BqUICK

Electra GSX Road Racer

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FORD 9" Nodular Case, 31 Spline Moser Axles, Daytona Bearing Support with addition of a new spool for drag use.

Road race limited slip unit is being prepared with a 3.33 ratio for sustained high speeds in conjunction with Gear Vendors electric overdrive.

Installing rear end housing today -4 degrees pinion angle. Machuga Racing Chassis owner, Dave Machuga, will drop by the shop this week to do the final set up.

T-6 Days to our 2006 roll out at George M. Divins Elementary school! (We drag 1/8 mile at Skyview Dragway in Tioga New York that night!)

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God Speed,

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I suppose I've had my fair share of fun (or heart ache) over the past few weeks with this project. We are trying to make a stab at quarter mile work with a car not really designed for that sort of thing. Our Electra GSX road racer is just that, a road racer. Nearly rock hard suspension (1000lb springs in front/275lbs per inch in the rear!) great for a road racer that weighs in at exactly 4455 lbs(no kidding) empty. With a driver and navigator, for our rally chores, count on 5000 to 5,100 lbs with 32 gallons of fuel on board.

Anyway, I did all the stuff my guru said to do. Soften the springs, enhance the front travel, adjust pinion angle to zero then incementally adjust till she hooks, get taller tires, get spool, make your tach work, higher stall converter, new cluthces (Red-Line Competition) manual valve body, rework your shifter. My hand was swollen and sore from all the wrenching over the past two weeks!

The exhaust was shortened and about 70lbs was lost here. The front anti-sway bar removed, the two rear TENZO rally seats removed, the long (30') tranny cooler lines to the back bumper were removed too! SHE HAS SHED ABOUT 110 LBS WHICH IS GOOD FOR ABOUT 1/10!

The alignment was the fun part. Now the car has to be aligned front AND rear. I used a laser to help some and finally got the car to the point where she will drive straight and there is minimal drag due to mis-alignment. I can actually push her in either direction with ONE HAND! It used to take a couple of guys to push this thing anywhere!!!

We are putting in some Olds Cutlass springs and stock Electra shocks. The springs should be here today. They will help with the body rotation and weight transfer so that we can finally put some power to the ground!

Thanks for hanging in there and reading my story! It encourages me to know that people are out there who care enough to check in from time to time.

May God Speed you safely on your way in a BUICK! <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

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Thanks for keeping us updated, Michael. You sure have some purdy parts there! Now, as for drag racing this car--I can only surmise that: Once a street hero, always a street hero! Although you may be learning some more about the car and how it will perform as a road-racer, setting it up to drag is just kind of puzzling <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/confused.gif" alt="" /> Don't get me wrong, I completely respect your dedication to make your road-racer double as a 1/4-mile screamer, but do you have any other possible hidden agenda that might explain WHY you're going to all this trouble? Otherwise, I'm stumped! <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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GS,

As you know we are setting up for a long distance high speed trial. The Faithful Pursuit must get up to 150 - 170 mph and high speed cruise. We built a car cabable of road course as this was the experience of the chassis designers and fabricators here in the Southern Tier, NY.

In order to test this capability, the only way to "run through the gears" is to do it in a quarter mile with 4.11 ratio. This way we can engage all six speeds and see whether more work is required. There are no multi mile courses anywhere near here and I cannot drive on the highway anywhere near our operational high speed cruise.

Our quarter mile testing in 2005 at the New York International Raceway Park provided valuable information which led to the decision to remove and fully rebuild a "new" transmission with less than 200 miles on it. I would not have been able to justify the incredible cost without some track experience.

A transmission blown at 170 mph 45 miles from anywhere in the Nevada desert would have been messy! Running a few quarter miles maxing out power and rpms has already been worth the price of admission!!!!

We dealt with perhaps 10 major issues that were uncovered at the drag races. Leaky rear axle seals were one of the problems that reared its ugly head and was apparent after a few passes. (The dirt and track dust helped to indicate all the placeds that the oil had been slung!) replaced with high tech expanding bushing types.

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Improper rear ens setup resulted in bent shock brackets that were replaced a few weeks ago. The horizontal rod, Panhard Bar, helps to "locate" the rear, keeping it in the proper lateral location. As the ride height rises and falls the rod rotates about a center located on the driver's side frame rail. This rotation governs some slight lateral movement of the rear. The rear was set up incorrectly in our rush to drive the thing to our 2004 roll out for the Tuskegee Airmen. We took a few hard turns and "clunk bangs" occurred!! Thankfully nothing expensive was damaged!

