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I was on a day out with my mom when we saw this beautiful car sitting in front of a house. We tried to get ahold of the people who said they were selling but they didn't want to talk to us. I was wondering if you all could tell me the name? I'm interested in doing some research on it to maybe get one myself in the future! (I'm only 18 so I can already tell you I absolutely don't have the funds for it rn 😅) Any info helps! Thank you in advance!

 

Edit: I have no preference for doors or size. As long as the car looks like I'm a cool as ice time traveler strapped in leather I'll like it, so keep those recommendations coming 😍

 

P.S. I read the general rules of the forum but this is still my first time posting. I'm sorry if I break any rules!

 

20190913_173947.jpg

Edited by Jane Doe (see edit history)
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It's a 55 Chevy sedan delivery that has been cut in two and shortened. This was a thing some people did in the sixties, not sure why. 55 - 56 - 57 Chevies are among the most popular hot rods and collector cars and usually sell for more than other makes. They have the advantage of the best support when it comes to parts and repairs. They make an excellent collector car to start with if you can afford to buy a good  one.

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25 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It's a 55 Chevy sedan delivery that has been cut in two and shortened. This was a thing some people did in the sixties, not sure why. 55 - 56 - 57 Chevies are among the most popular hot rods and collector cars and usually sell for more than other makes. They have the advantage of the best support when it comes to parts and repairs. They make an excellent collector car to start with if you can afford to buy a good  one.

That's so incredibly helpful, thank you so much. I guess it's a good thing I fell for such a sturdy model 😂.

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It's more of a buyers market today than it was 20 years ago though. These cars will always have value, but the demand is lowering. IMO a solid 4 door sedan is the ticket for a budget '50s car. Their value is crippled but you get every bit as much car and frankly the styling isn't hurt nearly as much with the extra doors as during later periods.

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4 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It's a 55 Chevy sedan delivery that has been cut in two and shortened. This was a thing some people did in the sixties, not sure why.

 

Why is easy. Two doors are cool, more-doors are boring family cars.  😉

 

Note also that this car has been tubbed and the rear axle narrowed for those tires. I suspect a Pro Street project where someone got in over their head and now is bailing out. I'd be wary of half-fast workmanship.

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14 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Why is easy. Two doors are cool, more-doors are boring family cars.  😉

 

Note also that this car has been tubbed and the rear axle narrowed for those tires. I suspect a Pro Street project where someone got in over their head and now is bailing out. I'd be wary of half-fast workmanship.

You're right about them bailing for sure. While they didn't want to talk to my mother and I, there was another man there that was buying a red Corvette they had in the backyard. He told us that they were going broke and had to sell the cars so he was getting a good deal on it.

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Most of the cars I ever bought that were "good deals" ended up belonging to someone else fairly soon. The best cars I have owned are the ones the "experts" told me I paid too much for. The MOST you can ever expect is what you pay for.

 

Avoid situations where more people than the seller and you (mothers are OK) onsite. It causes agitation and distraction to your thinking.

 

Thoroughly study objective and subjective to the point where you can answer "What am I doing here?". It helps.

 

How much is the shortened car?

 

At 18, never forget, rich girls need love, too!

 

Bernie

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11 hours ago, Jane Doe said:

We tried to get a hold of the people who said they were selling but they didn't want to talk to us.

 

"Jane," welcome to the forum!  You'll find that

most car fans are more than happy to show their

cars to newcomers, and tell about them, too.

Since there are fewer teenagers than older people

interested these days, being naturally kind and supportive

is welcomed.  This is a great hobby, and it is much more

affordable than many outsiders realize.

 

We're happy to call you Jane, but you can

give at least your real first name if you wish.  This is

a safe and friendly forum, well moderated, supported

by the nation's most well-known antique-car club.

 

And you're welcome to post any time.  You aren't breaking rules;

you're adding to the interesting topics.

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11 hours ago, Jane Doe said:

... we saw this beautiful car sitting in front of a house. ...

 

In the mid-1950's, two-toned paint became popular.

Most cars had about 15 colors to choose from, and when

you mixed and matched colors to your taste, there were

often 80 to 100 possible combinations!  It was almost like

decorating your own home:  With so many choices, you

could suit your own individuality.

 

For example here are 3 different 1955 Buicks:

 

 

1955 Buick Century 4drht turquoise.jpg

1955 Buick Century red.jpg

1955 Buick Roadmaster hdtp 2.jpg

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Yes Jane,

 

I would not like you see you get into a car that may have a lot of workmanship flaws.   The car is "cute" and attractive, but may have faulty workmanship.  If you remain interested, make sure you take it to a high quality mechanic to check out it's workmanship and condition.  You could get into major expense.   Check out the photos on these forums and galleries, you may find something equally nice, affordable and practical.

