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1940 Buick front inner bearing help


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My left front inner wheel bearing race "cone" that goes to the back of the spindle does not fit tight, its able to spin. Shouldn't it be pressed on? I would think it should be stationary. I know it is a separate part unlike later spindles that inner cone is actually part of the spindle.

I tried a new old stock cone wondering if it would fit tight but that one is loose also. The one on the right side of the car is tight.

Is this a problem? Do I need a new spindle? Whats the fix ?

Please let me know your thoughts.

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The shop manual indicates that the inner race should be free to revolve.  "The bearing inner races were designed to creep on (the) knuckles in order to afford a constantly changing load contact."  The drum oil seal rides on the inner race.  I've noticed that the old oil seals were a felt material with a significantly greater surface area riding on the inner race the the new reproduction seals offer.  The shop manual further states that a film of grease should be used on the knuckle to prevent rust accumulation.

 

On that note, I would not affix the inner bearing race to the knuckle.

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If you need or want U.S.A. made Bearings -- as opposed to the Chineseum world, I have N.O.S. U.S.A. made.Bearings.....

 

Always best to simply call me --- Craig --- 516 - 485 - 1935.... New York....

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Old-timers, and specifically my late friend Willie Guillot, a First Class machinist, used to tell me that it should be free to "WALK", and not be locked into a fixed position

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1 hour ago, mobileparts said:

If you need or want U.S.A. made Bearings -- as opposed to the Chineseum world, I have N.O.S. U.S.A. made.Bearings.....

 

Always best to simply call me --- Craig --- 516 - 485 - 1935.... New York....

Thank you, I have N O S bearings. The new inner race still rotates.

 

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Posted (edited)

Inspect the spindle for wear and gauling.  If you have a micrometer, measure the OD of the inner spindle bearing area.  They should basically match side to side.  That spindle does not look like it has ever had a spun or seized bearing on it.  It still looks smooth across the area where the bearing race sits.     

The bearing race is hardened steel relative to the spindle shaft.  The wheel is more likely to rotate on the ball bearings than it is on the spindle.  If you have good bearings and they are greased well and adjusted properly, I would not worry about it.     Hugh

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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19 hours ago, kgreen said:

The shop manual indicates that the inner race should be free to revolve.  "The bearing inner races were designed to creep on (the) knuckles in order to afford a constantly changing load contact." 

My Pontiac manual also states the same.  The inner race creeping has not seemed to cause any problems in 500,000 miles.  I know my Grandfather repacked the bearings every spring (approx 3,000 miles) and I have repacked them twice a year (approx 5- 6,000 miles) for the last 59 years.  As an aside my Pontiac was the first car off the assembly line in Regina on Friday,  June 6 ninety years ago.

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If I'm not mistaken they have to creep. The distance the balls have to roll on each race may not quite match. If it couldn't creep you would would be dragging the balls across the race. The creep is slow, and so does not heat up as along as everything is clean and greased.

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I tallied up the votes and the creeps win !   I put it back together and down the road I went.  Thanks for all the information.            mic drop

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