Joe West

1936 Chrysler Airstream C-8 convertible In downtown building

Recommended Posts

You're welcome, Joe.  I agree with you--John is a great guy and very knowledgeable about cars in general, not just Airflows and Airstreams.  He's been very helpful to my wife & I with our Chevelle.  He & his wife Lynn are great friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

Some top down images after a short drive today. 

602F18CD-3FA1-4A92-B8E2-EECAF42B7C75.jpeg

807692F9-837A-4509-A591-E188843A102C.jpeg

3887F3D0-0A91-4368-AEF5-800E42AAC6B0.jpeg

BF6234FC-8B89-4BD3-97C9-DF6BB75D26FE.jpeg

9B5055F7-4558-459D-BBEE-35D699B91446.jpeg

5994DA45-148B-4F84-955E-43980DB70A5A.jpeg

49E810EC-D555-4442-B697-8D19191EB87B.jpeg

252299CE-7998-4DDB-B82A-5BD2C8CFBF7D.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

REALLY COOL, nice to see life back into this car , doing what it was made to do.

Walt G.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing those photos of that FINE car!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I still have a few things to do just to get it running reliably.  

 

Vapor lock after stopping and the car is warm is still an issue, even after installing a vapor filter and fuel line back to the fuel tank.  This cured the flooding issue into the carburetor, but I still have the fuel pump vapor locking.  I have a 6V fuel pump coming tomorrow and I will install it with a relay and a cutoff switch.  I am debating whether or not to use the pump only to prime or to use it full-time.  Once I solve the vapor lock problem, the car will be reliable enough to use as a pleasure driver.

 

I still need to drop the fuel tank and install a restored tank (that I have sitting here on my garage floor),  rebuild the front suspension, restore the upholstery to the factory leather and wool carpet, replace the top with new top in the correct material, and then strip and paint the car.... and of course, fix the inevitable parts that wear out / break because I am driving it regularly.

 

By the way... one side note. The chrome was looking very sad... so bad that I thought it needed to be redone.  However, I had some chrome wheel cleaner (Eagle One Chrome Wheel Cleaner), so I decided to try it out on the interior and exterior chrome.  The result was stunning.  All of the marks that I thought were pitting came off with a slight amount of pressure, and when I polished it afterward, the chrome for the most part looked brand new. This is not true for items like some of the hubcaps that actually were pitted, although they look MUCH better than before cleaning.  I now swear by Eagle One Chrome Wheel cleaner.  Amazing stuff.

 

Joe

 

Edit: I completely forgot to add what may be the most important rebuild task; I need to replace all of the wiring.  Rhode Island Wiring will need about 12-16 weeks to build a complete set of harnesses so I have some time on my hands before I tackle that job.  I am looking forward to getting this dilapidated rats nest of wiring out of this car and replacing it with new wiring.

Edited by Joe West (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also... I forgot to mention that my friend who sold me the car came over to visit me for Father’s Day.  I took him for a roughly 12 mile drive.  Here are a couple of images of him next to the Chrysler before we took a drive.  I apologize for the rotated images... I have absolutely no idea why the forum does this on what appears to be a random basis.

 

Joe

 

575DA8D5-E3D3-412B-B6FC-207B15C43D00.jpeg

F8A8DDBD-2B03-434D-ADC3-F00BBD4BA866.jpeg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the steel plate that insulates the exhaust manifold from the fuel pump is gone. That could create vapor lock.

1936 Chrysler green 2.jpeg

1936 Chrysler green.jpeg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

Maybe the steel plate that insulates the exhaust manifold from the fuel pump is gone. That could create vapor lock.

 

if there was a plate... it is definitely gone. Thanks so much. Off to the parts book....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It has been awhile since I provided an update... so here goes...  

 

Fuel sending unit was not functioning properly, so I decided to drop the tank, clean it (remove any rust), replace the fuel level sending unit / gasket, and the fuel filler neck hose.  Getting the tank out was a hot mess (as they say here in the south).  The tank has a metal filler tube that screws into the tank, and after 84 years, that tube was intransigent. It isn’t like I could take a torch to it, and a heat gun just wasn’t working.  It took me every bit of 6 hours of working with PB Blaster and other release fluids, and a heat gun, and my bare hands trying to grip the metal tube before I finally got it to release.  Repeat after me... NOTHING appears to be particularly easy on a car that has set relatively unmolested for as long as this car has.  To be completely honest here... I thought restoring 60’s era cars made me an automobile restorer... not a chance.  Bringing a 30’s era car (or even older) is part mechanic, part fabricator, part are you entirely completely mad insane, and part art.  I love it... but I’ll tell you, I am glad I am older and have patience... in my younger years, I would had been flipping out.

