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Memoribilia to view - A guide


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4 hours ago, trimacar said:

I went to the great Pierce Arrow meet this past week in Lancaster Pa.  Part of the meet was a silent auction of items donated by a long time member of the Pierce Arrow Society.

 

I was somewhat shocked to find a couple of toy cars in the auction, one of which was a 1910 Converse Pierce Arrow touring car.

 

I didn't pay much attention, thought it had be repainted at some time, didn't bid a lot but did keep my eye on it.  To my surprise I won it with a smallish bid, as it seemed very few people knew what it was.

 

I had another one that I thought was OK, but after close inspection the one I just bought is beautiful, and I'm starting to believe original paint.  In addition, it's the spring driven moving model, with working steering, which my other one is not.

 

I'm tickled to have both of them, thought I'd share.  Large model, about sixteen inches long.

IMG_5061.jpg

Quite an interesting history on those Morton Converse automobiles.  More info can be found here -

 

https://www.antiquetoys.com/morton-converse-toy-cars-wanted-circa-1912/?v=7516fd43adaa

 

Not sure why so many of his toy automobiles were Pierce but he made quite a variety of them - roadsters, tourers, trucks, etc.  Some even came with canvas folding tops and glass windshields.  Head and sidelamps were always nicely carved in wood and painted gold.  They were well made and survival is pretty good on them.  Here is a photo of a couple of them in a friend's collection.  The one on the right is a roadster with canvas top and glass windshield, which is unfortunately broken.

Terry

 

 

Converse toy cars.jpg

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Wow, that roadster is nice, very few seem to have the top.  And, on the touring, the top folds down.  The story of how Converse got started with toys is interesting.  Know anyone who could make repro wood lights?

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3 hours ago, trimacar said:

Wow, that roadster is nice, very few seem to have the top.  And, on the touring, the top folds down.  The story of how Converse got started with toys is interesting.  Know anyone who could make repro wood lights?

I'm sure that with a sharp pocket knife and some wood scraps you could do it while sitting in the easy chair counting days till Hershey.

Terry

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2 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

I'm sure that with a sharp pocket knife and some wood scraps you could do it while sitting in the easy chair counting days till Hershey.

Terry


Or using dowel and a drill press set up to be a mini wood lathe, so long as you have a good picture with a scale and maybe even a few diameter measurements it would be rather easy. If Terry would be so kind, I would be willing to give it a shot...

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I have a set of original “lights”  on the back one, I could make drawings...headlights would be one turning, the sidelights are three separate turnings joined together...

 

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While David was at the Pierce event I went back to the CC storage unit. Well preserved Ford Truck advertising Banner 38 by 52. The close up shows one blemish.  The material is synthetic. My question is can this be cleaned and how?  Is the material likely Rayon?  Thanks

F8837333-4591-45D1-B39F-EEB7ECE0FFD1.jpeg

Edited by Robert G. Smits
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13 hours ago, Robert G. Smits said:

99214E9A-D1F9-4DFF-9BD2-DF3ABB4980FD.jpeg

That looks like a spot where a price sticker was attached.   Bad stuff!   Wonder if some of that "glue-be-gone" stuff would help?  BUT - first rule - DO NO HARM.  

 

It's a nice banner, and just one blemish, which represents honest wear and aging to some extent, does not really detract.  Any attempt to clean or improve on that spot might result in damage to the material, discoloration, or worse.   I'd say leave it alone.  While we'd love to have everything be perfect, that's not likely with our old stuff.  It's the nicest one I've ever seen.  You should be happy with it.

Terry

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Thanks Terry.  Good advice.  We all like everything to be perfect.  After all these years my wife suggests I'm not perfect either.  This is part of my stash that was placed in CC storage when we moved to the panhandle of Florida in 2000.  Because of humidity and hurricanes I left a large amount in storage.  Little did I know that helping raise triplet grandsons in Texas for the past 12 years would consume so much of my life.  So now I am starting t go through my collection and I can probably keep several threads going for a while.  Some of the stuff I have no recollection where it came from although the Ford Truck banner came from the Indy Advertising Show prior to 2000. I am getting ready to have it matted and framed.  More to come.

