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1936 Chrysler Airstream C-8 convertible In downtown building


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Continuing to wring out issues on the Chrysler.  After close to 500 miles of driving, I have developed a small seep on one of the freeze plugs so I will order a full set and replace all of them.  My convertible top ripped due to dry rot from me using it so much so I am looking for a cloth replacement.  Now that I have completely cured vapor lock (albeit with the assistance of aluminum foil that is still on the carburetor bowl), I have developed an interesting issue:

 

I flip on the electric pump and when the whine changes tone, I start the Chrysler.  It starts right up after one to two revolutions.  Usually less than five seconds of running the starter.  Once it is started, and while still cold, I will flip off the electric pump and after the fuel in the carburetor bowl is consumed, the car will die.  This is true whether the car is idling or running at speed while cold.  Once the temperature comes up, usually five or so minutes, I can flip off the electric pump and the car will run fine with no issues.  I cannot for the life of me figure out what could be happening while the car is cold.  It isn’t really a big deal, but I am seriously curious.  Any thoughts?

 

Other than these few small age-related issues, I am driving the heck out of this car and it just purrs along.  I could hardly be happier, and even the small issues do not bother me like they once might have.

 

Joe

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Thanks Jon.  I will check.  The last time I adjusted the choke, it seemed fine.  Are you thinking that the choke is staying on or not pulling off?  Any idea why it would work with an electric fuel pump and not the mechanical fuel pump?  I am on my way out to take a look at it now and will report back.  Thanks so much for taking the time to help Joe.

 

Joe

 

 

On 7/27/2020 at 10:25 PM, carbking said:

Choke not functioning???

 

Jon.

 

Edited by Joe West (see edit history)
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Update on the fuel pump issue.  Choke is fine, and the mechanical pump did not work for a short period today while warm.  It seems that this problem cropped up when I installed the fuel pressure regulator (one that is good for throwing at garden rabbits since I could not find a low pressure version of the one that Joe the carburetor guy recommended).  I wonder if there is a pressure drop across the pressure regulator that is causing the mechanical pump not to be able to flow enough fuel at the correct pressure.  I am going to test this theory this weekend by bypassing the fuel pressure regulator.  I will also check the flow rate of the mechanical pump with and without the regulator.  Everything still works perfectly on the electric pump.  I tested a cold start this morning and the engine fired up in about two seconds.

 

Joe

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  • 1 month later...

It has been quite some time since I updated this thread so here is a quick update.  I have received and installed two new emergency brake cables (boy do the small things matter sometimes), my new convertible top, and a complete set of wiring harnesses from Rhode Island Wiring are in transit now.  I had the Chrysler appraised and I am waiting to here back from the appraisal company next week.  I will use the appraised price to pay the gentleman who gave me the car.  

 

With respect to how the Chrysler is running, the only issue I am having is that it is still hard to start after a long drive and a 10 minute or so heat soak.  I can get it to start by slowly depressing the accelerator pedal to the floor and holding it while the car cranks... but it takes 10-15 seconds of cranking to get it to start.  I have a vapor fuel filter feeding excess fuel pressure back to the tank, and when I look down the throat of the carburetor, I no longer see fuel dumping into the intake manifold when the engine is hot and I shut it off... but still; no joy on hot starts.

 

I am getting ready to go on a drive to visit the previous owner; I am really looking forward to the drive.  The weather is amazing today.

 

Joe

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On 6/1/2020 at 4:12 AM, Joe West said:

The car has 48,000 miles on it.

 

Yesterday was a big day.  I started the Chrysler and after some puffs of smoke, it smoothed out and idled silky smooth.  I drove it around my property (from my house to my barn and back) and it drove very nicely.  Steering is tight, brakes are good (well... good is a relative term) and all the gauges work except the fuel gauge.  Today I am going to do some more undercarriage cleanup, make a new fuel line to remove the rubber hoses feeding an aftermarket fuel filter, purchase a new fuel filter and a carburetor rebuild kit, and order the factory wiring harnesses to replace the hack job someone did to the engine compartment wiring.

 

I have a quick question for everyone: Does anyone know what the chrome bracket is for in this picture?  There is one above both the driver’s and passenger’s wiper blade.

3AF574FA-1F4A-4646-99D7-D10D2AE60AB9.jpeg

Found this closeup....

DSCN3051.JPG.052edf30518dc07fc24bd3620c0ec23b.JPG

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2 hours ago, Joe West said:

Thanks so much Keiser31!  It appears to be much different than I expected.  If I were a betting man, I'd say it will take me some time to find these two missing parts.  🙂

 

Thanks again!

