Fossil

Enclosed shipping

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

  I've noticed in some of these threads that there have been remarks about the cost of enclosed shipping.  I agree it can be hard to swallow but do most of the cars need to be shipped enclosed?  Guessing here but I'll bet that a lot of the vehicles being transported are going to be on the road at least occasionally anyway so why not have them shipped on an open trailer.  Expensive or Collector class vehicles for sure should be shipped enclosed but drivers probably not.  If damage did occur like a rock chip in the windshield it would be covered by the transporters insurance.

  Our 1930 DeSoto was shipped on a regular car trailer and arrived just fine.  I did visit with the driver when he was picking up the car and had him check a few things.  Are all four latches hooked on the hood?  He checked and none were.  Asked that it be loaded radiator towards the front and he did. Would he tie the doors handles together so the suicide doors don't come open and he did. Other than that it traveled just fine and arrived a day early. Price was $500 from KC Kansas to east central SD.  

  I know everyone has their own priorities but maybe shipping in the open would make a vehicle purchased easier to justify.

Edited by Fossil (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being abroad and having  always had cars shipped in enclosed containers for the sea journey , I have found the relative cost of open transport within the states more expensive  than container booked for whole trip to Cyprus or Uk 

i have bought cars from , Florida and Chicago , Los Angeles and Santa Monica. 

The florida to NJ was $450 ( open trailor) , but  the Chicago to NJ roughly the same ,but was in container all the way to Uk for extra cost of only $900 , west coast shipping recommended. Cars bought on east coast Los Angeles to coast port 3 in one container $400 , then all the way to Cyprus $2600, good value, compared to st Monica to coast port open trailer one car $350, then container to Cyprus $2000 , movements on east coast by American freight services .

although I always try to do the best deal possible, it seems combining overseas with internal US pretty good value , but within US pretty standard whether in container or not , but definitely cheaper for multiple loads . So personally I think good condition , valuable cars in container even if sharing with another car to cut cost is best option , project cars unless rare , cheapest quote 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had many vintage prewar 'Drivers'...... shipped open carrier...... it is alot cheaper and at the most you might get a few bugs splattered on it that have to be washed off... and making sure the hood is latched and doors secured is smart......     There is a web sigh,t that beats all the open carrier prices... it is called Uship... and what you do there is type in what vehicle, (not just vehicles), you want to ship.... if it runs and rolls or is in pieces, length and approximate weight...... where it is to be picked up and where delivered... then drivers and haulers from all over the nation... bid on what price they will charge you.... and you pick your hauler and you you get to talk to the driver (he gives you his cell number)... and it happens real quickly..... at very reasonable prices... many haulers don't want to travel on their return route,  with out a full load...  I have had several vehicles transported this way, at very low costs..... they are all insured and legal to haul....  Uship

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Recently a member here sent his car on an open trailer. While at a rest stop, someone opened the suicide door of his 1931 Cadillac. They didn't close it. Going down the road, the door flew open, then off the car ....100 percent gone. They never realized it happened too they stopped later on. But the guy DID save money on shipping his nicely restored driver by open carrier..........I delt with the insurance company on the claim for him, as he is a friend. It was ugly, since he didn't have one of the traditional old car companies. As for the trucker.......they didn't car, wasn't their problem. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's all good and you save money , until it isn't as Ed said.  Especially if the carrier hit inclement weather.  Hail storm, road debris even that 70 MPH trip with an early car in a heavy rain storm will let you definitely know where the water leaks are witj stained upholstery or a stained topped on an open car. 

I always use enclosed for any distance or inclement weather.  

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Open, sometimes, maybe. I'm expecting a newly purchased 1915 Model T touring coming from Indiana to Florida this Wednesday. It's a real nice barn find but I'm paying about $300 extra for enclosed shipping even though it's an inexpensive car. The cost is under $900 for the 1,250 mile ride.

A few years ago I hauled our '30 Model A sport coupe on the same route on an open trailer. In south Georgia we hit a horrendous thunder storm and the top was literally shredded. Yes, insurance covered a replacement top, but the time and aggravation wasn't covered.

My bottom line says if it's old and/or in any way fragile, send it enclosed. 

Edited by parrts (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, parrts said:

My bottom line says if it's old and/or in any way fragile, send it enclosed. 

I would totaly agree and don't think I would ship any soft top open carrier. It is too bad about the door coming open on the Cadillac and feared that happening to our car. That's why I asked the driver to secure them. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I tie ropes between the rear doors inside just to prevent people from trying to open them. On the passenger side, I use huge zip ties to secure that side. Thus the only door that will open is the driver door.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will echo everything Ed said. Open transport seems like a bargain until something happens that enclosed transport would have prevented. Then the few hundred bucks you saved will make you feel foolish.

