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Memoribilia to view - A guide


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20 hours ago, Walt G said:

The black wood surface the styling model is sitting on is the roof of the 1923-24 Franklin body styling model


I would love to see pictures of this someday... it sounds like a great piece!

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Here is a accessory propeller that would attach to a bracket near the radiator cap or lower near the cross bar between the headlamps/license plate mounting. the whole thing would spin as the car went down the road, that includes the radial engine piece that was immediately behind the prop.

Also a license plate topper of a "cop" that would attach to the top of the rear license plate that was on the long stem taillight bracket. The figure would lean forward then back as the car would brake and the signs would flap as would the figure.

propellormascot.jpg

coptopper.jpg

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Posted (edited)

One more for today. Some "memoribilia" is larger then others so far as collections go. If you collect radiator shells ( some with radiators still solidly brazed in place) it can be daunting to move and store or display. I don't have many of these ( only 4 total dating from 1908 to 1936) and here is the one I have for  a 1936 DeSoto. Purchased in only "ok" condition I restored it to presentable display condition about 15 years ago. Now sits in my library/study taking up room . A great visual art moderne piece . I marvel at how that grille was cast as one piece, finished off and then mounted in a car.

DeSotogrilleshell1936.jpg

Edited by Walt G
date correction (see edit history)
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Wow, that's some cool stuff. I keep looking through this section and continental to thoroughly enjoy looking at the great items. So many things to collect...

As mentioned before I've written a monthly column for our AACA Region newsletter "The Mudflap" snce 2013 using a different topic each time, all about collecting automobilia. Well never run out of topics based on what I've seen here.

Thanks Walt (and all the contributors) for keeping us inspired.

Terry

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Terry, my friend you are welcome. I always feel it is good to share things - makes us more aware of what existed so if we are inspired to own something similar we know "what is real" . It is also reassuring to know that there are so many "fellow squirrels" out there that have the same attitude and appreciation of all of this "stuff" . It also gives us an excuse to continue the hunt for these treasures , large and small, we can look at our relatives, neighbors, etc. and fairly state " See they like and collect it too - so I am not so crazy as you think"  . 😏

Walt

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In our email discussion, we talked about early automobile accessory catalogs as being a great source for information.  I have collected them for many years, starting at Hershey in the old Red field when I came across a vendor selling several for $5 each.  He had a good stack of them and I sorted through and bought all the pre WWI catalogs he had - 7 of them.  At the time I bought them strictly to help ID and date some of the interesting spark plugs in my collection.  Later, when I became editor of the local AACA region newsletter I used some of the great illustrations as clip art to fill empty space.  The copy machine earned it's keep.

As my collection(s) of automobilia continued to expand, I used those catalogs as reference to help ID and date everything from unusual tools and garage equipment, to brass lamps, odd accessory items, and of course more spark plugs. My collection now exceeds 150 various catalogs from a wide variety of companies nation-wide.  I even have a few early British catalogs from the 1905-10 era.  They are fascinating.  Here are a few examples including some recent acquisitions.

Terry

 

1910 Charles Miller.jpg

American Auto supply NY 1914.jpg

Auto Economy Company 1909.jpg

BiMotor catalog 1910.jpg

Charles Miller early catalog.jpg

Everyting 2, 1915.jpg

Leavit and Bill 1905.jpg

T Forum 1912.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Morgan and Wright was founded in 1891 in Chicago during the bicycle boom. By the end of the 19th century they were the largest supplier of pneumatic bicycle tires and bicycle related accessories in the world. 

In 1894 they patented the “Quick Repair Bicycle Tire” which allowed for “on the road repairs “. With the rotation to automobiles in the early 20 rh century they turned to the automobile market moving to Detroit in 1905. They were purchased by USRubber in 1911 and eventually became Uniroyal.

This lithograph was sold to me by East Coast Picker friend who was a business associate of Ray Klug author of Antique Advertising Encyclopedia. I was told it was rare but thought it was a sales pitch. It has been hanging in various locations for 20 years and never out of sight. After Walt started this subject I decided to research the lithograph. I have not been able to find it on the internet or in any publications. If any of you have seen this before let me know and thank you Walt!!!

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Edited by Robert G. Smits (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

came across a vendor selling several for $5 each.

I was thrilled to get out and go to the Pate Swap Meet a few weeks ago.  A "junk" vender had a small stack of old magazines bound with twine for $5 that I couldn't pass up.  The top magazine was a 1905 Christian Herald with an interesting electric NYC sightseeing bus.  As I was going through the stack a few days ago I found this Tucker AD folded up inside one of the magazines.  Certainly worth the $5.