Powder coated rear, industrial hard coated chromoly steel 5 bar suspension. Specially treated to eliminate hydrogen embrittlement woes of ordinary chrome plating.

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How many years have we searched for a solution to the BUICK big car rotor/spindle crisis. Here I was on my last .001 of usable brake rotor thickness when out of sheer despiration I ordered a set of 1971 Buick Electra rotors, right, to machine out to 1969 spindle specifications. You see, in 1967 - 1970 the discs were a rare option and you cannot find replacement rotors. The Bendix calipers were clunky, weighed 29 lbs, and were often discarded for the old reliable aluminum alloy drums!

Only 1971 and up Electra rotors are made today. Since both inner and outer bearing races are in different locations, this would have required brake rotor machining (probably $800 worth at least) to relocate the bearings slightly. This mod would still require that the brake brackets on the spindles be modified as well. (Another $200)

As luck would have it, I finally found a solution! The photos of the beefier 1.125" thick rotors are similar to the ones that will be coming within the next week or so. These units are cross drilled, with brake cleaning slots, and high nickel content. NOW we will finally have SAFE brakes. Sure, our pals at any number of uber brake houses would have been happy to sell us brakes tailor made to our car ($6,000.00 was one quote! No kidding!)

We are a low-budget, relatively speaking, operation. I'll spend $6k on a motor before I'll do it on 4 rotors and calipers! (Call me crazy but I think its highway robbery!)

These new rotors will cost about $200 because they are actually CHEVY 1/2 TON TRUCK ROTORS!!! Here's the funny part. I first ordered a single '71 rotor to check out what would be required to make the setup work. When I ordered the second rotor to begin the machining process, Chevy truck rotor came in the box by accident. It had the identical Buick ID number but it was a noticibly different and even more massive Chevy truck unit. I tried it on just for laughs (wierd stuff makes me happy sometimes) and it actually fit!!!

Now to be honest, I had heard that this swap could fit. One of the bad boy brake companies let it slip that that is how they got around the stickey Electra issue! I did not run out and try it myself because I have been on too many wild goose chases which wound up being a load of hooey. And besides, if it worked, how come nobody out in Buick land knew anything about it????

Anyway, a high performance outfit remakes these units in drilled, slotted, configuration designed for high performance! Buick brakes at Chevy prices! Score one for the Gipper!!!!

<img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" /> 31370101_1638-med.jpg

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That's an interesting parts find that you can now share with others (you don't owe the custom brake folks any special courtesies IMO). It just goes to show there's nothing like tenacity to solve problems for low prices. Unfortunately, when you get under the gun for deadlines, the stories are more like the previous one. Say, does that shoe come with the car? <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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The re-worked transmission, torque convereter, and spool work together as tight as the Bow of Oddysseus!

As a young person I read the story of the Greek hero whose bow was so difficult to string, no one else but he could do it. Finally, some really great positive shifts to red-line that feel tight! I was humming the tune to "Rocky" when I got home!

Hopefully, after a little work, I'll be at the track on Friday if the weather holds.

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We loaded up the trailer, packed in 8 people and drove 1.5 hours to our nearest 1/4 mile track. The weather was great and they were drying it out from the afternoon rains. Five other passes were made as I waited behind a long line of "MOMS" racers. Mustang Owner..???...???. We did not make one run before the clouds swept in from the north-west and closed us down!

Well, my wife asked are you disappointed after all that work? Only partly, you see there are so many parts to this dance that went well not actually running on the track and racing a few guys (or girls) is not all bad.

We tested the car at home, trying new suspension geometries, used a new fuel mix (Aviation 100 + Mobil 93 33/66 mix), trained Ben and Martin on how to strap down the BUICK, entertained everyone, fed everyone, got there safely, trained on parking, unloading, and I even met a couple of Buick people and got some great tech advice. So it certainly was not a total loss by any means. The better I can grow my crew, the less support work I have to do and the more I can focus on the car and driving. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

God Speed,

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Have a great 4th and say a kind word to a veteran, especially those from "Dubya-Dubya Aye-Aye, The Big One!"

God Speed

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Great shot of the Faithful Pursuit!

