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Posted (edited)

I was looking at this old frame that has been laying in my pasture all my life hard telling how long before. I was going to junk it then noticed the hub caps were still in good shape. I know nothing about this car or how to restore one so this was the only site I could find anything on it if anyone is interested I will be happy to help them out. The frame is a Crow Elk-Hart

682E1469-6CBA-4C0C-B632-E268539F6048.jpeg

Edited by Hammranch
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I'm sure you'll get responses soon, but more photos of the frame and any parts left would also be helpful.  Right now, there are probably some hub-cap collectors looking-

Terry

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Just now, Terry Bond said:

I'm sure you'll get responses soon, but more photos of the frame and any parts left would also be helpful.  Right now, there are probably some hub-cap collectors looking-

Terry

I have more pics but it won’t let me add any more can you help me how to do that?

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Posted (edited)
 

The Crow Elkhart Automobile & Crow-Elkhart Motor Car Co.

 

 

 

Crow Elkhart
Crow-Elkhart Motor Car Co.
Elkhart, IN
1909-1924

The founders of this early American Automobile manufacturer were Dr. L.C. Crow and his son Martin Crow. The Crow-Elkhart automobile was produced in Elkhart, Indiana from 1909 to 1924. The Crow-Elkhart’s were some of the first self starters. The first automobile produced was a 5 passenger touring car. As you can see in the magazine ad below this car sold for $935.00 in 1918.

In addition to the touring car, Crow Elkhart produced a 3 passenger convertible coupe, 5 passenger sedan. Deluxe models included a 5 passenger touring and a small 4 passenger deluxe clover leaf body. See all the 1918 Crow-Elkhart models below.


1918 Crow Elkhart Advertising
1918 Crow Elkhart Advertising

Crow-Elkhart’s motor cars were powered by Rutenber, Lycoming, Herschell-Spillman, Gray and Atlas proprietary engines. The first being a 30 horsepower Herschell-Spillman. 1918 engine specifications include a 4 cylinder with a Zenith carburetor, Connecticut ignition and Dyneto self starting motor and lighting.
 
Edited by ALF1920 (see edit history)
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You may need to resize the photos. If you go to the discussion topic catagory, right near the top is a topic on "How to use this forum."  Under that you'll find the topic on how to post photos.

Terry

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1 minute ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

The software, I understand, now automatically

resizes pictures.

Wasn't aware that was happening or even possible?

Terry

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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Is the forum software limiting his postings

or attachments because he is a newcomer?

The software, I understand, now automatically

resizes pictures.

 

Let's hope that is true, we'll never knew who we lost trying to be helpful but gave up jumping through hoops trying to post a simple photo. Bob 

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Such a rare automobile! And the frame looks to be in nice shape. Someone should make an effort to collect all the pieces that may be scattered around there. Doubtful one could get enough of the missing parts to complete a car, but would be worth the effort. A lot of the major missing parts (rear end, front axle, etc) were likely sourced from suppliers that were used by other marques. Suitably proper replacements may be available.

Rarity here is a double edged sword. "Rare" sometimes means "valuable". However "rare" is only half the equation. "Desirable" is the other half of that equation. And with so few people having any significant amount of a Crow-Elkhart, there basically isn't any demand for bulky parts. However "valuable" isn't always about money! Crow-Elkharts are fairly well known, and a few do exist. Surviving examples however are rarely seen or driven. History IS important! Human beings are clearly defective in that we cannot see clearly into the future. Knowing and appreciating our past is the best way we have to understand what we are doing and how it will affect us in the future! Preserving our antique automobiles, music, movies, literature, architecture, and so many other things helps us to connect with, and understand our past. And that helps us to understand where we are going.

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Someone will certainly want it. My guess is that frame will never be a car again but there are large parts collections where relics like this go to wait for their next life. It is possible that the axles are restorable and with hubs it could end up a project.  Allowing a buyer to bring a shovel would be a good idea. 
 

If looking to make it disappear, post an ad in the cars for sale section. I would price it around 500 bucks, or just enough money to keep it together. It is possible that more money could be had but not enough to justify putting a ton of your time into squeezing a few hundred more dollars.

 

thanks for posting and please help it get to someone that will save it... you will make a little bit of money along the way. 

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