 

I had a client ship a '30s Chrysler convertible sedan to us in the middle of winter. OPEN. The header bow on the top, which is of course made of wood, wasn't quite as stable as everyone thought. It stayed in place at 45-50 MPH speeds that the car would drive, but on the leading edge of an open trailer hammering down the highway at 75 MPH in a snow storm, well, it cracked and gave up. The top flipped up and back, flapping in the wind all the way from the east coast to our shop in Cleveland, about 350 miles. Again, in a snowstorm. The car arrived with the top in tatters, the top frame twisted beyond recognition, and the new leather interior filled with snow, slush, water, and salt, and the car behind it damaged by the top bashing against it for 350 miles. It was very nearly a total loss, as the cost to repair it was close to its value, and the repairs to the second car required a lawsuit to sort out. All to save $300 on the shipping.

 

I also had a 1957 Thunderbird show up on an open trailer and one of the fender skirts was missing. Nobody noticed until we did our usual check list on the incoming car, and even then it took three of us looking at it before anyone noticed. By then the truck was long gone and who knows when the skirt vanished? I suspect at a truck stop since there was no damage. It was just gone, removed, I assume, by a guy who owned a black '57 T-Bird and needed a right side fender skirt. Remarkably, original steel fender skirts are not cheap or easy to find and painting to match was another few hundred bucks.

 

I've compiled a small group of photos demonstrating how NOT to ship cars, maybe I'll share them someday when I know the people involved won't be angry at me for calling them morons.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In October 2019 I paid to have transported open air from Midwest to Northern California a 1934 Nash.  The top frame was delivered with a bent as though the transport company had a 25 foot giant karate chop the top leaving a big dent.   Lucky for me there were photos taken before and after delivery that showed the damage was done during transportation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Fossil said:

  If damage did occur like a rock chip in the windshield it would be covered by the transporters insurance.

Have you ever tried to to collect from a transporter's insurer on a claim?  No amount of money could be for the aggravation involved in trying to do so, IMHO.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, D Yaros said:

Have you ever tried to to collect from a transporter's insurer on a claim? 

 

No I haven't and just figured it would be straight forward. From what your inferring that might not be the case. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I will echo everything Ed said. Open transport seems like a bargain until something happens that enclosed transport would have prevented. Then the few hundred bucks you saved will make you feel foolish.

 

I had a client ship a '30s Chrysler convertible sedan to us in the middle of winter. OPEN. The header bow on the top, which is of course made of wood, wasn't quite as stable as everyone thought. It stayed in place at 45-50 MPH speeds that the car would drive, but on the leading edge of an open trailer hammering down the highway at 75 MPH in a snow storm, well, it cracked and gave up. The top flipped up and back, flapping in the wind all the way from the east coast to our shop in Cleveland, about 350 miles. Again, in a snowstorm. The car arrived with the top in tatters, the top frame twisted beyond recognition, and the new leather interior filled with snow, slush, water, and salt, and the car behind it damaged by the top bashing against it for 350 miles. It was very nearly a total loss, as the cost to repair it was close to its value, and the repairs to the second car required a lawsuit to sort out. All to save $300 on the shipping.

 

I also had a 1957 Thunderbird show up on an open trailer and one of the fender skirts was missing. Nobody noticed until we did our usual check list on the incoming car, and even then it took three of us looking at it before anyone noticed. By then the truck was long gone and who knows when the skirt vanished? I suspect at a truck stop since there was no damage. It was just gone, removed, I assume, by a guy who owned a black '57 T-Bird and needed a right side fender skirt. Remarkably, original steel fender skirts are not cheap or easy to find and painting to match was another few hundred bucks.

 

I've compiled a small group of photos demonstrating how NOT to ship cars, maybe I'll share them someday when I know the people involved won't be angry at me for calling them morons.

 

 

@Matt Harwood

Even if not the photos themselves, I think shipping guidelines based on your experiences would benefit the lot of us.  I’ve shipped twice, east to west in enclosed transport.  My experience was positive.  It was expensive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, shop for price! Call the individual big name companies, I've hit them with a truck in the area of the car and going my way for a big discount. Ask for a discount, senior, first time doing business with the company, it may not be a huge discount but it's a discount.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

With respect, I would disagree that shopping for the cheapest price is the way to go when shipping a car. There are thousands of brokers on the internet who make it sound like they own the trucks and move the cars, and they'll give you a great price. But what they're really doing is putting an offer on Central Dispatch that's about 50% of what they told you, and hoping that some trucker with crappy equipment is desperate enough to take it. It could be weeks or months before anyone does, but in the meantime, that broker ran your credit card and collected his fee. He doesn't care if the truck ever shows up and if you call to complain, he has no problem ignoring you. 