 

John

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Well I have on senario: was shortened and tubbed to make some sort of grudge racer but also suspect that with a nice aluminum LS the hood would reach for the sky and terrify most people. Be great if you like to do wheelstands but a shortened VW bus is even better. Surprised there are no wheelie bars.

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5 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Why is easy. Two doors are cool, more-doors are boring family cars.  😉

 

 

 

 

Don't listen to guys like this-- Four door cars are beautiful and the most luxurious.  

 

 

 

 

 

42142858_10215404489178414_6754670297342803968_o.jpg

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6 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Most of the cars I ever bought that were "good deals" ended up belonging to someone else fairly soon. The best cars I have owned are the ones the "experts" told me I paid too much for. The MOST you can ever expect is what you pay for.

 

Avoid situations where more people than the seller and you (mothers are OK) onsite. It causes agitation and distraction to your thinking.

 

Thoroughly study objective and subjective to the point where you can answer "What am I doing here?". It helps.

 

How much is the shortened car?

 

At 18, never forget, rich girls need love, too!

 

Bernie

We were already not gonna buy from these people because they never wanted to talk to us to begin with. The wife was short and rude with us and when we tried contacting the husband we were flat out ignored. We were never even given a name let alone a price.

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4 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

In the mid-1950's, two-toned paint became popular.

Most cars had about 15 colors to choose from, and when

you mixed and matched colors to your taste, there were

often 80 to 100 possible combinations!  It was almost like

decorating your own home:  With so many choices, you

could suit your own individuality.

 

For example here are 3 different 1955 Buicks:

 

 

1955 Buick Century 4drht turquoise.jpg

1955 Buick Century red.jpg

1955 Buick Roadmaster hdtp 2.jpg

Not only two tone, but three tone. This picture is from a French movie and this is a new factory fresh 1956 Bel-Air four door hardtop somewhere in Paris;

1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Sport Sedan [2413]

 

chevroletbelair5678hk.2499.jpgOoh La La a new car dear!

chevroletbelair5656rg.3549.jpg

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Pomeroy41144 said:

 

 

 

Don't listen to guys like this-- Four door cars are beautiful and the most luxurious.  

 

 

 

 

 

42142858_10215404489178414_6754670297342803968_o.jpg

Don't worry. You're talking to a girl who decided that my backup car was going to be a vintage Mystery Machine recreation or an old Herse. I just love the look of old vehicles. 🖤

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I am hesitant to mention this. However you do need to understand that preserving, restoring and driving vintage, antique, or more modern collector cars is not the same thing as customizing, hotroding (in any of its many forms including the new "in" thing of "restomods"), or creating one's personal artwork from what once was someone else's car. The two hobbies, although related and both rooted in history, are quite different. Driving and/or showing them is different. The goals of the work are different. 

Understand. That neither way is really more right or wrong. Just different. One is about preserving something that was. The other is about remaking it into a personal expression. Both ways have a rightful place in the world, and many people richly enjoy both extremes. But many people also live fully in one end or the other. And that is also fine.

We here, basically all of us, want to help you find your place, whichever (or both?) ends of the spectrum you will be happiest in.

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4 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

In the mid-1950's, two-toned paint became popular.

Most cars had about 15 colors to choose from, and when

you mixed and matched colors to your taste, there were

often 80 to 100 possible combinations!  It was almost like

decorating your own home:  With so many choices, you

could suit your own individuality.

 

For example here are 3 different 1955 Buicks:

 

 

1955 Buick Century 4drht turquoise.jpg

1955 Buick Century red.jpg

1955 Buick Roadmaster hdtp 2.jpg

God those are gorgeous! 😍

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10 hours ago, Frantz said:

It's more of a buyers market today than it was 20 years ago though. These cars will always have value, but the demand is lowering. IMO a solid 4 door sedan is the ticket for a budget '50s car. Their value is crippled but you get every bit as much car and frankly the styling isn't hurt nearly as much with the extra doors as during later periods.

I would agree if you can get a 4 door hardtop or sometimes called the sport Sedan.  Very similar lines to the 2 door hardtops.

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3 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I would agree if you can get a 4 door hardtop or sometimes called the sport Sedan.  Very similar lines to the 2 door hardtops.