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Having things displayed so you can enjoy them is important. We've all got too much tucked away. I have so many wall hangers and not enough walls! I think together we could keep this forum well supplied with things to look at for a long time. Because of the high cost of framing stuff I've been doing my own for several years. Some stuff I still prefer to use a professional for,  but cutting my own mats, glass, and making my own frames or using thrift store bargains has been fun. The money I save goes to Hershey for more stuff.

Terry

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I actually started a sheet-music thread a while back and posted some images of a few, include one of the Mercer piece in my collection.  It's a very striking image.  It's something I've collected a long time.  I've got around 300 different, all of them early, the majority pre WWI.  The largest collection I've ever heard of was 600 but I'm not convinced that's an accurate number, unless you count variations and more modern titles (which don't really excite me).   It's the fantastic cover illustrations that are what attracts me.  Wish I had the wall space to frame and hang them.  Only a few grace the wall in the staircase going upstairs. 

 

Despite the breadth of my collection, there are still a lot I don't have and may never acquire.  There were many songs written to promote specific automobiles (like the Mercer).  'm sure that some printed about very rare cars were available in such small quantities, and just local areas they are impossible to find now.

 

It's a cross-over collectable like many other items.  I have found people who collect rag-time music and related memorabilia are among my fiercest competitors.  Here are a few more.

Terry

 

 

Gasoline Rag 2.jpg

Belle of 1900.jpg

Benzine Buggy Man (Stodard Dayton).jpg

Fiat.jpg

Ford Sedan.jpg

I'll Ford down to Florida but I'll soon Cadillac back.jpg

Our New MoonCar.jpg

That Auto Ought to Go.jpg

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1 hour ago, Robert G. Smits said:

I thought I had seen that posted before but forgot about your sheet music thread.  It's hard to keep a thread going when you have most of the material.  

Wish I did have most of it - lots I've seen in other collections that I'll probably not ever find.  Nice thing about collecting things like that (like spark plugs), so much was produced only in localized communities that it's difficult to find outside of that area.  There is stuff published on the West coast that I'll never find.  That's why this forum has been so great.  It connects collectors. 

Terry

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I picked up one of these switches maybe 5 years ago and the other about 2 years later.

Both identical boxes contained identical NOS switches that look slightly different than the boxes.

What is odd the name on the box is Pollac Universal and both switches have Kanpp stamped on the front.

 

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001 (2).JPG

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Recent acquisition - another Royal Doulton item.  These vase are large - 9 5/8" tall.  They are among only a few pieces in the Doulton Motorist series that have two different images on them - one on each side.  Images on this one are not often seen on these vases.  There are 9 different images in this series, all hand colored, that are seen on a variety of different items.  Six of the known scenes are used on plates in different sizes.  They were produced from 1905 when the design was first registered, until 1928 when they were discontinued.  There are quite a few automobilia collectors chasing these wonderful items, and I've wanted a vase for many years.  They seem to suffer commonly from crazing in the glaze, and as you can imagine, damage to those large handles.  For that reason, I've passed on a few examples over the years.  Just as I began to wonder if I'd ever find one that was above average in condition, I had the chance to buy this one - and it is nearly perfect!   All good things in time I guess.

Terry

My collection 9 inch vase side 1.jpg

My collection 9 inch vase side 2.jpg

Edited by Terry Bond (see edit history)
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Added quite a bit this week. Finally got the maxwell milk glass up. Plastic lighted Simca sign which is very late 50's, early 60's. Canadian mopar sign beside it. Skeleton neon's added at the bottom. A TV show has asked to come in and do an episode on the place, so I'm scrambling to get things up that I've been putting off. Next week I go to take down a 10' x 22' billboard that has been in its original location since the 1940's. Pretty crazy. 