 

Pay for a reputable shipper and pay them their going rate. You'll get better service than the guy who chisels them and begs for a few pennies discount. The guy booking the car will say to the driver, "Yeah, take your time. This guy only cares about cheap. Nah, don't bother taking any extra care with his piece of crap car, he's getting a discount. That's enough."

 

You get what you pay for in automobile shipping. And if you care about your car not being farked up when it arrives, pay the going rate to have someone with a good reputation, good equipment, and good insurance (as well as a good attitude) do it. I pay the going rate, even though I ship 150 cars a year. My broker takes good care of me. The trucks show up on time. The drivers speak English (not that I'm anti-immigrant, but if the guy doesn't speak English, well, I'm going to have a hard time teaching him how to start and operate a 1917 Packard, aren't I?). The trucks are in good working order. The cars are delivered on time. And to date, we have had a 0.0% damage rate over the course of more than 10 years.

 

The guys who hire their own shippers and think only about the discount? They get crap like this:

 

IMG_20140205_143337_454.thumb.jpg.0e9bff277b4acdbce34c901970376466.jpg  IMG_20150612_084102307.thumb.jpg.36809e732c8858201aa581bbd5670ef2.jpg

 

733874887_2019-11-1913_59_18.thumb.jpg.70f6239e62486af0d155d087bc0adc07.jpg  1781009510_2019-11-1914_13_17.thumb.jpg.8a8478058b7902a29bb3cfe15e58f55c.jpg

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You get what you pay for. If you needed heart surgery you can get it cheaper in mexico or china... I have called customers and said your car should not be on this truck. A few listened to me. A few did not. But when a car shows up missing parts and needing a paint job you will be glad you spent a little more.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend had a Packard sedan sent to my house by a broker trucker outfit. When the truck showed up it was the worst looking old dirty, smoking K-Wapper  you ever saw. The name on the side was  "Three Amigo Trucking" Only 2 boys go  out of the cab and I smartly said - " Where is the third amigo? " They said he is sleeping. I didn't think anything of it again until the car was let down from the TOP with a long rope with three wraps around a cross member  to control  the speed of decent and sure enough the third boy got out of the back of the Packard scratching his ass and rubbing his eyes with his standing on end!!! I was shocked as he was on the top of the trailer. I asked him why he chose my car and he replied" It has the best interior of all the others" He didn't hurt it any so no harm done.  

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve called buyers too, telling them that the transport wasn’t appropriate.  Never been listened to.  1902 Olds on an open trailer, 1911 Hupmobile on a rollback, sheesh...

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

replying if only to echo what has already been said...one additional comment about U-ship - many many of the shippers do NOT have commercial insurance.  Need I say more?

If you care about your car, pay a professional, insured, reputable, etc...

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I ever had a car shipped I worried about cost and used the open trailer shipper recommended by the seller. The car arrived with all the top surfaces covered with oil and a thick layer of mixed in dirt. Luckily it was a hardtop car and could be cleaned. From that point on I have bit the bullet and paid for enclosed shipping without any other issues - well worth the price.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A local club member bought a Model A Ford and had it hauled open. It showed up with a torn top and no hood. The driver was "really sorry". That was about all the English he could speak. But hey cheaper is always better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To say this has been educational would be an understatement. Thank you for the education. Sounds like I was pretty lucky and got a good driver. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/18/2020 at 8:12 PM, SparkEE said:

@Matt Harwood

Even if not the photos themselves, I think shipping guidelines based on your experiences would benefit the lot of us.  I’ve shipped twice, east to west in enclosed transport.  My experience was positive.  It was expensive.

 

 

It wasn't expensive......you got what you paid for.........and trust me, it's worth every penny!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....and, coincidently, I was behind this transport heading to the Interstate, drizzly rainy day....not good on a car at all.....

222155D3-21B9-44E3-862B-B8A7D132CC69.jpeg

EB512789-D8DD-4380-8CC4-8F246E8B1651.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend painstakingly restored a '39 Packard V12 7-passenger limo. A few years later he sold it, and the buyer arranged shipping (I don't know with what carrier). The Packard was loaded on bottom in a stacker trailer. When the car reached its destination, the steel top had been crushed down to the level of the seat backs when the trailer ramps above had given way. I heard that as for liability, the buyer had not yet insured the car; the seller's insurance lapsed when the seller turned the car over to the transport company; and the transport company's insurance was reportedly refusing to pay. I don't know how it turned out.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now