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Any tips or tools to use on getting the tube and tire back on the split rim to lock in place? Clearly I’m not strong enough to do this with a tire iron.

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You can get them mounted up albeit only loosely, but you probably need a rim spreader to get them onto the car.  

 

If you just bought car, look under seats for a toolbox that spreader could be in or possibly inquire with prior owner. 

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what make & year is the vehicle.

I assume you are working with wood spoked wheel.

What is the Diameter  of the rim when the tire is installed installed.

A rim spreader (3 point) fits inside the split rim.

make rim smaller by turning the crank so the rim ends overlap.  

put the rim strip, inner tube, & tire on rim.  Reverse crank direction to enlarge rim.

they cost 40 to 60 dollars.
 

 

DD244979-3C47-41AA-A2C1-FF926682203F.jpeg

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Thats certainly the tool im lookjng for. Its on my 1919 Olds truck. Im not sure how these were suppedly done roadside. Real ball breaker.

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Bill Harper posted the following rim splitter instructions on another forum. Very helpful to me. 

 

If you have 35" tires the rim o.d. should be 25"?  If so I do have a three jaw rim splitter for $65.00 plus shipping. 

 

Best 

Charley

Rim Tool 7230.jpg

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You can do all the early rims by hand, with just simple hand tools. It was back in the day when men were men, and the assumption was you would be bleeding by the time the job was done. I still do ALL my snap rings with just four hand tools...........I use to be able to do six wheels in three hours. Now I only do two in a day. I could do them faster, but it feels like I had my butt kicked if I do more than two in a day. Ravages of getting old.

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3 minutes ago, leon bee said:

Also, I'd think you'd need some good gloves, a box of Bandaids, and some Wild Turkey. Maybe some Valium.


Close......but no cigar...........no, literally, you forgot the cigar and you need Canadian Whisky, not Burbon.

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Make sure you have your last will and testament ready when you work on these split trims. Theres a reason they call them "widowmakers". Tire stores dont even want to touch those split rims. 

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The picture shows a split rim design that is way different than the truck split rims that are widowmakers. The truck split rim is a small sliver of rim that holds one bead in place.

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Yes I wasnt sure what the widowmaker was but an old timer in town said this isnt that type. I will measure the inner rim in the morning. If it is for your size tool Charley I'll take it.  

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1 hour ago, Frank DuVal said:

The picture shows a split rim design that is way different than the truck split rims that are widowmakers. The truck split rim is a small sliver of rim that holds one bead in place.

 

And even THAT isn't the infamous widowmaker of times past. The widowmakers were wheels that split in the CENTER. The two halves of the wheel twist and lock. Nobody will work on those. A little rust in the wrong place, or the halves not quite locked, and they can come apart.  They WILL take off your head if you happen to be in the way. It could happen at any time.

 

The ones Frank DuVal and edinmass described are different. They have locking rings. They can also kill you if the locking ring is not seated properly when you inflate it, but are pretty benign once assembeld and inflated. Any tire shop that deals with big trucks can mount tires on them. They will insist on inflating them inside a cage, and they will have one because this rim type is still used. An old fashioned way is to tie it up in logging chain, then stand back when you inflate it.

 

The rims in the original post are neither. They wont kill you, they will just make you swear a lot.

 

 

 

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Split rims

Split rims

Split rims

!!!!!!!!!!!!!

First off. Be clear about the type of "split rims" you are working with. Okay, I and most people here figured out (we THINK?) ????

There are two completely totally and wholly DIFFERENT types of rims usually referred to simply as "split rims". 

One type, the ones that use the "split rim jack" or "split rim spreader" has a (usually) single cut across the rim, with the rim having the rolled up edge  all the way around the rim for the tire bead to set and press against after the rim is expanded and (hopefully) latched (hopefully, they still have the latch?). Note, these are NOT the "widow makers".

 

The other type are any one of a dozen common and many more not-so-common variations of multi-part NON COLLAPSIBLE rims with some one or combination of rings or rim pieces that may or may not lock, snap in place, or even intertwine in some way to hold one (or sometimes even both) side of the tire in place. These, due to an ability to under certain circumstances slip apart under pressure are the ones known as "widow makers". IF (my favorite big "IF" again) they are handled correctly, used with care and all due caution, they are relatively safe, and should not be feared.

 

How they are to be handled, and worked with, are very different. Both types have many "tricks of the trade" or little secrets that make the job easier.

 

Boy, I get interrupted mid-typing and several people chime in. I am glad that they do, but think I will stop and post as is for now. Maybe more later.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Split rim or snap ring, both leave you bleeding. The split rim jack tool is good but it’s very easy to damage the rim if you don’t have experience. We usually manage them without the screw jack. When you get to the larger split rims like a Pierce Arrow from 1929-1930 they are very difficult to deal with without the rim jack. The snap ring rims are the ones that want to kill you. Like others said, the more you do them, the more tricks you learn to pop tires on and off. Almost no tire center I have ever been to will do the snap rings.......truck shop or not. Taking your time is 80 percent of the challenge......too many people rush it and bend or damage the rims and rings. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Cadillac's of the time used a pliar with two studs on it for the kelsey rims - I've changed tyres both with it and without it, with the correct tool you can change a tyre in about 5 minutes 

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35 inch is rather hard to find a spreader that works as most are for Model T Fords and don't open that far. My 1915 Buick has 26 inch rims and the rim size on early cars can go as large as 27. So when looking at spreaders be sure you get one that opens far enough. The thing that works the best is one of these.  It is a Weaver tire machine from the early years of autos. It is the only thing I found that makes the job easy. Dandy Dave!  