One really cool part of your dragstrip post: "Drove to the track"! <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

Remembering my dad, Anton L. Strauss--37090902 T42 43 A (I have his dog tags, dress jacket, and wool coat). In his WWII service, he was stationed at Victorville (now George) AFB in Victorville CA for the duration. Tech Sergeant, hangar chief, flew "test" flights of B24 bombers with just him, pilot and copilot "to find out if there was really something wrong with the plane" and lived to tell the tale(s).

Victorville was a training base for B24 bomber pilots, bombardiers, and crews. The B24 flew between 200 and 300 miles an hour, carrying up to 8,800 pounds of bombs. The Army Air Forces instruction manual put it this way: "The B24 has guts... It can carry a bigger bomb load farther and faster day in and day out, than any warplane..." (this was published prior to the introduction of the B29, of course).

They were good planes, but unforgiving of mistakes. Sadly, many men lost their lives training out in the Mojave desert, and elsewhere. 824 airmen died stateside in 1943 alone in B24 accidents.

For more of the story, read "Wild Blue" by Stephen Ambrose. He maintains that the part played in WWII by the B24 has been overlooked by many historians--there were more B24s built than any other U.S. war plane in WWII, and they bombed Axis military and industrial installations, playing a very large role in the defeat of the Nazi regime in Germany. Remember how Hitler's army "ran out of gas?" The B24 was by far the dominant bomber used in air raids on Axis oil refineries in eastern Europe, flying from bases in Italy to fight what became known as "the forgotten war."

I'm just posting here to help people remember. No need to flag-wave, the crews (in the planes and on the ground) just did their job, and many of them didn't relish it.

Guess who built radial engines used in B24 airplanes? If you guessed Buick, you're right!

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The Tuskegee Airmen, Inc., Newburgh, NY Chapter put on a very nice neighborhood picnic in Newburgh, New York last weekend. Hundreds of area residents and youth attended the program under the leadership of Chapter President Glen Frazier.

Our Faithful Pursuit team was requested to drive 200 miles to the festivities. Upon arrival and set up of our tent, I drove the TAI Chapter president, Glen Frazier for a few laps around the park in the Faithful Pursuit! We roared around the neighborhoods letting everyone know something big was happening at the park. Many attendees later stopped by our display and bought our tee shirts and said they had to come once they heard our engine! The 8 of us who visited had a great time.

WWII Tuskegee Airmen pilots Humphrey Patton and Bill Wheeler, pictured with the Faithful Pursuit, were present as well. The veterans spoke to the visitors about thier exploits during WWII. Both men flew fighters during the war and have time in P-47 and P-51 aircraft.

The Tuskegee Airmen entered the war in 1943 flying P-40 and P-39 aircraft in coastal patrol duty in North Africa. Their top notch work here earned them an opportunity to perform fighter escort work for the Daylight Strategic Bombing effort underway in Europe in Italy in the spring of 1944.

The massive P-47 Thunderbolt was their first Red Tail fighter escort aircraft. Fighter escort was critical to the Daylight Strategic Bombing initiative as it ensured the safety of B-17s, B-24s, and other bombers fighting their way toward industrial targets in Nazi Germany or other strategic locations. If you stop the enemy from making weapons, you stop his ability to wage war. Its that simple. The tough part is the Nazis had the toughest air force in the world and they were determined to stop us at all cost.

The tougher thing for the Tuskegee Airmen was that they were hated by the all White American bomber crews because they were black. (It sounds silly now, but that is how it was back in '44) After a few missions however, the bomber guys realized that the Red Tails were not losing any bombers and that their white buddies were getting shot up over targets and not coming home when escorted by the white fighter escort pilots.

After a while, the Blacks were highly sought after and "requested" for this extremely dangerous work. (66 of our boys were killed and 33 were captured doing escort)It is also rumored that a fist fight broke out in one of the bomber planning meetings over just who would get us to fly escort! If you wanted to live, you got the the Black Red Tailed fighters on your side!

They won many victories, including the victory over racism, and then transitioned from the mighty Thunderbolt, affectionately called the "Jug", to the longer ranging P-51 Mustang in the summer of 1944. The Tuskegee Airmen never lost a bomber that they escorted to enemy fighter action. No other fighter group on any side in any war has matched their record. You can thank the "Old Man", then Col. B. O. Davis, Jr. He was West Point Class of '36 tough as nails and told the men "If you break formation to go after individual Nazi fighters without permission, you will be court martialed before your wheels touch the ground" He contended that: We will be the best fighter escort group, period.