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3 hours ago, Robert G. Smits said:

Morgan and Wright was founded in 1891 in Chicago during the bicycle boom. By the end of the 19th century they were the largest supplier of pneumatic bicycle tires and bicycle related accessories in the world. 

In 1894 they patented the “Quick Repair Bicycle Tire” which allowed for “on the road repairs “. With the rotation to automobiles in the early 20 rh century they turned to the automobile market moving to Detroit in 1905. They were purchased by USRubber in 1911 and eventually became Uniroyal.

This lithograph was sold to me by East Coast Picker friend who was a business associate of Ray Klug author of Antique Advertising Encyclopedia. I was told it was rare but thought it was a sales pitch. It has been hanging in various locations for 20 years and never out of sight. After Walt started this subject I decided to research the lithograph. I have not been able to find it on the internet or in any publications. If any of you have seen this before let me know and thank you Walt!!!

5BDFFBB7-5754-403E-A95E-F6146F9CD7DA.jpeg

128C2A1C-57D2-48E6-8FE5-A81010AFB4A0.jpeg

That's one of my favorite prints. I have one hanging in a prominent place.  Although I don't know the arist, it is commonly believed the boy used as the subject was the son of the company president.  They do turn up occasionally but are hard to find in pristine condition.  I found mine at an advertising show many years ago.

Terry

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Terry, thanks for the additional information on the Morgan and Wright.  I was sure that someone on this forum would have come across this before.  Mike Eckles (Showtime Auctions) stopped by the other day and said he had sold a similar print in poor condition 10-12 years ago but knew nothing about the history.

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A new addition to my collection of small pins, buttons, etc - this is a souvenir pin from Dieppe France.  It's silver with some gold highlights and is quite early.  

What is recognized as the world's first automobile race was held in 1894 and was run from Paris to Dieppe.  That was the beginning of the famed city-to-city races held in France at the turn of the century.  I did a seminar on these early events at the AACA Annual Convention a couple of years ago.  Dieppe became a well know place for early motoring events, and when the Automobile Club of France took over the Gordon Bennett Cup race series in 1906, it became a popular stop along the courses.
While this pin (as far as I know) does not commemorate a specific event, or represent a particular car, it does represent how important Dieppe was to the history of the automobile - racing in particular.

A nice addition to my collection that arrived safely today from France.

Terry

Dieppe silver souvenir pin.jpg

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Sorry I didn't get to finish.  My 12y/o triplet grandsons came home from school.  Jackie Cooper starred in "The Little Rascals" from 1929-1931.  He was also Perry White in four "Superman" movies along with his role in 1931's "The Champ": He was the first child star to be nominated for Best Actor Academy Award for his appearance in "Skippy" at age 9.  In addition to acting he had a respectable career as a director for several episodes of M*A*S*H and The White Shadow.  He died May 3. 2011 at age 88.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8SH

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Found this in an antique store in Hershey on our way home from the annual car show and flea market. It usually rides on the top of a license plate on the back of my 1940 Buick

PAairplanetopper.jpg

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Hanging this big guy was a lot of fun. It's 10' tall and double sided. Careful planning and everything worked out. Was pumped to get this one as they're usually the 6' version. This was still on the wall of the building 6 months ago, pretty crazy given the condition of it. One of only 2 I know in this size, although I'm sure there are more. 

7BDD8B21-C356-41D2-9A30-C1CF8D4A03CC.jpeg

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They made 2 versions of this sign. I have the other version, but it as a fully restored piece, so it's leaving the museum. This is an original skin I purchased, then had the can/neon done to replace the restored version I had. I threw the fargo piece under it simply because it fit. This one wasn't too bad, easier than the dodge. Left the neon off so you could see the skin quality, it's in amazing condition. 

2AA83036-092A-485E-970E-531E4A699D21.jpeg

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Allow me to contribute to this topic by sharing my 1925 American National Packard Six pedal car still in original condition. This car has an opening door, tilt steering, it's fully sprung and has a trunk complete with an Alemite tool kit and junior grease gun. In 1925 you could win this car in a word building contest offered by the manufacturer. I've included a catalog page along with a page from the contest flyer as well. 

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Tool Kit.jpg

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Wow, that pedal car is fantastic, and with the history and all the go-withs!!!   Never had the space to collect pedal cars but sure wish I had the chance to acquire some that I've passed up over the years.  Will never forget one like this that turned up in an antique shop in Edinburgh Scotland back in the early 1970s.  Could have bought it for a couple hundred bucks at the time.

Terry

 

1900s Pedal car 3.JPG

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The glass slide was probably used in movie theaters for an advertisement projected up on a screen when reels were changed . I have a few for Ford model T showing body styles in the 1920s. Sometimes called glass lantern slides.

