old-tank

Change one thing and you create three new problems

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Change one thing and you create three new problems (more or less).  That was the advice a friend who builds hot rods gave to me when I announced that I was going to put a nailhead (264 from a 55 Buick) in my 51 Ford F-1 truck.  Getting the nailhead and refreshing it was easy.  I installed it with an adapter made to mate a nailhead to the early Ford transmission.  I was proud that I had it sitting on motor mounts that I fashioned and it looked like all of the front end sheet metal would fit.  Then my friend came over and popped my bubble.  "What about the brake pedal that is going to hit the bellhousing?"  "The steering box is occupying the space where the starter should sit".  (guess I need brakes and a starter).  I got another friend to bring his oxyacetylene torch to bend the brake and clutch pedals and I moved the steering box out and forward using piece of donor frame and using a mini-starter I was back in business.

So, I completed it and it has been a fun ride although scary with double the horsepower.  Next project:  install A/C so I could be comfortable year 'round.  Success! with minimal hacking.

A few years and the start of 2020 and the fuel pump is leaking.  No big deal...I know how to change a fuel pump on a nailhead.  Just move the A/C compressor and bracket out of the way and...

Not so fast since it (Lesson) seems that some dumb sumbeach did not leave enough slack in the hoses to move it!  So I parked it over my service pit and worked from below.  Installed a rebuilt pump and was ready to fire it up until I decided to check the oil.  Lots of oil all the way up the dipstick.  Drained about 4 gallons of gas diluted oil.  Pulled the fuel pump, installed a block-off plate and added an electric fuel pump to use full time.  (Lesson:  don't use the mechanical pump  low on the block if it is below the level of the fuel tank behind the seat, because when it leaks --- not if it leaks --- you get a crankcase full of gas).  Some good news:  the filter canister had only oil in it and actually came off with no interference with the custom dual exhaust.

So now it is back to terrorizing the neighborhood in addition to killing bugs and killing the planet.

It is easier to restore than to modify.  Change one thing and you create three new problems.

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8 hours ago, old-tank said:

Change one thing and you create three new problems (more or less).  That was the advice a friend who builds hot rods gave to me when I announced that I was going to put a nailhead (264 from a 55 Buick) in my 51 Ford F-1 truck.  Getting the nailhead and refreshing it was easy.  I installed it with an adapter made to mate a nailhead to the early Ford transmission.  I was proud that I had it sitting on motor mounts that I fashioned and it looked like all of the front end sheet metal would fit.  Then my friend came over and popped my bubble.  "What about the brake pedal that is going to hit the bellhousing?"  "The steering box is occupying the space where the starter should sit".  (guess I need brakes and a starter).  I got another friend to bring his oxyacetylene torch to bend the brake and clutch pedals and I moved the steering box out and forward using piece of donor frame and using a mini-starter I was back in business.

So, I completed it and it has been a fun ride although scary with double the horsepower.  Next project:  install A/C so I could be comfortable year 'round.  Success! with minimal hacking.

A few years and the start of 2020 and the fuel pump is leaking.  No big deal...I know how to change a fuel pump on a nailhead.  Just move the A/C compressor and bracket out of the way and...

Not so fast since it (Lesson) seems that some dumb sumbeach did not leave enough slack in the hoses to move it!  So I parked it over my service pit and worked from below.  Installed a rebuilt pump and was ready to fire it up until I decided to check the oil.  Lots of oil all the way up the dipstick.  Drained about 4 gallons of gas diluted oil.  Pulled the fuel pump, installed a block-off plate and added an electric fuel pump to use full time.  (Lesson:  don't use the mechanical pump  low on the block if it is below the level of the fuel tank behind the seat, because when it leaks --- not if it leaks --- you get a crankcase full of gas).  Some good news:  the filter canister had only oil in it and actually came off with no interference with the custom dual exhaust.

So now it is back to terrorizing the neighborhood in addition to killing bugs and killing the planet.

It is easier to restore than to modify.  Change one thing and you create three new problems.

 

 But ain't it fun?

 

  Ben

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old-tank wrote: "It is easier to restore than to modify."

Ben Bruce wrote: "But ain't it fun?"

 

I agree with both these pearls of automotive wisdom.

 

 

 

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How do you guys keep trannys in your trucks? When I put a 56 Buick engine in my 54 Ford I blew at least 5 of them in a years time. Of course I was only 20 or so........Bob

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16 minutes ago, Bhigdog said:

How do you guys keep trannys in your trucks? When I put a 56 Buick engine in my 54 Ford I blew at least 5 of them in a years time. Of course I was only 20 or so........Bob

You probably had the light 3 speed with column shift.  Mine is the 4-speed (granny gear) as used in the biggest trucks.  Those spur gears make almost as much noise as the exhaust.  It pulls hard but "it takes awhile to shift" when double clutching it.  Even the original flathead destroyed all of the available transmissions in my area.

(there are a few on these forums that can give a "ride report"):D

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4 minutes ago, old-tank said:

You probably had the light 3 speed with column shift.  Mine is the 4-speed (granny gear) as used in the biggest trucks.  Those spur gears make almost as much noise as the exhaust.  It pulls hard but "it takes awhile to shift" when double clutching it.  Even the original flathead destroyed all of the available transmissions in my area.

(there are a few on these forums that can give a "ride report"):D

You are correct. I got so I could change out the trans, in my drive way, on my back, in 30 minutes flat..........Kids!............Bob

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2 minutes ago, Bhigdog said:

You are correct. I got so I could change out the trans, in my drive way, on my back, in 30 minutes flat..........Kids!............Bob

Mine comes out through a hole in the floor...almost as fast.  I got to where I could change out the shredded cluster gear in a couple of hours (if i did not lose some needle bearings  in the dirt).  The 4-speed has never been removed after installation, but 2 six cylinders and 2 flathead 8's and now the nailhead.

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47 minutes ago, old-tank said:

Mine comes out through a hole in the floor...almost as fast.  I got to where I could change out the shredded cluster gear in a couple of hours (if i did not lose some needle bearings  in the dirt).  The 4-speed has never been removed after installation, but 2 six cylinders and 2 flathead 8's and now the nailhead.

 

That's pretty funny. Back in the day gas stations actually did mechanical work and many had a parts "dump" behind the station. I used to make the rounds scrounging for parts. Anything that I didn't know how it worked or what was inside I'd drag it home and take it apart. Every once in a great while I'd score a trans for parts, especially the cluster gear. It was usually the first to get corn cobbed....Bob

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On 5/22/2020 at 5:27 PM, old-tank said:

Short video:  HERE

I have to look for some "in progress" pictures...

 

That video was before I cracked the rear window with my head when you grabbed second, right?

  • Haha 2

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