to 150fp it spun a little before it clicked, Im guessing it was at around 120 -130. cranked it down a lot more pressing the load but wound up with no difference, still whining. While I was in there I looked at the assembly and as Hemi mentioned there is an upper arm on the knuckle that means unfortunately it will involve much more than extracting three stubborn bolts a replacing the hub assembly. Its going into the shop Tuesday morning estimate of $450 including alignment.

I feel bad not tackling it myself but I have a lot of other projects piling up right now.

Thanks again,

 I'll let you know how it goes

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I meant to post this image of the upper arimage.png.e18ab3586df9911a05dd94a6a3a50f81.pngm that Hemi refers to.

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Was that nut ever taken off before? Why was it loose? They are held in position by a capture washer and cotter pin.

 

Keep the new bearing on hand, because is is possible to greatly reduce the life of wheel bearings by driving without the right preload. I hope not, but it's possible that it might go out anyway, now. :(

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I think we can all learn a little here, that includes ME.

As I checked RockAuto for hub bearings, I realized that since I last replaced a hub bearing, that a "KIT" for the older 'press in bearings' has been produced.

The 518502 Timken Axle Bearing and Hub Assembly shown above is in fact the way to go.  Pressing out the old hub and bearing and pressing in the new Assembly would seem to indicate that the pressure required to install the new bearing into the knuckle would be totally applied against the ball-bearings themselves.

That use to be considered a no-no in the past, but apparently it is not these days.

I think it advisable to say that you should thoroughly clean the cavity in the knuckle with steel-wool or sandpaper and then coat it with vaseline, grease or anti-seize in order for the bearing to slide into the knuckle with the least amount of resistance.

For sure though, you cannot hammer the assembly in. That would certainly damage the bearing race if not the ball-bearings themselves. 

Let us know if any of you have personally done such a hub bearing replacement using this style kit.

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2 hours ago, Hemi Dude said:

I think we can all learn a little here, that includes ME.

As I checked RockAuto for hub bearings, I realized that since I last replaced a hub bearing, that a "KIT" for the older 'press in bearings' has been produced.

The 518502 Timken Axle Bearing and Hub Assembly shown above is in fact the way to go.  Pressing out the old hub and bearing and pressing in the new Assembly would seem to indicate that the pressure required to install the new bearing into the knuckle would be totally applied against the ball-bearings themselves.

That use to be considered a no-no in the past, but apparently it is not these days.

I think it advisable to say that you should thoroughly clean the cavity in the knuckle with steel-wool or sandpaper and then coat it with vaseline, grease or anti-seize in order for the bearing to slide into the knuckle with the least amount of resistance.

For sure though, you cannot hammer the assembly in. That would certainly damage the bearing race if not the ball-bearings themselves. 

Let us know if any of you have personally done such a hub bearing replacement using this style kit.

Hemi, I even learned something here! I suppose it helps to read the description of the part! LOL DOH! So, yes, it is correct that you do not want to install a bearing by pushing on the inner race. BUT, they have designed this thing in such a way that the hub is now ALSO the inner race! Makes me think it's a whole different design internally. And thinking about it, isn't this the way the bolt-in hubs are, just instead of the outer race being this press fit part it's the cast, bolt-in housing?

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Thanks Hemi & Reaper,

I got it back from the shop yesterday, I guess they disassembled pressed in a new bearing, reassembled, and aligned the front end. Smooth like butter, straight as an arrow with nothing but the engine purring.

I'm very pleased but annoyed with myself for farming out this repair. When the left front goes I'll try the hub kit, hopefully not to soon.  

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1 hour ago, pesd said:

Thanks Hemi & Reaper,

I got it back from the shop yesterday, I guess they disassembled pressed in a new bearing, reassembled, and aligned the front end. Smooth like butter, straight as an arrow with nothing but the engine purring.

I'm very pleased but annoyed with myself for farming out this repair. When the left front goes I'll try the hub kit, hopefully not to soon.  

You initially wrote '89 DOHC 17K' that is no mileage at all. Hard to figure how that bearing went bad. It may have been bad from the start or someone slammed that right front wheel along the way. I'm still on my original wheel bearings at 280K+.

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22 hours ago, Hemi Dude said:

You initially wrote '89 DOHC 17K' that is no mileage at all. Hard to figure how that bearing went bad. It may have been bad from the start or someone slammed that right front wheel along the way. I'm still on my original wheel bearings at 280K+.

I suggest making sure your engine to chassis ground straps are making good contact. I read through the years a person was having problems eating wheel bearings and it turned out that erosion due to electrolysis because of a bad ground was the root cause! Strange one, for sure, but something to beware of.

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Thanks Reaper,

Next time I'm working on it I'll check the ground straps.

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