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Motometers made by the Boyce Company of Long Island City are well known, but Boyce also exported these and those could have text printed on them that would be in the language of the country they were exported to. Here are two examples of Boyce offerings found in the French car magazine Omnia. The car mascot type with the plated wing has a glass tube running up through the middle that can be seen if you look to the right side of the image, this is from 1932.  the print advertisement is from 1926.

New York was a major export venue for all kinds of products , from American car and truck chassis ( that were then bodied in Europe) to products like this. The Packard Motor Car Company earned a substantial profit from the export of its trucks when the Great War ( WWI) was raging in Europe . Trucks were transported from the Packard factory by barge across Lake Erie then loaded on trains to make the journey to New York City to be loaded on steam ships along the Hudson River. Vehicle production in Europe had diminished as factories were producing items for combat.

MotometerBPARIS1926.jpg

BoycemotometerTWOFrance1932.jpg

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Motometer collectors are about as crazy of some spark plug collectors I know of.😉

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Posted (edited)

In the past several weeks we've made trips to both Saratoga Springs, NY and most recently to Auburn, IN.  We flew to Albany, rented a car (arranged well in advance thank goodness) and drove to and from Saratoga Springs.  The AACA meets in both places were great and it sure felt great to be out and about once again.  Lots of fantastic cars to look at, old friends to share time with again, and even some antique hunting. 

 

The trip to and from Auburn was especially great as we drove and included some of our favorite antique stops along the way.  We've given them a full year to restock, but-dealers tell us they've been closed a year and with little business, there was no incentive to bring in new merchandise, and little opportunity to do that anyway. 

 

Near Cincinnati Ohio, there is a very large antique mall that's open 7 days a week, 9Am to 9Pm.  As always we manged to find a few treasures there, but nothing really significant.  There are other antique malls in the vicinity, but nothing as good. Most in fact were more like big yard-sales than true antique shops.  Sorry folks, but made yesterday toys and beanie babies are NOT antiques!l 

 

The ride home took us across towards Springfield, Oh where we spent several hours breezing through the Heart of Ohio Antique Mall.  Over 500 real antique dealers are housed in a large building filled with aisles of display cases, and individual booths selling great stuff.  What little "junque" did exist there was isolated to a few backroom areas.   Saw some neat things, and carried a few home with me.  Prices generally very good, although there were a few things I saw that were absolutely stupid.  Long gone are the days when antique dealers would buy something and put a percentage mark-up on it.  Their merchandise usually turned over quickly.  Now, we see dealers who look at Evil-bay, pick the highest asking guess on an item and try to get rich.   Off-target a bit here but had to rant a bit.

 

Here are a few of my recent additions to the automobilia collection.   It's quite a variety, but all are genuine early antique objects related to the history of motoring.  

 

First up, a neat early embossed fold-out German valentine.   Love these things!

 

1552168148_EarlyValentinenewacquisitionresized.jpg.2bead59783b51854780aa4377a707cd1.jpg

 

Next is a fabulous linen pillow cover that was never sewn into a pillow. I've seen these also used as just framed decorations or even used as draft screens for fireplaces.   The image is painted onto the linen and the colors are bold.  Any creasing shadows showing will naturally flatten out before I mat and frame it.  It's very early and a variety that I'd not seen before.  It measures 24" square.

Pillow cover type 2.jpg

 

Another nodder!  This fine porcelain nodder (bobble head is today's term for them) is in fantastic condition It's hand pained and lightly glazed.  They usually came in pairs-a man and woman motorist.  I have another pair I'd shown previously and although this one is similar, it's different in several ways.  Search is on for her mate!

Nodder 1.jpg

 

The next little print may have served as an advertising piece or label at one time  Its only about 5" square.

Boy-Girl driving.jpg

 

Can't find a date on this Ford Times magazine.  I'm guessing 1911, and it shows a UK manufactured Model T touring car.  The UK manufactured Ts are often seen with the rounded cowl rather than the flat wooden dashboard typical of T's made in this country.  Another indication is the wooden windshield framework and the enclosed touring car body.   No indications of a date for it, but I'm sure if I look through the info I've got at hand I'll come up with something.