IMG_2321 (1).JPG

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Dandy Dave 

 

The poster mentions 35" wheel rather than the 35" tire that he has. Looking at the markings on his tire 35 x 5. It would indicate a 25" rim size. 

 

Your Weaver tire machine is way cool.

 

Best

Charley

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3 minutes ago, deaddds said:

Yes its 25" across. If that tool will do the job I'll take it. How do want to procede?

I will send you a pm with some photos. Be back home in a few hours.

 

Thanks

Charley

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Edin, the tool looks pretty self evident but is there a specific technique I should employ? I dont have a spare rim so I dont want to dick it up. It looks like I hook one of the three a little in from the beveled end with the clasp. Plan is to slowly crank on the tool until it just slides into the rubber bead area and then slowly release it to align and turn the lock.

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25 minutes ago, deaddds said:

Edin, the tool looks pretty self evident but is there a specific technique I should employ? I dont have a spare rim so I dont want to dick it up. It looks like I hook one of the three a little in from the beveled end with the clasp. Plan is to slowly crank on the tool until it just slides into the rubber bead area and then slowly release it to align and turn the lock.

Pay close attention to the instructions as to where the tool is mounted on the rim. Otherwise, you could bend it.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Split rims

Split rims

Split rims

!!!!!!!!!!!!!

First off. Be clear about the type of "split rims" you are working with. Okay, I and most people here figured out (we THINK?) ????

There are two completely totally and wholly DIFFERENT types of rims usually referred to simply as "split rims". 

One type, the ones that use the "split rim jack" or "split rim spreader" has a (usually) single cut across the rim, with the rim having the rolled up edge  all the way around the rim for the tire bead to set and press against after the rim is expanded and (hopefully) latched (hopefully, they still have the latch?). Note, these are NOT the "widow makers".

 

The other type are any one of a dozen common and many more not-so-common variations of multi-part NON COLLAPSIBLE rims with some one or combination of rings or rim pieces that may or may not lock, snap in place, or even intertwine in some way to hold one (or sometimes even both) side of the tire in place. These, due to an ability to under certain circumstances slip apart under pressure are the ones known as "widow makers". IF (my favorite big "IF" again) they are handled correctly, used with care and all due caution, they are relatively safe, and should not be feared.

 

How they are to be handled, and worked with, are very different. Both types have many "tricks of the trade" or little secrets that make the job easier.

Thank you Wayne.  Maybe your description will help people understand.  People here and on other sites have got upset with me when I mention "nomenclature" or try to tell them the difference between a "split rim",  "two piece rim including lock ring", "two piece rim without lock ring" and "three piece rims with lock ring" and then of course there are the split rims with a triangular solid ring that fits behind the wedges to center the rim on the felloe.

Part of the problem today is the common incorrect usage of the terms even among manufacturers.

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
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deaddds

 

Sorry, I just measured the rim tool. It opens to 25" max. Your rim is probably 26" or 26-1/2"  outside diameter. You'll need a little larger unit. This one is a Pacific Rim Tool B1.

IMG_20200530_132036.jpg

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Are you sure? The tire in your picture earlier in this thread was a 35x5 if I read it right. That's a 25 inch rim, right?

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24 minutes ago, Bloo said:

Are you sure? The tire in your picture earlier in this thread was a 35x5 if I read it right. That's a 25 inch rim, right?

Bloo

 

It's 25" where the bead sits on the rim. The sides of the rim are larger diameter to hold the tire on the rim. Hopefully I explained it correctly.

 

Charley

 

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, just me said:

Bloo

 

It's 25" where the bead sits on the rim. The sides of the rim are larger diameter to hold the tire on the rim. Hopefully I explained it correctly.

 

Charley

 

 

OH! I see.

 

I thought the tool hooked under the whole rim.... Doesn't it?

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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One thing about the video that I see wrong is the fact that i did not see a tube/rim liner/band installed after installing the tube and before installing the tire on the rim.

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Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

YouTube has videos of what to do....

 

Its good to have a video, but for god sake the fellow still is on one point clueless about what he is doing - you need a FLAP in this tire to protect the tube from the rim (aka this fellow did an unsafe installation on his Kissel).   Also, all that dwelling he does about pinshing the tube is a waste of time/effort - that is also what the flap is for, albeit still a barrel full of monkeys project.   I assume he just does not know or perhaps he thinks he is smarter than 100 years of engineers, but nevertheless .... 

 

Backtrack - he is clueless on a second point as well - he does not know how to fully use the functionality of his original tool rim spreader (aka you do not need a 4 ton jack either). 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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