Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Apologize if something has been posted on this as I'm generally in the Buick Forums. I was not aware of these cars and I live within 15 miles of where they were located. Thought maybe you Ford guys and gals would be interested in knowing of their existence.

 

 https://triblive.com/local/valley-news-dispatch/ati-removes-priceless-stainless-steel-cars-from-harrison-plant-plans-to-auction-them/

 

 

2676880_web1_vnd-atistainlesscars3-052820.jpg

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, thanks for posting, JZRIV. I had heard about the stainless '36 Ford - in fact, I told some neighbors with a '36 Ford about it a while back - but I had no idea that the Continentals and T-Birds were also made.

 

I agree with the sentiment expressed by someone in the in the article: it's a shame to break up the collection, but I'm also sorry that a large American company is on the ropes due to the coronavirus pandemic. Like someone said, however, even if the cars sold for a million each, it would have little impact on the financial health of such a large company. I suppose large companies can't lobby the gov't for bailouts or aid if they keep and maintain an expensive car collection.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

I wonder how much tweaking had to be done to make these with the production tooling?  I can't imagine special tools were made for making 1 copy.  I would assume the stamping dies are designed to over bend things a little to account for spring back and for the strength of mild steel.   Stainless is typically harder to bend and drill holes in, etc.  I'm no expert on these things.  I'll bet someone here has sheet metal press experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Stainless is not harder to bend or drill.  The property of stainless which fools us is that it work hardens very quickly.  Thus, take shallow cuts with a drill, the generated heat hardens the stainless.  You have to take deep cuts, to cut beyond the surface hardening.

 

I would think the same would apply to panel tooling.  Done BAM quickly it probably doesn’t have a chance to work harden enough to affect end result.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What many do not know is that the floor pans for these cars were just mild steel, not stainless, so rust could very well be an issue. Trimacar is correct. Stainless is quick to work harden. We make convertible top irons from stainless and we have to be very careful when installing rivets. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...