Ford times.jpg

 

Below is a fairly common print by noted illustrated Earl Christy.  I couldn't resist this one as it's in a nice period frame.  Although I have a larger version of this, I'm going to hang this one in my office and enjoy it while I'm plunking away on the keyboard posting neat stuff on the forum.

Print Christie 2.jpg

 

Last up is a cool gold-wash stickpin from an early automobile dealership in Los Angeles.   This is a fairly large stickpin, larger than most others in my collection.  Shown also is the backside.  The Reuss automobile Company gets several mentions in an internet search.  Apparently it was an well establish and quite early dealership selling a number of different high-end automobiles.  It seems that Wm Reuss also was involved in early automobile racing.  More research needed, but I like it.

 

Stickpin front.jpg

Stickpin back.jpg

 

There were other items too that I've not photo'd yet and will save for another time.  Got some neat early periodicals, an early 1910 accessory catalog, and a few other small items for the display case.  

 

Good stuff is still out there, but you have to dig through a lot to get there.   My feet were tired long before the wallet was empty!  

 

On to the next adventure!


Terry

Edited by Terry Bond (see edit history)
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Here’s a meager item to add to the mix.  I wonder if Terry Bond has a separate collection of these advertising items😀.  From the local Ford dealership here in Lititz PA.  Looking at the business end of this device I don’t think it was ever used for its intended purpose.

 

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3D73CD61-B5F8-4D25-82A3-D7BB422CDFD5.jpeg

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Guys, you’ll all be happy to know that the days of us wrenching and servicing our cars while worrying about costs are OVER. I just picked up this copyright 1917 (second edition from 1920) of :

 

“How To Take Care of an Automobile At Small Expense”

 

Even though it is my book, I’m happy to share some excerpts from it so we can all do what we love at “at small expense”

 

..........,”With a car you can go everywhere and see everything, and this takes you out of the rut of an ordinary human being and put you in the class of the superman”.......

089560A7-7882-4785-BFF4-613C90044595.jpeg

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On 3/31/2021 at 10:12 PM, Terry Bond said:

I'm going to add a couple of items here rather than try and start a separate thread - these are pretty neat but scarce items - Tobacco jars/humidors. There are some varieties that are figural - depicting an image of a chauffeur, or early motorist.   One of my favorites is this chauffeur in the lower left corner.  It was produced by the German manufacturers WS&S - Wilhelm Schiller and Sons.  The company began in the 1800s but did not survive after WWI.  They were well known for producing majolica porcelains. The bright, bold colors are indicative of that style of pottery.  The cap of the chauffeur removes to access the tobacco stored inside.  A compartment made as part of the underside of the cap has a space to hold a damp sponge to keep the tobacco moist.

The three "cartoonish" humidors are designed by the Italian caricature artist Peko.  The designs for these particular humidors were taken from illustrations done in both postcard and lithographic form.  These three different humidors all have removable caps, again with a place for a damp sponge.  In the back, lower level is a full-figured, rotund chauffeur by an unknown artist.  It is quite early, probably European and painted in the majolica style.  

 

There are many other motoring related tobacco jars, some full figured motorists, and others simple containers with an automotive scene illustrated on them.  I'm always looking for others, as are of course those who collect smoking related artifacts.

 

Enjoy,

Terry

Collection of humidors.jpg

Full figured humidor.jpg

I first posted this back at the end of March.  Since then, I've been able to add a couple of others including a very rare larger size of the Schiller produced humidor, and a different Peko (shown top left rear in the photo).  I didn't mention it earlier, but that squat round humidor is also pictured in the John Zolomiji book "The Motor Car in Art" depicting selections from the famed Ray Holland collection.  It's misidentified in that reference however and described as a "bowl with a hole in the lid for an attachment," which is missing from the one photo'd in the book.  Under the lid is a molded compartment for a damp sponge to keep tobacco moist, solid evidence of it's actual intended use.  I guess it also shows that not all reference works are totally accurate. 

