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bloodowl89

Looking for answers about obtaining a title.

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Posted (edited)

A while back I posted about my grandfather owning some vehicles that were not on file with the DMV registration-wise. I am trying to obtain titles for the vehicles and found out today that I can't get a bonded title for them because they are older than 25 years, unless I misread that. The current situation I'm going with is that I only have a bill of sale for the vehicles but never received a title and that they sat there for a good while. These are vehicles that would need to be restored and no one has any interest in them except me it would seem. I know they are not hot, or stolen. Could anyone point me in the right direction assuming that I have a bill of sale for the vehicles and am looking obtain a clean title for them or anything really showing that I am the rightful owner of the vehicles? Ultimately I am looking, or hoping, to have titles for them, and to restore them. Any further info I will be more than happy to provide, if needed. Thanks for all the help/advice. 

Edited by bloodowl89 (see edit history)

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

The titles are off the serial number.. Not sure what years you are looking at...

 

Some are off the block number. Some are off the door number. But you have to look up the car vendor. Some stamp it on the frame or a car part on the car..  or both..

 

The sad thing is the DMV in each state all have different rules.. 

 

 

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You need to specify what state, as they are all different. A few are easy. A few are basically impossible. Most are some where in between. But you need advice from someone familiar with YOUR state.

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I remember you started a few different threads on these and then on a later Oldsmobile. You need to go where you will end up having to get the titles - walk into a rural DMV office and look around for an old timer -- then go explain the situation (you don't need to give your name) and ask what the best way to proceed is.  Or you can go to a local attorney who may have an in at the local DMV or know a friendly judge...  no idea what the fee is but here in rural NY it ran around $700 o $800 a decade or two ago depending on how many favors were being called in.

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Some states don't issue titles for cars over a certain year. They only issue a bill of sale. That is an accepted practice in that state. Getting other states to understand that can sometimes be a problem, sometimes not. Most states also have a process for getting a title for an abandoned car. You have to actually spend time reading the regulations that apply to your state - and since we don't know what state you live in, comments about what other states do are worthless. Asking for opinions on the interwebs is a great way to get erroneous information. Go to your local DMV website or state police website (whichever is responsible where you live) and READ the laws. Do not rely on the DMV employees to know the  more obscure parts of registration law.  Especially do not expect the internet gurus to know it.

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I'm so sorry for leaving out that extremely crucial piece of information. I live in Florida and the vehicles were last registered in Florida. Hope this helps me find the answers. Thank you all for your input.

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If you have the VIN, first check hereMuch information and for free.

 

If a Florida bill of sale it should have the identification number on it.

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found out today that I can't get a bonded title for them because they are older than 25 years, unless I misread that.

Your insurance agent issues the bond.

The states require the bond in case someone appears and says I own the car, my insurance agent never seen this happen.

Contact your dmv and follow the Florida procedure.

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The first thing I would do is go to your local Florida DMV and present all your documentation and see what they say. I know in New York it's almost impossible without ton's of documentation, good luck and a sympathetic DMV agent.

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Hire a titling agent, that is what I do.  They know all the rules for your state, and handle it all for a fee.  Totally worth it, especially here in CA with all our wacky regulations.

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Having been born in, and lived in Florida most of my life, I have to agree that Vermont Boy's advice about seeking out a "rural DMV" is good advice.  I lived for many years in the Dade County (Miami) area, and I can tell you from experience, that involvement with that local DMV was anything but pleasant.  I'm now in Lake County, and have found the local DMV experience to be a relative breath of fresh air.  Before contacting your local DMV, you should study the applicable Florida Statutes as linked by Joe Padavano above.  The site linked by Padgett for checking VINs is also very useful.  Unlike some states, I think that, in Florida, you'll be able to get your titles without too much trouble ... unless there are some unusual circumstances regarding your vehicles.

 

Good luck, and let us know how it works out.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Might be easier to ignore the "Bill of Sale" altogether, and instead just tell the DMV that you have owned the car all along, but have lost your title.

 

That's how it would work in California, you would sign a statement saying you lost your title and they'd get you a replacement. That is with the understanding it would have dropped out of their computer system, which it would have.

 

On the other hand, if I went in and said I bought a car without a title and just have a bill of sale, then the DMV would make me go back to the previous owner and make that person fill out paperwork. So it'd be easier to just claim it was mine all along and I lost the title.

 

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Regulations have a way of impeding things an honest person wants to do, always designed for the worst case. I have heard of people with similar problems who went to the seedy side of town where the second rate car lots are, looked for a lot that had an oldie in the line or out back, and after a friendly talk, had their problem solved for a hundred or two.

