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Rootes-type "air conditioner", although it usually heats it a bit as it works.

 

If you look at how much insulation is in the modern cars and how much was in the older cars, "there's no comparison".  Especially behind the headliner!  Those water shields behind the door panels aren't much either.  The just padding under the carpet is probably the most there is/was, back then.  Which is where the Dyna-Mat type stuff or spray -on Lizzard Skin coatings can come in (on the inside rather than on the  outside).  Maybe some mylar-coated bubble wrap to replace the door panel water shields?  5563 and I discussed many of those things "back then", as I recall.

 

What is in the kit for the condenser?  Just curious.

 

Thanks for keeping us posted on this situation, Bill!

 

NTX5467

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

7 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

That's not a Rootes Type Air Conditioning Compressor?

I guess it is an air conditioner Bernie. 

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That is no AC compressor, it is a Rootes blower.  It belongs on a LS and we were just having some fun.

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Posted (edited)

In my space days I had a bigger pair of those pulling that would drop the atmospheric pressure in a 20X20X40' chamber at a rate equal to the actual rate of orbital lift off. The one on my Park Ave Ultra wasn't too bad either.

 

My non-air '60 took us out to lunch with the windows and vents wide open. 80 and low humidity, not bad.

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Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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Many of the older vehicles had great kick panel vents!  Roll the front or rear windows down a bit and it looked like you had a/c on "outside air".  Or, as my late aunt mentioned back in the middle '60s, when add-on a/c was popular, sometimes people would drive around with the windows up so it LOOKED like they had a/c, but might have a towel handy on the seat to wipe off the moisture on their neck.  "Those were the daaayyyssss!"  But we're past that now!

 

NTX5467

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21 minutes ago, NTX5467 said:

Many of the older vehicles had great kick panel vents!  Roll the front or rear windows down a bit and it looked like you had a/c on "outside air". 

Those are the cat's meow.  You get a nice breeze through the cabin with no buffeting.

 

When we were in HS, we'd pop the covers of the vents and stick our beer in there to get it cold.  A buddy of mine had a Ford that would hold a 6-pack.

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Posted (edited)
Quote

My non-air '60 took us out to lunch with the windows and vents wide open. 80 and low humidity, not bad.

 

My modern car had issues keeping up with our heat.  Full  sun and a 104 yesterday.

Lower humidity then normally, but its like your oven, It still cooked you.

Edited by Bill Stoneberg (see edit history)
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As we work getting the engine compartment looking good and painted we ran into an issue with the wiring. There is a bulkhead plug on the firewall  we needed to unplug and tape off.

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It did not come easily.  Soaked in Wd 40 for 5 days, no luck.  Tried PB Blaster and again, no luck. 

It turns out that somebody over the 60 years had problems with it coming apart, so they superglued the plug together !!!

 

We found a replacement plug and proceeded to take it apart with pliers and screwdriver.

 

Looking at other plugs under the hood, they were crispy too.  Anytime we touched a wire insulation was cracking and falling off.

 

So, the slippery slope of car repairs just got steeper as we are going to replace the underwood wiring too.

 

 

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For those who don’t know the car, it is a low mileage car, but it lived in Texas it’s entire life. Under hood heat in the sun fries plastic. Even while sitting. 

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As a plastic-related part ages, the oils evaporate out of the basic plastic.  Leaving it brittle and fragile.  Which is why padded dashes used to crack with age, or warp.  Why even plastic grilles, popular in the '70s, warp and break, too.  Or the flexible bumper fillers from the '70s and later.  Not much you can do, as the heat and sun load in TX and the southern USA tend to accelerate the process.

 

With attention to detail, those older (in some cases, higher-resistance connections, as pictured) will be fresh and allow things to reliably operate for many more decades.

 

Don't forget the bulkhead connector, on both sides.  One thing leads to another . . .

 

Thanks for the update and pictures!

NTX5467

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The bulkhead connector is the connector that was superglued together.  

A different view of it after the pliers and screwdriver massage.

Just as a point, look how filthy, corroded and nasty the actual connections look.

And I wondered why I was not getting a full 12 V reliably.

 

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My Riviera was car lot detailed in all black spray can when I bought it. It was cleaning the black paint off the wires that caused the frame to be slid out from under the car. I ended up removing all the harness plugs, repairing bad wires and terminals, and cleaning paint from all the wires and terminal.

Here is my folding work table from the job.

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The green tool at the lower right of the table is invaluable for taking terminals off:

Wire Terminal Tool

Lisle tool makes it. (Advance Auto)

Balkamp (NAPA) makes the pins for the plugs.

And Year One has the correct cohesive tape.

 

Every once in a while I see a by pass repair to a plug, makes me happy to know I can get the stuff to do it right.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

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A nasty dusty day working on rust issues and the manifold.

First the manifold, removing the flapper valve that somebody welded (Kinda) open. Went ahead and cut out the flapper as it was frozen.

 

Next was wire wheeling rust off so we could prime. Dirty nasty work but necessary.

Morempics when it is primed later on.

 

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Edited by Bill Stoneberg (see edit history)
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Every time I see some of this expert rigging, I want to admit it was me.

I used the super glue. I welded the flapper open. I hope you sell the car back to it’s old owner so I can undo some of YOUR work. 
😘

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I knew it was you as I would recognize your work anywhere 😂

 

No blame here, just pointing out what was found from prior prior owners.

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I had a section of a Zerex antifreeze bottle used as a piece of AC duct in the 57 I just sold.  That went bye bye when I pulled the top of the dash off to fix the speedo.  The new owner got a kick out of it.  Didn't surprise me a bit with some of the stuff I've seen on that car.

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Is that ALL of the front end shims it needs for alignment?

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It’s been a week of getting g parts in.

I found an under hood harness with good plugs so we can build a new harness.

LED lights for the dash so I can see the speedometer at night.

Rubber Aprons for the suspension.

Senders for the gauges I want to put in.

Still hav cleaning and painting under the hood to do but it s coming along.

 

Willis, the car is aligned well now. Let’s see what happens when we rebuild the drag link.

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Good luck.

I welded the tie rod ends.

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1 hour ago, buick5563 said:

Good luck.

I welded the tie rod ends.

If it is like the way you welded the exaughst flap open, I won’t have any issues.

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On 7/30/2020 at 7:07 PM, buick5563 said:

Good luck.

I welded the tie rod ends.

Great!  And I thought I taught you everything you need to know about "rigging".  Here is your next lesson:  Vice Grip Garage.  The first one I played was the oldest and first vid on the 1970 Caddy.  As long as you are under house arrest with this covid thing, just put one of those hemorrhoid donuts on the the chair and pi$$ away a few hours!

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For a hood scoop........how about a mail box..........solves two  problems at once.   Clearance for the supercharger and it get rid of the "junk" mail.

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On 7/12/2020 at 8:14 PM, KongaMan said:

Those are the cat's meow.  You get a nice breeze through the cabin with no buffeting.

 

When we were in HS, we'd pop the covers of the vents and stick our beer in there to get it cold.  A buddy of mine had a Ford that would hold a 6-pack.

A guy I went  to high school with lost a hand in a farm accident.  He would put a beer in his mechanical hand, stick it out the vent window on a nice cool night, and bring it back in a minute later nice and cool.

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