 

So...  I got the tank out, used rust remover for a couple of days, power sprayed it out on the inside, stuck a heat gun on the inside for a few hours to get all the moisture out, and put everything back together.  Everything works... but a project I thought would take me a day actually took me about 3 days.  The good news for me is that I absolutely love working on this car, and no matter what happens, I’ll make this car perfect.

 

With the fuel system, brake system, ignition system, and cooling system completely restored and all lubricants changed (including greasing everything I could), vapor lock issues fixed with a vapor fuel filter and return line and an electric fuel pump installed that turns on with the ignition and a cutoff switch to turn it off after the car starts, I am ready to start driving the Chrysler as much as possible to precipitate other failures that I can fix (generator, starter, etc.) before I take the car on a long (few hundred mile) trip.  Things are running like a top right now, and ultimately, I may just rebuild the generator and starter just to ensure they are reliable.  

 

I still need to fix the vacuum section of my double action fuel pump... someone removed the vacuum linkage internal to the pump and I already have the replacement parts... just need to pull the pump again and install the vacuum related parts.  As far as I can tell, everything but the vacuum section of the fuel pump works.

 

Did I mention that the high today was 93 degrees and the humidity was 92%.  LOL.   This must be love.  🙂

 

Thanks again everyone for all your support and help.  The people here are jaw-dropping amazing.

 

Joe

 

On Edit:  I lied... the radio is not working yet either.  LOL.  I cannot wait to tear into the radio!

Edited by Joe West
Updarte (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to include some images...  Also, I found my first evidence of rust that will need to be repaired.  Looks like I get to hone my sheet metal fabricating skills and break out my welder.  I think we will save the rust repair until just before I paint. 

BC9A36D3-2840-4931-997C-9A3B866A8404.jpeg

848CF131-CF47-46F2-8FE9-58F978919FF6.jpeg

E5C37475-BDF0-42E8-871B-776EC9CC8CCF.jpeg

0EA1D3F2-6396-45B6-97FA-7190D72BF196.jpeg

2E9B7F54-2DFB-4E1E-963D-10B5368060FA.jpeg

CCD4836F-AC76-4C0D-BABB-776A8BEA9164.jpeg

11942418-E9C5-4553-B8E2-6A5D80CE05E1.jpeg

6E907BD6-8232-4202-882A-60356EF929FA.jpeg

DD28BB48-F424-4E16-85F7-9076665A537D.jpeg

50A4AA3C-CB21-4920-ADEA-804C3F865F49.jpeg

B539347F-0290-4531-ABCF-4644C638BE53.jpeg

A1E8D586-D464-4F32-A2A6-AE934F46E02F.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like Neil Young said “Rust never sleeps”. On the subject of the fuel pump heat shield, I used card stock to fashion a pattern I then cut out of sheet metal with tin snips. Here’s some done by others;

A51BBFD1-7763-4ED8-B38A-F7EE1C6C394D.png

68FD66A9-D882-41D5-A77B-8E471D077FAA.png

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two cars from 30s    I use soap based grease for water pump     don't think you should petrol in cooling system

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, broker-len said:

I have two cars from 30s    I use soap based grease for water pump     don't think you should petrol in cooling system


I ended up purchasing water pump grease. Thanks so much!

 

 

2 hours ago, Steve9 said:

Like Neil Young said “Rust never sleeps”. On the subject of the fuel pump heat shield, I used card stock to fashion a pattern I then cut out of sheet metal with tin snips. Here’s some done by others;

 

 

Thanks Steve. My exhaust manifold is above my intake manifold so I need the shield that protects the carburetor and the fuel pump shield. If I can find an Image of the factory shield for my car, I can fabricate it. As far as rust goes... ugh. I hate even little bits of rush. The good part is, there isn’t much rust and it is in a spot that will be easy for me to repair. 

Edited by Joe West (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  Joe, I'd reconsider using a heat gun on your fuel tank,  seen lots of burns from tank fires and explosions. Its not an open flame but you are putting a lot  of heat on the tank with a heat gun.

