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1936 Chrysler Airstream C-8 convertible In downtown building


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11 hours ago, Joe West said:

...  "I wonder why six cylinder shoes are plentiful but not eight cylinder.  I would have thought that there would be more eight cylinders on the road, but perhaps there was a large disparity in production numbers."...

 

Joe

Chrysler Airstream Six. Series C-7: 43,471

Chrysler Deluxe Airstream Eight, Series C-8: 9,502

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Usually the parts like brake linings fit many years and probably other makes of cars from the era.   If you had an old Greylock or similar linings book you would probably have alot more options to chose from.  Also brake linings have been considered a curse to parts vendors over the years so few sell them though there are probably large quantities out there.  If you knew of any really old garages in your town you could even ask if they have any.  Those are usually left behind when guys buy the parts out. 

Also be a little cautious if you find a shop to do them as to what they used.  A friend had a shop through one of our local parts stores do it that does heavy truck and the material they used locked up the wheels whenever they got damp. HE took them out , sent them to Whitepost which did a real nice job and arced them to match the drum,  then never had a problem again.  He said it was really strange as he had never seen that before and he's done alot of this work for years.  The car was a 59 Dodge. 

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24 minutes ago, Joe West said:

 

I did.  Thanks so much.  I replied.

 

Pay close attention to what edimass has to say.

He's one of the most knowledgeable members on this site.

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You’ve won the lotto Joe. So happy for you. This is such a rare car. Please keep us in the loop here on your progress and enjoy every minute of it. You win!

When it comes to rebuilding brakes, clutch linings etc, have the shop rebuild your parts so you won’t have fit issues. Be sure of their competence. Anyone will take your money, right?

Edited by Steve9 (see edit history)
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Update:

 

All the wheel cylinders have been rebuilt and all brake lines replaced.  The brake linings were used enough to barely scuff the surface of the lining, so I cleaned them (asbestos so I wore a mask) and reinstalled them.  I greased the wheel bearings and every grease fitting I could find (and holy smoke was there a lot of them).  Transmission  and differential fluid are changed, and the undercarriage received it’s first power spray which I swear removed 3 pounds of grime and grease... and there seems to be more where that came from.  I drained all the fuel from the fuel tank and gave it a rinse with fresh fuel, and then I drained that.  Engine oil is drained and I will replace it as soon as my NOS filter comes in.  If the filter has any rust internally, then I will install an aftermarket canister filter.  I will drop the oil pan, clean the oil pickup and inspect the bottom end.

 

Next up is to rebuild the master cylinder and bleed the brakes to see if I have any working brakes.  Then drop the oil pan, rebuild the carb, clean the fuel filter, and flush the cooling system.  With any luck, I should be ready to start this in a week or two.

 

Joe

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The 36 C-8 is one of Chrysler's finest. You have a rare beauty. Take extra good care of it. Parts are relatively hard to find for these cars so don't throw any old parts away that you don't re-use. Also, my main reason for writing this is to tell you to take EXTRA care of the running board rubber. Nobody reproduces that pattern anymore. I have searched for over ten years to no avail. The only options I have found is paying for new molds to be made at great expense. That is the hardest item to replace on your car, so again, take care of those rubbers.

 

Greg Biskey

"The Old Chrysler Garage," a museum in Isanti, MN

 

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Good to hear you used your like new old linings that are asbestos.

They will feel right and not be grabby.

I use NOS MoPar or types like Greylock asbestos linings.

Modern linings on the old Lockheed's and later MoPar Center Plane brakes don't work right...can be grabby cold and soft and weak hot no matter what grade of linings used.

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On 5/20/2020 at 7:50 AM, Joe West said:


I definitely will not assume he is giving me the car. His wife told me to stop discussing payment and to not say or do anything with respect to paying. She said “He will let you know when it is time to discuss payment... in a year or two... or perhaps never”. 
 

Honestly, I would prefer to pay quickly, but both he and his wife indicated I should drop the discussion. I will sit tight and show him what I am doing to the car. 

 

  A gift is a gift!!  Honor his gift and let him have pleasure in giving.

 

  Ben

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I finished rebuilding the wheel cylinders, master cylinder, and replacing all three rubber brake lines. I now have a rock solid brake pedal. The car rolls so easily with the brakes adjusted properly and the wheel bearings cleaned, repacked, and adjusted. 
 

I also drained the engine block with the pet o kill and the fluid, still a light green, drained easily. A bit of rust came out at the end, but I flushed the system repeatedly until the water ran clear. A big thanks to John for this suggestion. 
 

Oil pan dropped tomorrow. 
 

by the way... I have a question I cannot find the answer to. What are these little chrome balls for at the top of the dash?

 

 

F38B1AFC-259D-41EB-B12C-31FFBCFD458A.jpeg

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On 5/22/2020 at 4:42 PM, Joe West said:

 

I will search for a place to recline the shoes.  I wonder why six cylinder shoes are plentiful but not eight cylinder.  I would have thought that there would be more eight cylinders on the road, but perhaps there was a large disparity in production numbers.  Ideally, I will try to find a used set and have them relined so that I can always have a spare set.  I am in the process of rebuilding all of the wheel cylinders and the master cylinder now... and replacing all of the non metal brake lines.  My very first step is to make the brake system perfect... then I will think about firing up the engine (as soon as I have a key made... lol).

 

Thanks so much for your recommendations!

 

Joe

You really should replace the metal brake lines, as well as the non-metal brake lines!  Rubbing against the frame and clips that hold them for 80plus years you can have pinholes and internal rust from moisture in the system.  Plus possible sludge inside as well.  Anything less on a car this old is not a complete job.