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Original Tuskegee Airmen Humphrey Patton and Bill Wheeler, both WWII fighter pilots with Faithful Pursuit

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Jegs sent 150 lbs/in coil overs on Friday which were installed on Saturday. After the 275s, then 200s, we are finally seeing some body rotation and tire hook up! The engine actually bogged a little upon application of power on dry pavement and tire hook!!! To be honest, she did break the tires loose first then upon re-appliction of power with a 5-10mph roll, she hooked. With track conditions being much stickier, I trust that she will now hook on initial launch.

We will see what she does at the track this week, provided the weather cooperates. I believe that I predicted 12.5 sec @ 105 mph, based upon the suspension, and other mods, good traction and no engine mods.

The body rotates back slightly then rises nicely with low speed applications of power in first and second gears. This means that the suspension is actually absorbing engine energy now instead of allowing it to be lost through immediate wheel spin.

We will load the converter to 1,200 to 1,500 rpm; get our light then drop the hammer fully and see what happens. The new EDGE 2,800 stall converter and suspension should help her get through the low rpm bog area, thus providing a solid launch. 1.9 or so 60' times would be great given our heavy car, lack of drag slicks(we are using D-7 Compound PIRELLI P-ZERO road race slicks!), and relatively low stall setup.

<img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

God Speed

PS: We went to "Consumer's Square" in Horseheads/Elmira on Saturday where hundreds of street rods gather every Saturday afternoon/evening. There was a Ford GT, T-Buckets, '59 Caddy, Pontiac Chieftain, the new Saturn sports car, and lots of other rods and restos! We had several people come over and talk to us about our car and the Tuskegee Airmen. The HBO movie "Tuskegee Airmen" was on recently and many people made good comments about it. We even had a few military people just back from Iraq who stopped by our Buick tribute to the Tuskegee Airmen. There were a few short videos of the Electra GSX but no photos. I hope that we can sho some action videos at some point!

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We finally got to the the track after being rained out a couple weeks ago and were having other delays. My son captured some nice head to head action video with our '69 Buick Electra and a 2006 Mustang! We beat him by a 2 tenths or so on our first pass. After an initial 14.30 and 13.4, we heated the slicks, found the groove, and put the power to her and got...

<span style="font-weight: bold">12.99 Sec. at 102.95 mph!!! </span> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

Best 60' 1.88 sec.

Estimated

0 - 60mph 4.27 Sec.

0 - 100mph 12.25 Sec.

We now rank #3 in the 50 Fastest Cars (1960's &'70's) '66 427 Cobra, '66 427 Vette, '70 GS Stage 1 are the top three. We are just ahead of the GS with our Electra GSX Stage!

Not bad for a 4,700lb 1969 Buick Electra 225 that was a scrap pile four years ago.

We suspect that there is still some wheelspin and that we are running a little lean. My 12.5 & 105 prediction still stands, we will see if we can get there!

Thanks for all of your support and well wishes. You hung in there checking this site even when it seemed that we had built a dog! Now we have proven to everyone that the classiest Buick of the period, the flagship of the line, can outrun Mustangs, Hemi's, Rat Motored SS cars with real CLASS!

God Speed,

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Buster,

Thanks for your comments. We may be able to squeeze out more performance with some carb and suspension tuning. I really find it amazing how much impact the 60' foot times are as a predictor of 1/4 mile performance. If we can launch consistently, we have a shot at the 12.5.

Here are some photos of our last time at the track!

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God Speed,

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We saddled up again for NYIRP in Mount Morris, NY. After working on a few technical problems, the Faithful Pursuit did a fine job. Problem... two days prior we found that one of her slicks was flat after recieving a nail somewhere. The slicks are very sticky and pick up everything on the road.

Still wanting to do atleast demo runs for a sponsor visiting from Virginia, we went back to the 235/35-17's that could not give us grip when the rear clutches glazed. There were probably some 2.2 60' times with the one wheel peel last year. On Friday however, after heating the tires up a few times we were in the 1.9 second range! (The spool helps!)