I wonder why my 62 Pontiac Catalina 2 door sedan is called a 2 door Sport Sedan. Pontiac calls the Catalina 4 door sedan the 4 door sedan. The 4 door Hardtop is called the 4 door Vista Sedan ( even though it's a hardtop!).

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When they came out in 55 by some makers  the 4 door hardtops wore that nameplate or similar,  but by 60 they were sticking them on all sorts of stuff.  Same as the regular cars that start out with a Fancy name like Belair or Impala which is then relegated to the cheap car eventually. 

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1 hour ago, wayne sheldon said:

I am hesitant to mention this. However you do need to understand that preserving, restoring and driving vintage, antique, or more modern collector cars is not the same thing as customizing, hotroding (in any of its many forms including the new "in" thing of "restomods"), or creating one's personal artwork from what once was someone else's car. The two hobbies, although related and both rooted in history, are quite different. Driving and/or showing them is different. The goals of the work are different. 

Understand. That neither way is really more right or wrong. Just different. One is about preserving something that was. The other is about remaking it into a personal expression. Both ways have a rightful place in the world, and many people richly enjoy both extremes. But many people also live fully in one end or the other. And that is also fine.

We here, basically all of us, want to help you find your place, whichever (or both?) ends of the spectrum you will be happiest in.

Preservation I don't think is in my cards right now. While I do love caring for and restoring things from the past, (I'm reviving an old all leather physician bag as we speak) I do it with the intent to use it. I think if I was to ever get into the business of just restoration for the sake of preserving history I'd probably give the cars over to trustworthy people/places so others can enjoy looking at these gorgeous works from the past y'know? Although if I do get one of these blessed antiques I won't be doing too much to it. It's like buying a garment from the 40s; you may have to make a few alterations to fit you, but you don't just outright change it.

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Look close at this woman. Lots of people polish the sides of my car at cruise nights while they look at the 2 door hardtop or convertible next to my 4 door. The sides are always shiniest when I get home.

My car, my wife, but they all do it.

I keep asking her to move when I take her picture. She thinks I am trying to get the light just right.

IMG_0003.thumb.JPG.3ccc1ae42cb64cc7b990e7f70977964c.JPG

 

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And don't forget the cars that have a nice design and then are "uglified" for the first two years so they can get sales in the third. My favorite is the 63 and 65 Riviera (65 was a superior car technically also)

1200px-Buick_Riviera.jpg

1280px-GM_Heritage_Center_-_029_-_Cars_-

 

and the 68 and 70 (72) Skylark (side view particularly.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTbeIav0WSQuYn1oQUwuUl420px-1972_Buick_Skylark_Front.jpg

 

 

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I need to be honest with a newbie: Most experienced old car guys consider "shorties" to be ugly and a corruption  of what once was a valid old car.  Because that's exactly what they are. The sub-sub-sub-genre of shortened cars - which is mostly an absurd manifestation of the age old human impulse of trying to turn something into something it isn't - seems to be mostly limited to the popular "tri-five" series of Chevrolets. In this case, turning something into what it isn't is turning a four door into a two door.

 

Think of putting Greek columns and a swimming pool in a 900 sq.foot bungalow, and you have the architectural equivalent of a shorty '55 Chevy. I'm sympathetic, and want to encourage your interest in old cars, because I was 18 once, too. But I can't stoop so low as to recommend buying this car. The engineering could be dubious, to say the least...and that's not even considering the appearance.

 

I would suggest looking at four door sedans as a lower cost way of getting into old cars. Also economy cars and 6 cylinder cars. There are some awesome affordable options out there. Best wishes. 

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48 minutes ago, Jane Doe said:

Preservation I don't think is in my cards right now. While I do love caring for and restoring things from the past, (I'm reviving an old all leather physician bag as we speak) I do it with the intent to use it. I think if I was to ever get into the business of just restoration for the sake of preserving history I'd probably give the cars over to trustworthy people/places so others can enjoy looking at these gorgeous works from the past y'kow? Although if I do get one of these blessed antiques I won't be doing too much to it. It's like buying a garment from the 40s; you may have to make a few alterations to fit you, but you don't just outright change it.

 

Great comment. Knowing your limitations is something most people aren't aware of. A modified car is fine to start with, since it gives you something to learn with without having to worry about damaging it, a  way to build your skills. At 18 you are just starting your automotive journey. 

I don't recommend shortened cars. Besides the looks, which I don't care for, I have heard that they are not particularly stable at speed, although I've just heard it from other people, I've never actually been in one myself. But I have heard it from more than one source. There is a shortened 1957 Chevrolet wagon I see fairly often at my favorite hot rod show.

