Recommended Posts

In order to clean and lap the valves on this 1914 engine I need to remove these caps. There must have been a common tool for this purpose. Can anyone share a picture of one or let me know what it is called?

IMG_7222.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to say I've seen some that were supplied in the car's tool kit.  Not sure there was a generic common tool as there are a lot of variations of those caps.  I've found the easy way to go about it with that particular style is to get a piece of well-fitting keystock, lay it across both slots, and tap with a dead blow hammer.  The slots look nice and square so it shouldn't booger it up if you strike it correctly.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't specify what the dimensions of the cap's are, but if you go to the McMaster-Carr website search "spanner wrenches" (for example 5471A11 or 6975A14) one is adjustable the other isn't. As you can see they come in a variety of sizes and probably came with the car when it was new.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also get creative and find an old 1/2" drive socket, about the size of the cap and grind away everything except the four lugs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are called "valve cages".  Lots of discussion on the pre war Buick page.  Do a search.  Here is one example.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Tinindian said:

They are called "valve cages".  Lots of discussion on the pre war Buick page.  Do a search.  Here is one example.  

 

 

 

In a case like this it's not a valve cage when the valves are en bloc.  It's just a plug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Model A Ford parts vendors sell a hook wrench for adjusting the water pump packing nut.  It's only a couple bucks but it might not be big/heavy enough for your valve cages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As previously stated, any flat stock that fits well will do the job. I have never had an issue getting one off (a tire iron works great) but have put some work into getting them tightened enough to not leak... this is where a proper fitting piece of stock really helps.  Most are designed for a crush gasket that you won’t have new of, some are just iron on iron. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Olson's Gaskets is your best bet for the crush gaskets.  They are good about hoarding up old stock where they can get them as most sizes are not available new  I think you could go with annealed solid copper if it came down to it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, W_Higgins said:

Olson's Gaskets is your best bet for the crush gaskets.  They are good about hoarding up old stock where they can get them as most sizes are not available new  I think you could go with annealed solid copper if it came down to it. 

Interesting I did not know there was supposed to be a gasket there, more research to do.

 

Incidentilaly the engine I am working on is a Chandler and Williams made the wrenches that Chandler recommended to its customers. I am looking at buying a Williams #471 adjustable spanner wrench (3/4" to 2") as the diameter is 2". 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leaving Maine 2 years ago I had a wrench for one of those cages that I think went to a friends shop. He kept telling me it was a bung wrench but I am pretty sure it was for your style cages. I will try to get ahold of him to see if he can find it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, W_Higgins said:

Olson's Gaskets is your best bet for the crush gaskets.  They are good about hoarding up old stock where they can get them as most sizes are not available new  I think you could go with annealed solid copper if it came down to it. 

Thanks email sent to Olson's for the crush gaskets which my parts manual says I need 12 of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suspect it would be easy for Iam to make one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. Good advice above. I have an original for my 1915 C-36 Buick. Dandy Dave! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now