Terry

Pair Whilhelm Schiller.jpg

Peko Humidors.jpg

Llidded jar type Humidor.jpg

Edited by Terry Bond (see edit history)
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Thought it about time I added something here again. Need to take a brief break from doing the research and writing rough drafts of several stories that are due for a deadline . This is a trivet(?) that Packard issued in the late teens? cast bronze. Reproductions were made some years ago so if you look at one for sale be aware of that. Got this from Austin Clark as he had more then one and that was in the early to mid 1970s. Neat that the back states who it was made for/by.

Yes, I will clean it but got it into my head to clean and polish some brass lamps evenings while being bored watching mindless tv so have to finish one of those up first. I do not really collect brass lamps ( my son says "yeah sure Dad") but have acquired a few over the years.

More photos of pre WWII era toys to follow - I love toys, the larger kind as it is easier to see details better.

Packardtrivetfront.jpg

PackardtrivetRear.jpg

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On 6/13/2021 at 12:48 PM, Terry Bond said:

Quite an interesting history on those Morton Converse automobiles

Terry, I picked up one more touring.  It's restored, which in the topsy turvy world of antique toys actually devalues it, but it's in nice condition with very nice lights.

 

Would like to find a roadster, let me know if you run across one you don't want!  dc

converse 3.jpg

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6 hours ago, Walt G said:

Thought it about time I added something here again. Need to take a brief break from doing the research and writing rough drafts of several stories that are due for a deadline . This is a trivet(?) that Packard issued in the late teens? cast bronze. Reproductions were made some years ago so if you look at one for sale be aware of that. Got this from Austin Clark as he had more then one and that was in the early to mid 1970s. Neat that the back states who it was made for/by.

Yes, I will clean it but got it into my head to clean and polish some brass lamps evenings while being bored watching mindless tv so have to finish one of those up first. I do not really collect brass lamps ( my son says "yeah sure Dad") but have acquired a few over the years.

More photos of pre WWII era toys to follow - I love toys, the larger kind as it is easier to see details better.

Packardtrivetfront.jpg

PackardtrivetRear.jpg

I don’t think it’s meant to be a trivet, but the earlier Whitehead & Haog paperweights seem to have similar feet, where the later Robbins Company ones do not. Great piece, and I will also note that the original W&H ones are likely marked on the edge and typically at the bottom of the design.

17FC6B88-6DF9-450F-B10F-78190C205656.jpeg

66B541CB-CDE0-4F0C-B9E6-45D0D4C462F7.jpeg

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3 hours ago, trimacar said:

Terry, I picked up one more touring.  It's restored, which in the topsy turvy world of antique toys actually devalues it, but it's in nice condition with very nice lights.

 

Would like to find a roadster, let me know if you run across one you don't want!  dc

converse 3.jpg

Nice. I looked at one not long ago that I considered over priced based on its coition ($1100).  I think there is a point where things like these are deserving of restoration if condition warrants. Did you notice the sidelamps are mounted upside down and backwards?

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9 minutes ago, Terry Bond said:

Nice. I looked at one not long ago that I considered over priced based on its coition ($1100).  I think there is a point where things like these are deserving of restoration if condition warrants. Did you notice the sidelamps are mounted upside down and backwards?

Yes, I'd noticed that, but just haven't had the time to fix. I'm thinking the lights must be reproductions, but on the other hand (per my diagram of them) they are not simple to replicate.

 

 Obviously restored by a toy guy and not a brass car guy, who would know which way they go, good catch on your part!

 

Yes, 1100 should buy you a pretty nice one.  thanks David C.

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5 hours ago, TheMoneyPit said:

I don’t think it’s meant to be a trivet, but the earlier Whitehead & Haog paperweights seem to have similar feet, where the later Robbins Company ones do not. Great piece, and I will also note that the original W&H ones are likely marked on the edge and typically at the bottom of the design.

17FC6B88-6DF9-450F-B10F-78190C205656.jpeg

66B541CB-CDE0-4F0C-B9E6-45D0D4C462F7.jpeg

The paperweights are great!   Here are a couple of others from my collection.  

Terry

Dort paperweight.jpg

Paige paperweight.jpg

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