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Corvair Cylinder Head Temperature Gauge


Duff71Riv
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I have a 1965 corvair monza that doesn't have a temp gauge. I'm driving it more frequently now and would really like to add one to my car, but I'm not sure what type to buy. I've seen CHT senders in the probe style that go into the block (like a water temp sensor) but I'm not sure those would work or not in my corvair (do corvair engines have fittings on the block that would accommodate these?) I've also seen motorcycles with CHT gauges run off the spark plug (which I would prefer to do)   Has anyone here installed an aftermarket CHT gauge in their corvair or vw? Help or product suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very much!

Ryan 

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Help is easy. Post this on corvaircenter.com/phorum    !   Several threads about aftermarket gauges on there. 

 

Spark plug type is easy to install. Drilling a head is not recommended.

 

Of course there is always the Corsa dash with factory thermistor system, but that would be a deduction in AACA judging...😁

 

And now, there is an aftermarket system that will fit in the existing holes in the head (not sure if 140/180 or the other engines [different hole size and depth]).

 

http://corvaircenter.com/phorum/read.php?1,1069608,1069785#msg-1069785

 

Log on there and ask away, lots of good people answering Corvair questions.👍

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Oooh, already asked and answers are given on Corvair Center forum!😉

 

http://corvaircenter.com/phorum/read.php?1,1073464

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)
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I'm  bouncing ideas off both forums. Could i order that gauge with that sender type? Where would the two end connection attach up to? I'd assume the two copper studs sticking out of the back of the gauge? Thank you for the information, greatly appreciate it! 

Ryan 

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1 minute ago, padgett said:

 

My rationale was that there are temperature operated blocking ducts on each side. If one sticks, that head will spike and the other won't.

Interesting I didn't know corvairs had these. Where are they located? is there a way to have them permanently open?  

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thanks for the flashback to my corvair days. those thermoststats  pictured earlier are very important to keep an eye on to make sure they are working properly. after an evening of having a few drinks, i must have backed into a curb, and bent the left one.funnt thing about corvairs, if they get hot, and blow a head gasket, you don't notice it rightaway. no low coolant, no steam out the exhaust. those gauges seem like a good idea.

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16 minutes ago, padgett said:

Is a rectangular pivoted opening facing back and under each head. Many disappeared.

 

 

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Thank you for the visual! Mine didn't have those when I bought them so i will run one gauge to the back right cylinder (assuming its the hottest because least air and proximity to the exhaust though I very well could be wrong) 

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Hmm, 

53 minutes ago, Duff71Riv said:

Thank you for the visual! Mine didn't have those when I bought them so i will run one gauge to the back right cylinder (assuming its the hottest because least air and proximity to the exhaust though I very well could be wrong) 

 

OK, I think you mean front right cylinder. I do that front rear confusion all the time, and I have owned at least one since 1976. Just like the REAR main seal is the one at the harmonic balancer (164 cu in) and the arrows on the pistons point to the flywheel end of the engine, the FRONT.

 

The exhaust has nothing to do with head temperature here. The main issue is the "fresh air" hose off the Turkey Roaster (top shroud) right at cylinder #5. Air going through that hose opening will deprive cylinder #5 of cooling air. Recommend making a plate of thin metal in the shape of the hose adapter and blank off that hole. You can leave the hose in place, or remove it, but then you have to cap the other end of the hose.... Note, late model turbos and AC cars have that hose exiting from the middle or so of the top shroud. Just keep those fresh air hoses in good shape, as that hose adapter is pop riveted onto the top shroud.

 

As to missing bottom shrouds and thermostat doors, that happens where it was driven in the summer. Back in the 80s with the first gasoline changes, 110 HP Powerglide Corvairs pinged bad in the summer temperatures around here. Right at the upshift point. Easy cure was remove bottom shrouds. You could set timing back, but performance suffered. 😉  Some owners still do a seasonal change of shrouds. A small sheet metal screw and washer replace that long ago broken tab holding the door pin in place....😄  Of course, screw placement is critical, as to not screw the door in place....😲

 

Factory snap switch for temperature light is under #1 cylinder. Factory thermister for gauge on turbo and Corsa models is under #6 cylinder (same hole on head, just depends on what side of engine it is installed). Hole is threaded with coarse threads on all except turbo and 140 heads, which are fine thread. The snap switch is different set point too.

 

 

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3 hours ago, padgett said:

Had a pair in my Monza, one for each head.

 

 

dashcht3.jpg

 

As gauges go, that's very cool looking (no temperature pun intended.) I love the dual needles with the overlapping sweep. Never seen anything like it in a car before.

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Gauge was really for a Rotax in a light aircraft. Just happened to be the right size. Also had a mechanical oil pressure gauge on the engine, had to open the engine cover to check but dash light was functional (off at about 6 psi)

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