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Posted (edited)

An impound guy could make a claim for towing or storage.

Maybe a deal could be made along those lines.

 

However I totally avoid title issues any more. I could be dead by the time things came through for me.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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I think this is a hobby within the Hobby, it just never ends so glad I live in Connecticut. 

 

 

Bob 

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2 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Might be easier to ignore the "Bill of Sale" altogether, and instead just tell the DMV that you have owned the car all along, but have lost your title.

I was going to mention this. It may be the easiest way to get a title. And it's totally legitimate.

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If I told them I owned the vehicle and lost the title and they did a new one, wouldn't that still come back as his titles and then I'd have to have him sign them to me? That wouldn't be possible though since he is deceased. The local DMV is wanting me to contact legal services and go before a judge to try to have them court appointed if I have bill of sale and present any documentation I have. 

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55 minutes ago, bloodowl89 said:

If I told them I owned the vehicle and lost the title and they did a new one, wouldn't that still come back as his titles and then I'd have to have him sign them to me?

 

 

I believe you are correct. Not only that, even if the original owner were still alive, my guess is the DMV wouldn't follow through on your request to get copies made once they found out you weren't the owner listed on the title.

 

I'm surprised more people on AACA and other forums don't bring up the service that this company sells, which costs way under $100:

 

https://www.cartitles.com/title-option-2/

 

Either the process doesn't work as smoothly as the company claims, or some states have closed the loophole that Vermont title registration creates. Definitely worth checking out, though. (I haven't used the service, so I can't verify it does or doesn't work.)

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4 hours ago, bloodowl89 said:

If I told them I owned the vehicle and lost the title and they did a new one, wouldn't that still come back as his titles and then I'd have to have him sign them to me? That wouldn't be possible though since he is deceased. The local DMV is wanting me to contact legal services and go before a judge to try to have them court appointed if I have bill of sale and present any documentation I have. 

Probate will work.. You pay for the court costs and the lawyer no one show up and they give the cars to you... My estate did this in probate and they gave me a car I already owned..  

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5 hours ago, bloodowl89 said:

If I told them I owned the vehicle and lost the title and they did a new one, wouldn't that still come back as his titles and then I'd have to have him sign them to me? That wouldn't be possible though since he is deceased. The local DMV is wanting me to contact legal services and go before a judge to try to have them court appointed if I have bill of sale and present any documentation I have. 

 

I would not say that you have owned them all along, because they have been in the family?  If I have read your posts correctly, the cars have been in the family for decades and as part of the estate they were given to you.  If you have any old family pictures of the car, I would take them with you to show the family connection. That along with any old registrations, estate documents, and other documents that you can possibly find.  Be sure to search the vehicles really well.  You might find some old documents stuffed under seats, in door pockets, etc..   Good luck on your quest.

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The land they are on does not belong to me. I am trying to pull them from that land and on to land that I do own. I am assuming the only way to do this is by court order but my main focus is on getting the vehicles here first  That has become a pain in the you know what since even trying. I have some help now and all I need to do is make sure I can rent the truck and trailer. I might even be able to borrow someone's truck to get the cost of this down lower. Once those vehicles are here it opens a few more options and I can worry about the titles later. I just wanted to look into it for the sake of having a plan ahead of time. I have plans to restore the vehicles if possible. Especially the '63 Chevy C-10 and the '72 Dodge Dart Custom. If there is anything you all would like to add, feel free to and thanks again.

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Heck yea, get them to your own place.

Isn't possession still 90% ?

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Posted (edited)

The cars were in the possession of someone else who is now deceased,  they were not in his name, they are on someone else's property. They are new enough that they were titled to someone which ownership is likely bound by an estate, those VIN numbers are registered to the previous owner. The property owner is not sounding willing to have them removed.

 

I'd say the possibility of getting a clear title to these vehicles is slim to none, and even if successful, it's going to be expensive (to do it the legal way). I would definitely get a clear title before investing one dollar in them. The bill of sale can help, but if it wasn't notarized..

 

-Ron

Edited by Locomobile (see edit history)

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22 hours ago, JACK M said:

An impound guy could make a claim for towing or storage.

Maybe a deal could be made along those lines.

 

Again, it depends on the specific state. Here in VA, there is a process for acquiring title to a car based on a lien such as a mechanic's lien or storage lien. I have no idea if Florida has the same process, but as I've said a couple of times, read the laws that apply.

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