  Nice work on the car.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's typical 36 Chrysler Rust.  Mine was the same,  maybe just a tad worse but not a spot anywhere else in the car and I even took the interior out of mine, finding no evidence of rust anywhere else.  Seems the rumble seat lid drains into the rumble seat trunk floor and as you drive the water runs out the channels stamped in the inner panel.  a couple of leaves ,  they stop working and now it rusts.  That is a terrible design but then again they were never meant to last 80 or more years.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, JimKB1MCV said:

  Joe, I'd reconsider using a heat gun on your fuel tank,  seen lots of burns from tank fires and explosions. Its not an open flame but you are putting a lot  of heat on the tank with a heat gun.

  Nice work on the car.

 

 

I thought about whether or not to use a heat gun to dry the tank, but decided to use it because I had used a rust remover on the tank, followed by power spraying, and then a hose rinse.  I was pretty confident that there was not any residual fuel left.  This said, I was still a little cautious with using the heat gun.  I put it in the location where the fuel level sender goes (it fit perfectly), turned it on, and walked away.  If something happened, only the forest would be hurt.  🙂

 

9 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

That's typical 36 Chrysler Rust.  Mine was the same,  maybe just a tad worse but not a spot anywhere else in the car and I even took the interior out of mine, finding no evidence of rust anywhere else.  Seems the rumble seat lid drains into the rumble seat trunk floor and as you drive the water runs out the channels stamped in the inner panel.  a couple of leaves ,  they stop working and now it rusts.  That is a terrible design but then again they were never meant to last 80 or more years.

 

This is exactly what I was thinking.  I noticed that water off the rumble seat just ran into that area.  After I wash the car, I open the rumble seat and turn on a large fan to remove the moisture.  I will treat the rust so that it doesn’t spread, and then cut it out when I do the paint and body work.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned a lesson about running a mechanical fuel pump with a non-pressure regulated (6psi) electric fuel pump.  Yesterday, I was running on the electric fuel pump for the first few minutes of my morning startup and drive (as I normally do) and I switched off the electric fuel pump.  After 10 or so seconds, the engine starts to stumble so I flip the electric fuel pump back on and the engine smooths out.  I do this a few times and realize the mechanical fuel pump I am running is not working.  I get home and disconnect the output of the mechanical fuel pump (electric pump is off) and turn over the engine; no fuel delivery at all.  I take off the input fuel valve cover ( a one minute job) and the spring and rubber flap look great.  I take off the output fuel valve cover, and I find that the spring is turned sideways, effectively blocking the rubber flap from opening.  Remembering that this fuel pump worked perfectly before I installed the electric fuel pump, and worked great for the first few days of the electric fuel pump, the only thing I can think of is that the fuel pressure from the electric fuel pump (6psi) was enough to unseat the valve spring and force it sideways.  For the life of me, I cannot figure out how this is possible given the spring guide which forces the spring to stay aligned.  I fixed the spring and the mechanical fuel pump is working great again.

 

I ordered a fuel pressure regulator and will regulate the fuel to the same psi as the output of my mechanical fuel pump (or .5psi to 1psi more).

 

Joe

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On pre war cars that will be EXTENSIVELY driven, I run an electric pump 100 percent of the time. I just block off the mechanicial pump and use it as a pass through. It's the best way with E10 fuel and all the possible vapor lock issues. I run a quality pressure regulator and keep it low most of the year, and turn it up for summer driving. Works great......25k miles on my Pierce 12 and never an issue.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much Ed.  What pressures do you run in the winter and summer?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run 2-3 pounds when it's cool. Summertime it differs  per car. I turn up the regulator till the pump will push past the needle and seat, and then back it down. On my Stromberg I can safley run 7 pounds. That may be too high for some applications. Fire and running rich can occur with too much pressure. I think 5 pounds will eliminate vapor lock in 98 percent of the applications. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do the same as Ed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do as well on my 29 Hudson. This is a great thread by way. Your very lucky. 
Also , you must adjust your float height for modern fuels specific gravity is significantly less than fuel from when your carb was designed. Generally speaking

( not knowing your carb ) I raise the float height in all my cars almost an 1/8”. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul, you are correct. Also, you should fatten the system up about seven percent. It’s more complicated than it sounds. Also recurve the distributor. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now