Jump to content

What are these things above the windshield wipers on my 1936 Chrysler Airstream Convertible C-8?


Recommended Posts

Hi All,

I have asked a Chrysler expert what the items located right above my windshield wipers are (see attached images) but he did not know... and he knows virtually everything. ¬†ūüôā

 

So... can anyone offer any guidance regarding what these pieces may have been for.  If you look closely at the driver’s side part, you can see a small rubber grommet which is missing on the passenger side part.  Any help identifying what these parts are associated with and what they would have been used for is much appreciated.

 

Thanks so much.

 

By the way, I have absolutely no idea why these images are rotated, or how to rotate them on the forum.  They are oriented properly (portrait mode) on my iphone, just exactly as they were taken.

 

Joe

9775ED40-1ECB-46EA-AEAD-70348815FF8D.jpeg

3DDA247B-E846-4D5A-9CDD-E059A589D211.jpeg

B075136F-3B56-48B3-A795-CB31EA17A2D0.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know the closed cars have the wipers mounted above the windshield, so there was always downward pressure on the arm. I seem to remember years ago when I was a kid, my Dad took me to look at one of those 1936 Airstream 8 convertibles and it had springs holding the wiper arms to the windshield. Have never seen any since then. I guess the only way to find out what they are is to peruse the 1936 Chrysler factory parts book to see if the brackets or springs are mentioned.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, hwellens said:

There are springs that fit in there to hold the wipers against the windshield. Look at the parts book for a 38 Dodge convertible.

dodge conv.jpg

IMG_20200604_0001.jpg

That is what I remember seeing....

1938 Dodge_Convertible_Coupe (2).jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I know the closed cars have the wipers mounted above the windshield, so there was always downward pressure on the arm. I seem to remember years ago when I was a kid, my Dad took me to look at one of those 1936 Airstream 8 convertibles and it had springs holding the wiper arms to the windshield. Have never seen any since then. I guess the only way to find out what they are is to peruse the 1936 Chrysler factory parts book to see if the brackets or springs are mentioned.

I guess my 67 year old memory served me well.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They actually don't add any extra pressure.   They are apparently only used on some early convertible cars that had a very "chopped" height windshield, like the 34 LaS. 

 

If you study the enlarged picture that Keiser31 posted,  you can see that the wiper blade itself is also special, as it has an attached guide tube for the small diameter rod, acting like a trombone slide.   The whole point of this very advanced setup, is that the rod continuously changes the angle of the blade compared to the angle of the main wiper arm as it goes to both extremes.  (like modern cars)

 

With such a short windshield , a normal blade setup could not clear the same amount of the glass because you'd have to have  a very limited sweep of degrees before the lower tip of the blade hits the lower part of the windshield gasket in both extremes.  Study the pic and you can imagine that when the main arm is pointing straight up, that is the only point when the arm is aligned perfectly straight to the blade. 

 

Then as you go to full left or right, the blade changes it's angle compared to the arm,  and now it's also clearing more glass area because it can sweep more total degrees..  This articulation also allows the blade's "park position" to be much  lower out of your sightline, and also parking them horizontally,

 

I had no idea that Mopar used these, and now I wonder how many other short windshield convertibles used it besides the 34 LaS (for only one year of LaS, I believe)

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, F&J said:

They actually don't add any extra pressure.   They are apparently only used on some early convertible cars that had a very "chopped" height windshield, like the 34 LaS. 

 

If you study the enlarged picture that Keiser31 posted,  you can see that the wiper blade itself is also special, as it has an attached guide tube for the small diameter rod, acting like a trombone slide.   The whole point of this very advanced setup, is that the rod continuously changes the angle of the blade compared to the angle of the main wiper arm as it goes to both extremes.  (like modern cars)

 

With such a short windshield , a normal blade setup could not clear the same amount of the glass because you'd have to have  a very limited sweep of degrees before the lower tip of the blade hits the lower part of the windshield gasket in both extremes.  Study the pic and you can imagine that when the main arm is pointing straight up, that is the only point when the arm is aligned perfectly straight to the blade. 

 

Then as you go to full left or right, the blade changes it's angle compared to the arm,  and now it's also clearing more glass area because it can sweep more total degrees..  This articulation also allows the blade's "park position" to be much  lower out of your sightline, and also parking them horizontally,

 

I had no idea that Mopar used these, and now I wonder how many other short windshield convertibles used it besides the 34 LaS (for only one year of LaS, I believe)

 

 

EXCELLENT information! Thanks. Now that you mentioned that tube, it does bring back memories of seeing them on that car years ago. It was a very original car. I have never seen them on any other make or model.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Outstanding research everyone.... I looked at hundreds of images on Google trying to see any detail associated with those brackets and struck out. ¬†I would have definitely given up until I ran across an actual example at a car show. ¬†Now... off to find me some guide rods. ¬†ūüôā

 

LOL... righhhhhttttttttttttt

 

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...