I made five passes, winning 2 out of five. I raced a fantastic '71 Cougar that ran mid 12s. I got the holeshot with a .5XX light and led him for most of the run. This was my best time. The white Cougar had fat race slicks, external battery, skinnies up front and was a stock appearing car pretty much everywhere else. I was pleased to run against him in test and tune, even though I lost by .4 or so.

One of my Virginia friends, Cal, video taped the run from mid-track. He was impressed with the Cougar and actually did not see me in the near lane as I was out of his view finder range. He videod the Cougar launch with serious nose lift

and as the cars pass I flashed into view with the Electra GSX, leading him.

The Cougar, was a much faster car as he ran 12.5 @ 90mph! He shut down before the end of the run and still beat me. I suspect him to be an 11 second car, however on hist first run of the night wanting to be careful he slowed down. The video of the race is really striking however and when I get it on disk perhaps all of you can see it.

We took a few photos at the burnout box, at the tree, etc. I'll post those soon.

Thanks for reading!

God Speed,

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Michael,

Thanks for posting these pics, and keeping us up to date on progress. I was WAITING for a glamour shot of the Faithful Pursuit like the one in your previous post. Can you say wallpaper??? <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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The 3.33 and traction lock combo is primarily a road race setup. Last year we had zero success hooking up with the Traction Lock and the 4.11. Its locking is based upon clutch engagement, unlike a Detroit Locker that has a positive engagement of teeth.

We will try a few drag style launches but at this point we do not know what the outcome will be. Gary Tyler, our differential expert worked on this problem and hopefully there will be better hookup and balance of power to the ground.

This weekend we do our first attempt at road course. It is a short pylon course sponsored by the BMW club of Rochester, NY. We will see how she responds. The Traction Lock is superior to a spool in road racing applications.

The course can be completed in 50 - 60 seconds. Our driver, Roy Hopkins has posted the best times of the BMW group, about 52 seconds. We will see how the huge Buick handles a course typically set up for tiny rally race BMW 325s, 2002s, etc.

God Speed,

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This Sunday we trailerd the Faithful Pursuit to a BMW Club Autocross Event at Monroe Community College. As my race team was either sick or traveling, alone I unloaded the '69 Buick Electra as the BMW crowd watched in awe. It was a sunny cool moring in Rochester, NY. I scanned the area a saw lots of cars. I suppose we were a good several feet longer and maybe more than a foot wider than most competitors. There were some raced out BIMMERS with taped out headlights and slicks. Some hot factory hot rod M-3s and some really fast VWs too. Some of the fastest cars were two pretty racy silver Honda convertibles driven by a father and son. Now that's a family activity. The son was pretty intense on the track, taking it to the limit and scoring one of the best runs, a 55!

I registered and while on line talked to some of the organizers. Tim Moriarity, Bill, and Mel were the seasoned drivers running the program. I had communicated with them previously and we worked out widening the course for the big Electra. Everyone got a big chuckle out of that!

Tech inspection drew a crowd as the inspectors poked and prodded the Electra, maming sure the wheel bearings were tight and the nuts were secure on the wheels. Tire pressure had to be up. (Uh-oh, the rears are still drag pressure!) Everything checkout fine otherwise and I got some air from Mel. Rears at 32 fronts at 40psi.

The 10:00am driver's meeting consisted of several mini-lectures about driving the course, safety, and operations of the business of Autocross. The starting gate was right over a puddle and the turns seemed awfully tight. We walked the course and checked out the esses, slaloms, turns and routes marked with the bright orange cones. We were told that "if you knock down a cone the penalty is 2 seconds off your time." There were some spray painted guidelines which were "just there for a guide, feel free to go outside of them." "Do not go outside of the cones." "Green flag means go." "Red flag means stop" "Safety first!"

The course requires about 60 seconds for a seasoned driver. My helmet was not up to the SNELL rating so I borrowed a loaner and fired up the STAGE 1 455. My first run was 89 or so seconds as I needed a good bit of direction navigating the unfamiliar course. Mel guided me through it and I blundered my way around, trying not to knock down any cones. It seemed to go way too quickly as I was trying to absorb instruction and drive at the same time. "Not this way that way!""Make a right at this branch!", "Turn your head this way and see what you have to do next!". It was all very intense and fun!!! The old Buick never went so fast around so many turns!