 

I hate to say it but the owners of the car were probably discriminating against you both for age and gender. There are sadly a lot of people who don't understand that young girls can grow up fascinated by cars just like young boys do on a regular basis. I believe that I lost a car due to age discrimination when I was 16. I hope you persevere and find a car of your own soon!

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18 hours ago, Jane Doe said:

I was on a day out with my mom when we saw this beautiful car sitting in front of a house. We tried to get ahold of the people who said they were selling but they didn't want to talk to us. I was wondering if you all could tell me the name? I'm interested in doing some research on it to maybe get one myself in the future! (I'm only 18 so I can already tell you I absolutely don't have the funds for it rn 😅) Any info helps! Thank you in advance!

 

P.S. I read the general rules of the forum but this is still my first time posting. I'm sorry if I break any rules!

 

20190913_173947.jpg

 

 

 

     I'm thinking that with the altered wheelbase and how deep and wide those rear wheels and tires are that this car was built for the quarter mile or the nostalgic look of a altered wheelbase drag race car. I had one back in 1965 in a 1964 Pontiac tempest that ran 8 seconds and 160mph+ with a blown 421 Pontiac engine and a 4 speed HydraMatic. These cars grew out of the Super Stock or S/S or Super Stock Automatic ( SS/A) classes to be known as Factory Experimental. When the wheelbases were altered a new class was needed and all the scuttlebutt in the pits and in the grandstands came a term that stuck and that term was called the funny looking cars, which later became just FUNNY CARS. The early cars were steel bodied altered wheelbase cars, then we added fiberglass replica front ends ( mostly tilt front ends ) then we went to dragster shortened chassis with full fiberglass bodies to resemble a certain make of car.

 

 The car above resembles the early stage of altered wheelbase cars with factory steel bodies like these cars below;

 History - Drag cars in motion.......picture thread. | Drag racing ...Untitled Page

Untitled Page1963 Pontiac.com - Pontiac TV

1963 "Tameless Tiger" Arnie Beswick's Original Rebuilt and ...Arnie Beswick's "Tameless Tiger" (1964) " | Drag racing, Car humor ...

Review: We Were The RamchargersUntitled

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Welcome to the forum, I'm close to your age and it's nice to see other people my age around! When you can get your first vintage car, it always helps if you can meet someone who knows their stuff when it comes to these old cars. A neighbor, friend of a friend, relative, whoever, is a great resource if you need help with something or need some obscure tool. I know several of my neighbors have been a great help with my Rambler, it probably wouldn't be on the road without them! This forum is a great resource, there's plenty of friendly and knowledgeable people around.

 

As others have said, I don't have a ton of experience yet, but personally I wouldn't trust a car like that, plus the looks aren't appealing (Although that's just me of course.) I would say that good first car would be one set up as it came from the factory, at least that way you know it was designed by professional engineers, not some guy in the backyard!

Edited by AL1630 (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, Jane Doe said:

I was on a day out with my mom when we saw this beautiful car sitting in front of a house. We tried to get ahold of the people who said they were selling but they didn't want to talk to us. I was wondering if you all could tell me the name? I'm interested in doing some research on it to maybe get one myself in the future! (I'm only 18 so I can already tell you I absolutely don't have the funds for it rn 😅) Any info helps! Thank you in advance!

 

P.S. I read the general rules of the forum but this is still my first time posting. I'm sorry if I break any rules!

 

20190913_173947.jpg

 

You don't want that turd. That car has only just begun causing its owner great misery. Don't let it be you.

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If you want an inexpensive 2 door wagon, all you need is an Astre or Vega GT. If it has lived this long it is either a car with AC (real radiator) or has a steel sleeved block. Four speed manual and you have a mini CTS-V wagon.

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If you don't mind moving into the 60's with the cars you are considering, I would recommend you take a look at the mid 60's Ford Galaxy.

Four door versions should still be reasonably priced and they drive wonderful.

Sure, they have much more body roll than a modern car but they just seem to effortlessly float down down the freeway.

My Dad had 3 at one time he liked them so much and I got to wrench and drive all of them.  Even though I'm not a 'Ford' guy, I did really enjoy his Galaxies.

 

4461a529fbdaac7dd61f982ed5a04e44.jpg

 

4738774323_83f0033cc1_z.jpg

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I remember being rudely awakened while sleeping on a corner at Sebring by Freddy Lorenzen in a bellowing Galaxy.

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