Buick35

classifieds pet peeve

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I hate spell checking but I also proof read and use the edit function if needed.I find a big turn off in advertising a car is spelling,I don't know why.People write breaks instead of brakes,ect. Dose this bother anybody else?Just wondering.Greg.

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, Buick35 said:

I hate spell checking but I also proof read and use the edit function if needed.I find a big turn off in advertising a car is spelling,I don't know why.People write breaks instead of brakes,ect. Dose this bother anybody else?Just wondering.Greg.

Yes, it does bother me.  But I paid attention in school.  How 'bout when people use ect. instead of etc. 😁  Double spaces after periods are also good to include...

Edited by KURTRUK (see edit history)
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So many advertised as 'rear' models.

 

Some seem to need to specify rear tail lamps to distinguish them from I don't know what other type. 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Buick35 said:

I hate spell checking but I also proof read and use the edit function if needed.I find a big turn off in advertising a car is spelling,I don't know why.People write breaks instead of brakes,ect. Dose this bother anybody else?Just wondering.Greg.

 

Dose??

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Is this discussion in relation to having a car for "sell?" It prolly is. (I've heard of lolly, folly & even by golly, but I have no clue what a prolly is.

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You probably have.

I used to use creative speeling as canary traps.

"blem wit" is when the speller picks the rong word.

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My list is long. Breaks is near the top. Axel is a man's name. Fellows instead of Felloe though felly is an alternate term but rarely used. Front windshield is another. The one in the rear is a backlight. Calling wheels "rims" drives me nuts. Does your car have a steering rim?

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What vehicle carries dead people?

 

What company made special shifters?

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Posted (edited)

One of my biggest pet peeves in automotive verbiage, regardless of language (or at least 3-4 I communicate with somewhat regularly), is not limited to advertising or marketing. It is a term called "Emergency brake" (???) or "E-brake" (???), both in spoken or written commentary.

 

In past +/-40 years I've driven probably 1000+ motor vehicles of all sorts and seen countless more, but can't really recall driving or seeing one with such devise or feature and therefor I assume (I know, I know...) anyone using such term can't or shouldn't be taken seriously as a real car guy/gal/person. 

 

Or perhaps it just me, since I never got past 8th grade and my last grade average was (allegedly) worse than anyone's ever in the history of the school district, but I hope it still stands as the "record". 

OTOH, since English is not my first (or even second) language and having never received an ounce of formal education for it, ... maybe that's it ?

Edited by TTR (see edit history)

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3 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

What vehicle carries dead people?

 

What company made special shifters?

 

 

So, a special shifter in a vehicle that carries dead people is a hearse Hurst?  ;)

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I love 4 wheel-drive trucks with a wench on the front, don't you?

 

And what does, "Needs restored" mean?  The needs the vehicle had have been restored?  Or it needs to be restored?

 

I know some of this stems from when classified ads charged for every word, so brevity was important.  But now that time has mostly passed, but you still see the same spare use of words.

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Ectually there was a time when wheels were mutipart and the "rim" was just one of them. Ever here of a "split rim" ? Lately this seems to have returned. And "Front Windshield" makes sense with a dual cowl phaeton.

 And the second was George's name. Another that has passed into lexicon is Crapper which is a proper name (Thomas) and not scatological.

However contrary to popular belief, "George" is not the name of every pulman porter.

 

Just because I like computer cars doesn't mean...

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Nice to see I'm not the lone grammar/spelling critic.

 

Agreed, "breaks" tops the list but let's not forget:

Manuel transmission

Duel exhaust

Convertable

For sell

Camero

Couger

Malibo

Bettle

Eldorado is one word when applied to Cadillac, not two.

There are no Coupe de Ville convertibles.

Hearse not Hurst.

A rusted out 6 cylinder Mustang is not "Eleanor"

If you have to add the words "muscle car" to the ad, it probably isn't.

I'm interested in pictures of the car for sale, not grand kids, dogs, cats or a fat chick sprawled on the hood.

 

Just sayin'

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Buick35 said:

I hate spell checking but I also proof read and use the edit function if needed.I find a big turn off in advertising a car is spelling,I don't know why.People write breaks instead of brakes,ect. Dose this bother anybody else?Just wondering.Greg.

 

 

Yes, it dose.  🤣

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Have always liked Maliblue but the common names for Jaguars and Cadillacs are not PC.

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9 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

...I'm interested in pictures of the car for sale, not grand kids, dogs, cats or a fat chick sprawled on the hood...

 

 

and a description of the car, not a complete history of the marque back to when it was horse-drawn.

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But the worst are those who never respond to a query (and do not have a phone number).

 

ps and never pursue a car that the owner refuses to share the VIN.

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I know it is a modern popular word to use for just about everything but it just annoys me to read something in a car wasn't restored, but "refurbished" .

So you will refurbish the inside of the cars ashtrays because they look a bit "used" or refurbish the motor with new pistons etc. Don't have the chrome replated have it refurbished. Huh? 🥺

Is the word 'restore'  out of date now, not in fashion, or just to old fashioned to use?

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Two different words. "Restored" is to make like new. "Refurbished" is to make it function as new. Cosmetics not included. Sometimes "refurbished" just means "detailed".

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Don't forget the "shinny" paint! 

 

I read a lot of things and wonder how people manage to make it though life. You can tell when someone hits the wrong letter as opposed to not understanding the basic workings of the English language. 

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Love all the replies.  I would like to add apostrophes.  They indicate that something belongs to something/someone as in John's.  OR they indicate that something is missing as in '42 which means 1942 or 1842 etc.  If written as 42' it means 42 feet long.

I also hate if interested call/contact etc.  

Keep safe aficionados.

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And, the always popular, Cummings Diesel

 

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4 minutes ago, Tinindian said:

Love all the replies.  I would like to add apostrophes.  They indicate that something belongs to something/someone as in John's.  OR they indicate that something is missing as in '42 which means 1942 or 1842 etc.  If written as 42' it means 42 feet long.

I also hate if interested call/contact etc.  

Keep safe aficionados.

Like Wily's. Ol' Willy owned a lot of cars. Try to make the argument that is pronounced "Willis" then you're in a loosing battle

 

 

 

 

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I grind my teeth when "cylinder(s)" is abbreviated "CLY" rather than "cyl."  Do you pronounce the full word "KLY-inder"?

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3 minutes ago, CarlLaFong said:

Try to make the argument that is pronounced "Willis" then you're in a loosing battle.

 

Carl, I think Willys won the battle:  The name is indeed pronounced "Willis," not "Willees."

Here's a Willys ad, and the name is pronounced twice just in the first 15 seconds.

But anyone who appreciates old cars never loses a battle:  You win every day you own one.

 

 

 

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