Edited by KURTRUK (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, Joe West said:

by the way... I have a question I cannot find the answer to. What are these little chrome balls for at the top of the dash?

 

I will guess.

Control valves for the vacuum wipers?

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On 5/25/2020 at 7:44 PM, KURTRUK said:

You really should replace the metal brake lines, as well as the non-metal brake lines!  Rubbing against the frame and clips that hold them for 80plus years you can have pinholes and internal rust from moisture in the system.  Plus possible sludge inside as well.  Anything less on a car this old is not a complete job.

 

Thanks!


All the metal lines were replaced sometime. They are pristine. 

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Today’s update.

 

I took a second pass at power spraying the undercarriage.  I got enough of the grime off with this pass that spraying the undercarriage with citrus cleaner should finish getting off all the grease and oil. I don’t think the undercarriage has ever been cleaned from the day it was new.

 

I also did a second pas on cleaning out the radiator and engine block.  This time, I pulled the engine petcock valve and stuck my power sprayer in the hole and pulled the trigger.  My pump is 4000 psi and 4.6gpm and you should have seen the rust that came out of that hole.  I sprayed and let it drain close to 15 times before the water finally ran clear.  Tomorrow I will fill the radiator with coolant and with any luck, drop the oil pan so I can see what’s going on there.

 

I’ll post some images tomorrow.

 

Joe

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Happiness is finding original chrysler material in a hidden area under the bottom of the front seat.  I stuck the vacuum cleaner in a crevice between sheet metal under the rear seat, and I heard the vacuum cleaner clog.  I pulled out the nozzle and found the material shown in the attached images.  Original material? 

 

Joe

B3453FCF-742B-4B75-AE78-7FC4023C9CD0.jpeg

FBA73198-0F9D-4186-A0FD-D1C7B1D371E3.jpeg

452493B7-5207-4D3F-B808-DA6835545E99.jpeg

7D6D456C-AC3C-43B9-AC43-1407B90C461A.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Steve9 said:

Go buy a lottery ticket, now! You’re on fire.

 

LOL.  I had no idea what to expect when I pulled the pan.  Since the car has only 48,000 miles on it, I was hoping it was relatively clean.

6 hours ago, c49er said:

You Might take a careful look at the connecting rod cotter pins for looseness or missing ends too.

They should not be loose and flopping around as the ends camera and fall off.

Such a wonderful car!

 

You are spot on.  When I pulled the pan, I found 7 cotter pin ends in the bottom (I used a magnet to search the bottom of the pan after I pulled it).  I am planning to replace all of the cotter pins and check the torque on the connecting rod ends.  Good idea?

10 hours ago, edinmass said:

Pistons look like they are new......👍

 

I just uploaded some more images showing the cam.  I think it is in pretty good shape as well.  By the way, the oil pan gasket had small string ties holding the pan gasket to the pan.  I think these ties are from the factory (see the attached image) since I do not believe that anyone has ever removed the pan from this engine.  Do you know if the factory tied the oil pan gaskets to the oil pan?

10 hours ago, zepher said:

There is far less sludge than I expected to see.  👍

I found quite a bit of lead (or at least I think it is lead since it is non-ferrous and the color seems to be correct) in the base of the pan (in addition to the cotter pin ends... lol) and some small metal filings that I removed with a magnet just to see how much metal there was in the base of the pan.  I cleaned the oil pickup in these images, but nothing else.

362543B0-F3FF-496E-97C6-48CA750A623A.jpeg

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Today’s update:

 

Oil pan is back on, NOS canister oil filter installed and engine filled with synthetic oil.  All rod bearings have had their torque verified and new cotter pins installed. I will add zinc to the oil to be on the safe side, even if it is a waste of money.  Battery charged and installed.  All lights tested and working.  Pulled all spark plugs and cranked engine... all seems well.  Tomorrow I will run a compression test, and on Monday I should be receiving my cap, rotor, points, and reproduction plug wires.  Locksmith comes tomorrow to create keys.  I will fill the fuel tank with fresh fuel and run the pump to purge the fuel lines tomorrow.

 

Fun day today.

 

Joe

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14 minutes ago, Joe West said:

Quick question. I notice that my water pump has a zerk fitting on it, and the factory maintenance manual calls out for a grease that no longer exists. What type of grease should I use?

Water pump grease (search forums, or a bearing house will have some).  I strongly recommend that you replace the zerk fitting with a grease cup, the turn-down kind, and put the zerk in ONLY for points judging.  The small grease gun used for water pumps in those days has a T handle at the end that you turn 90 or 180 degrees.  A lever handled grease gun or pistol type will blow the seals immediately because they deliver far more pressure than your seals can stand!

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Thanks so much!  I ordered from Amazon. 
 

Another question.  I measured compression on the engine and came up with the following results:

 

1. 82

2. 115

3. 120

4. 113

5. 111

6. 114

7. 120

8. 121

 

This engine has been sitting for the better part of 50 years, was stone cold during the compression test, all spark plugs were removed.  I am a bit worried about cylinder 1.   I will run a leakdown test, and assuming it is good, try squirting in some oil to test the rings.  I suspect the rings may be sticking and perhaps I should just run the motor for awhile and see if things settle down after a few hundred miles.  

 

That’s it for today.  I didn’t get much accomplished today on the Chrysler since I was taking pictures of the rest of the collection and uploading them to the forum post on the collection.

 

Joe

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