Not sure what year the item is I showed, but pretty certain yours would be VERY similar.

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  • 3 months later...

Keiser is, as usual, always helpful and seems always accurate. (And very much quicker than I.  Saw your post only today.)

I need a couple of these parts myself - and really wonder if I'll ever get them.

There are on a 37 Desoto conv - and the windshield bracket appears the exact same (?) as your bracket.  Peter

Peter1657231661_37Desotowipers.thumb.jpg.67418e6b72572e8a3aa45c62e2430ee3.jpg

Edited by 36 Plymouth 40 Dodge (see edit history)
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  • 4 weeks later...

Good morning everyone,

 

I thought I would provide another brief update.  I have determined that this car was originally painted black and had a red (burgundy) leather interior so I will be taking it back to its factory configuration.  Repainting the engine compartment complicates a few things for me.  I will need to remove the engine to do it properly, and if I have the engine out, I might as well do some sprucing up.  I have the factory wiring harnesses (from Rhode Island Wiring) but I do not want to install them before paint.  Ugh.  It feels like a domino effect, and no matter which way I look at it, I need to start the teardown.  I enjoy driving it so much that I dread not having it available.

 

One other problem now is finding someone to do the paint and interior.  In rural SE NC, business owners of all types are notorious for not being motivated to actually or meet deadlines, and I cannot even get anyone to return calls.  Ugh.  I hear horror stories of paint and body shops having cars for over a year... which is something I will not tolerate.  Perhaps I should find a good paint and body guy and pay him to come out and work on my property.  I can set up a paint booth and buy all the supplies and then at least my car will stay home.

 

For now, I drive it almost every day it is sunny out.  The only issue I have had is that my driver’s side door latch broke, but I have a replacement on the way.

 

That’s it for now.

 

Joe

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That's the slope of restoration.  Unfortunately once you start it's almost impossible to stop until you reach a bare sandblasted chassis and boxes full of rubber and new chrome with lots of delays in actually getting it back on the road.  It's the reason Craigslist and Facebook is littered with projects that people abandoned.  Atleast you are doing a convertible. It's even worse when guys do it to a sedan and find themselves at the bottom trying to sell a f=gutted sedan body no one wants.  I think there is a Chrysler sedan on here now in the early 30's that they are really having trouble rehoming.  I've vowed to only do small jobs on my cars as even I have started a few restorations early on that never got completed. 

 

Good luck and keep us up to date on how you are progressing.  I know a great paint guy that gets stuff done around here and he only does restoration work,  but he is busy a ways out and upstate NY is nowhere near NC.  He's very fussy in who he works for as well.  I am impressed with the speed at which he seems to turn cars out with the quality of work he does since he works mostly alone. 

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3 hours ago, Joe West said:

Good morning everyone,

 

I thought I would provide another brief update.  I have determined that this car was originally painted black and had a red (burgundy) leather interior so I will be taking it back to its factory configuration.  Repainting the engine compartment complicates a few things for me.  I will need to remove the engine to do it properly, and if I have the engine out, I might as well do some sprucing up.  I have the factory wiring harnesses (from Rhode Island Wiring) but I do not want to install them before paint.  Ugh.  It feels like a domino effect, and no matter which way I look at it, I need to start the teardown.  I enjoy driving it so much that I dread not having it available.

 

One other problem now is finding someone to do the paint and interior.  In rural SE NC, business owners of all types are notorious for not being motivated to actually or meet deadlines, and I cannot even get anyone to return calls.  Ugh.  I hear horror stories of paint and body shops having cars for over a year... which is something I will not tolerate.  Perhaps I should find a good paint and body guy and pay him to come out and work on my property.  I can set up a paint booth and buy all the supplies and then at least my car will stay home.

 

For now, I drive it almost every day it is sunny out.  The only issue I have had is that my driver’s side door latch broke, but I have a replacement on the way.

 

That’s it for now.

 

Joe

 

 

A restoration shop will take some number of years to paint that car.   If you get it done in 1 I would be impressed.    Figure 2-10.

 

If you have a local body shop that is willing to do it during slow season (not sure when that is in NC) then you have a decent chance of getting it done faster.

 

I have had a 1/2 dozen cars full painted the restoration shop way and can tell you it takes years and thousands of dollars.   Will never do it again.   Paint alone for your car is over 5k (to buy the paint cans).

 

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