So, like I said the the range of time were from 55 to 89. most people were 65 -69 seconds. There were maybe 15 cars, "a light turnout" they said. The forecast called for rain all day so I was not surprised. The weather got a bit cloudy toward the end but never wet. Temp was about 80 most of the day.

Yesterday, I had spent all my time alternating between necessary home projects, including fixing a toilet and plastering a cieling and working on the car. In the end I only got the new 3.33 TRACTION-LOCK unit on. It was very heavy but I managed to put it in with the help of my hydraulic floor jack by myself. I had NO time to put the roadrace springs on. Rain Pirelli 335/35/17 tires went on the back and the road race R Compound 255 ZR 17 Pirelli CORSA tires went on the front. I thought, "She would have good grip with soft springs if it rained, although there might be a lot of body roll on dry pavement. I packaged up the 4.11 nodular FORD 9" centersection and put it under my workbench.

OK OK OK...now this is when the fun started...! It must have been about 11:00am when "One Lap of America" Champion Roy Hopkins rolls up in his Neon. The skies parted and the sun shone through onto our track! Roy was working on his racecar prepping it for a competition in Newfoundland and was too busy to compete in today's event. He did me a solid in coming out to take the Faithful Pursuit for a lap. We get our helmets on, buckled our harnesses, and waited for the green flag.

When the green dropped, we roar off down the winding leg and do a first right 90 degree hard right into the 7 cone slalom, probably a good 1/8 mile long, we are pulling some good G's as Roy skillfully leads the huge Buick past the cones alternating from side to side through them. At the end, there is a "Y" where we take a sharp 180 degree turn onto the left branch which leads back through a winding esse and turn even more sharply into the beginning of the same slaom course we first negotiated. I am hanging on for dear life as the car feels like a bucking bull! I'm taking video but the ride was so intense I had to keep some focus on what was going on and at some points forgot I was holding a camera. We go through the slalom again, it is wicked fast as we run almost up to redline of 6000 in 1st gear. At its end we now take the right branch of the "Y" and now take a sweeping right into a mini three cone slalom. There was a tight right, a short straight, a 160 degree right turn and a blast out the back end hitting the 6000 rpm rev limiter as we shot out through the timing lights. 65 seconds in the hands of the master!

I told Roy that that run was "Amazing" Roy noted that the brakes felt good and the power was great. The springs needed to be 3x harder. I apologized for not having the road race springs on.

We drove off the course to the lot, parked, she idled for 20 seconds and then cut herself off...out of gas! (The low level of fuel caused starvation and I had to blow into the vent by mouth to prime the Holley Blue electric fuel pump!)There was a rear axle tube leak and a little slick forming under the right rear tire. That knocked us out for the rest of the day!

A State Trooper came by with the Trooper z-28 over lunch. The group was happy to see him as he is a member and regularly participates in his off time. The black '99 Z had yellow stripes. The speedo is calibrated to 155, and she has seen every bit of it! He was a member of the BMW club and crews for Roy, lots of people there crewed for Roy!

I asked the Trooper if he would mind taking photos with the Buick. Several people, including the Trooper came by and took photos with the big Electra. One guy commented he felt the Earth move when we took the course. They probably registered something on somebody's richtor scale! We got some good photos and some pretty amazing video.

What is good about the video is that it is crummy! You see...the ride was so intense that the video picture was bad and the sound was too loud so it distorted. All of this gives you the sense of the intensity. I had NO IDEA the Faithful Pursuit could pull those kinds of Gs!!! I was in a stunt plane once, a PITTS S2B biplane. We did over 6Gs and performed many rolls, hammerhead, wing over, power dives, and lots of other stuff. This felt a little like that!!!

Harder springs would have lessened the "violence" of the movements some, but the G forces may have intensified if she would still stick!

With road race springs and shock back in and tires up to 51 psi, I wonder what time she would to next! At 65 we were one of the better times, probably just below the average some.

Toward the end, I was happy to volunteer as a red flag and fire extingusher man right next to the final turn and near the second set of slalom cones. We were all done by about 3:00pm! A short 2 hour ride home and I was back at work with the rest of the home chores!

God Speed, <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

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WOW! <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> And you didn't even have your road race suspension setup!!! You are very hot on your performance goals, I would have loved to see peoples reaction to the "Big Buick" <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" /> navigating around the coarse so succesfully especially considering that Electras never originally had a reputation for slolom road coarse handling! That is truly amazing!

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