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3 hours ago, Robert G. Smits said:

This is a 4 by 4 inch transparency  I have no memory of purchasing it or ever seeing it before. Probably came with a box of junk. Any idea how this was used or did someone just take a high quality photo of a nos advertisement?

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Sometimes called a "magic lantern slide" these were used in movie theaters during breaks/intermission to advertise local businesses.  They were projected onto the screen much like we used 35mm slides not that long ago.  I've had a variety of them over the years.  The ones I remember most though were a number of slides advertising a Ford dealership featuring Model Ts.  Those slides ended up with Sherm Weatherbee when he worked at Lang's Model T Parts.  I believe those slides are now proud possessions of his son, Mark, who is a regular here on the forum.  Amazing sometimes how stuff circles around. 

Terry

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2 hours ago, Robert G. Smits said:

Found in the same box as preceding items. NOS counter display item in original package. 

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Nice advertising item!  I remember a few years back a quantity of these was discovered by an antique dealer.  Over time they've been sold at some auctions and of course evil-bay.  I've even seen them occasionally at Hershey.   As you can see in the example shown, there is a space where it's cut-out so a bottle of the polish can be inserted for display.  The bottle Is a cobalt blue color, shaped to fit the cut-out.  The paper label on the bottle has the same image on it so when the bottle is inserted, nothing seems missing.   I don't have an image of one complete.  Maybe someone here can supply one?  

Terry

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23 minutes ago, Terry Bond said:
2 hours ago, Robert G. Smits said:

Nice advertising item!  I remember a few years back a quantity of these was discovered by an antique dealer.

That would explain the pristine condition of this advertising piece.  Terry your knowledge of advertising history along with Walt and others is amazing and  adds to the enjoyment of this thread along with educating the rest of us.

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That's what happens when you collect stuff a long time.  What I couldn't afford at the time is still firmly etched in my brain. 

Here are a few interesting items I've been wanting to post for a while - these are embossed die-cut automobile calendar tops.  Usually quite large, they had smaller tear-off calendar pads attached.  Although some of the automobile images were purely decorative, their most common actual use was for advertising.  I've been collecting these for a long time, and some even have the calendar pads still attached.

Terry

 

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Calendar Topper.jpg

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Posted (edited)

It is what these forums and AACA are all about, sharing what we have and the knowledge we have managed to gather. Seeing advertising items, actual pieces of cars, accessories, images - photographs and printed, every part of an item that is connected to a motor vehicle ( and some horse drawn) makes history come alive, just the way the real cars and trucks do when you see one , especially if it is going down the road under its own power. If it moves , some how it is alive, the way it was alive 25,45, 75 or 100+ years ago. Our collections of objects, information, etc. is what we ( AACA and other clubs) are all about. That respect for history keeps us alive too. There will always be something "old" that is "new:"" for us. That happened to me just 2 days ago when in a trade with a long time friend a package arrived with several souvenir programs for custom automobile salons that took place in the WWI era , Now to be added to my collection. It was amazing to see things I had not seen before and made my collection more complete  and also put the whole picture of what happen then in a more cohesive story. And yes that story will be shared with all of you eventually. All pieces of the puzzle.

WG

Edited by Walt G
removed redundant word (see edit history)
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I sure like small stuff - doesn't take up much room!  Among my loads of small things are these interesting and quite rare pieces of advertising.  They are postage stamp holders.  Made from delicate celluloid, they have an insert (made from celluloid) that holds a couple of postage stamps.  They are not much bigger than postage stamp size and were meant to carry in a wallet or vest pocket.  There are a lot of advertising stamp holders around and they are very collectable, but I find those that carry some form of automobile advertising on them are very hard to come by.  These are the only three I have.  Saw one a while back advertising a Model T era Ford dealership but it wasn't for sale unfortunately.  The one advertising Lucas gas lamps is fantastic and the celluloid insert with red, white, and blue ribbons is printed with a calendar showing mandatory "lighting up" times for the UK. Anybody seen (or have) others?

Terry

Stamp holders.jpg

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I went to the great Pierce Arrow meet this past week in Lancaster Pa.  Part of the meet was a silent auction of items donated by a long time member of the Pierce Arrow Society.

 

I was somewhat shocked to find a couple of toy cars in the auction, one of which was a 1910 Converse Pierce Arrow touring car.

 

I didn't pay much attention, thought it had be repainted at some time, didn't bid a lot but did keep my eye on it.  To my surprise I won it with a smallish bid, as it seemed very few people knew what it was.

 

I had another one that I thought was OK, but after close inspection the one I just bought is beautiful, and I'm starting to believe original paint.  In addition, it's the spring driven moving model, with working steering, which my other one is not.

 

I'm tickled to have both of them, thought I'd share.  Large model, about sixteen inches long.

IMG_5061.jpg

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