Jump to content

1932 series 96S gas tank either clean or find new ?


Recommended Posts

Hello all 

well I have decided to tackle the gas tank and looks like it's been a while since any care as there is obvious sludge and build up in the tank, I also noticed underneath it was hit at some point and appears a little soft in one area not to mention that it is pretty rusty.  I am going to drop and inspect!  if it is not worth the effort is there anyone out there with either a used or knows were to purchase a brand knew replacement tank?   I plan on driving the car as much as possible and am leaning toward new tank.  20 bucks for Muriatic Acid or 300 for new tank?  Just curious if anyone knows of any out there, I heard I can use one off a series 80 as well 22 gallon.  let me know if anyone has any leads or thoughts.

 

Thank you for listening 
Matthew Maya 96S

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest also getting an estimate from Don Hart to restore your tank.  There may be other gas tank restoration companies out there as well.  It is just another option.  Any tank you find will need to be gone thru.  My baffles were laying in the tank and they opened one end, rewelded them, resealed  the tank and then coated it.   Hugh

https://www.donhart.com/fuel-tanks/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gas Tank Renu. Worth every penny, don't bother trying to do it yourself. Lifetime guarantee. No more problems, now or in the future. I use them for the tanks on all my personal cars and quite a few cars we've sold. Just no hassles.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a tank  on my 35-58 Buick that was unusable.   The bottom was full of small holes from corrosion.      No factory tanks available.   A custom tank is expensive. (Fitting it  to the old mounts would be a problem).  The  company called "Re-Nue" takes your old tank and cleans it up totally  repairs and coats it inside and outside.     This way I got a perfectly fitting,  like new gas tank.    My 35-58 tank  had a strange outlet piping and it had a "normal" flange (on top)  to mount a level indicating  unit.    I got a modern (?) normal float unit that included a top outlet pipe.   I got it from "Bob's" as  I wanted a top outlet for both level and fuel.    I got a  '39 - 56' fuel  sender.    He also has a '32 - 38' unit.    I then installed a fuel boost pump / filter next to the outlet of the tank.  I mounted it lower - near the bottom level of the tank to provide 'flooded suction' for the pump.   ( I'm an old pump guy) .    I don't like running a pump "dry" while getting it to prime.    I got a new "Airtex" 6 volt pump that has a very fine attached filter  - (p/n  E8011)  from 'Walmart' (good pricing and close delivery).  Then I got a separate pre-filter  from my local auto parts store.    Its a large (~1-1/4" dia.)  plastic filter (so you can see in it) .    This assembly will give you clean gas to run to your carb.    BTW,  if your going 12 volts,  the boost pump is an Airtex  p/n  E8016.     

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt has it right.   Its one of those items you want done right the first time.   BTW,  if you did not like having a plastic see thru pre-filter, get an all metal filter.    

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey thanks for the input I found a Re-new dealer about two hours from my house and will be calling for estimate.  Thank you for the input I do appreciate it.

Thanks

Matthew Maya

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it cost me ~$500 and one weeks time to re-new my tank.      Then the fun of getting it back in.   But a happy feeling to know it was like new and not cause any future problems for another 80+ years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a short comment. Re-new has been around a long time, and has serviced thousands of tanks, with many, many happy customers. As a professional mechanic and collection manager, I consider it an incorrect repair method. No gas tank should ever have a repair of any kind. That being said, if the bottom of the tank is soft and punky, a correct repair is first a new tank, seconed a good used one with no repairs. After that, every service and repair on a tank is a compromise. Back when I was young, I would ofter remove the bottom half of a tank, and weld in an entire new piece that looks correct with all dimples, flanges, and fittings. Then I would seal it and run it. I only did it as I had zero other options. Today, I have the ability to fabricate a tank in house, and thats what we do on EVERY car we restore. That said, it's asininely expensive, difficult, and takes a long time. Just be sure if you send it out, that it is structurally sound....like new. Sealing a tank with a soft area or hole and it becomes fuel tight is NOT a safe option. I do NOT know the process Re-new uses for any aspect of their service. I would find out how and what they do ahead of time before I removed the tank, or sent it to them. I also don't know if they would service a tank that you have welded in a patch.......so ask lots of what if questions so you understand every possible good and bad road the tank repair may take. From 40 years of doing this, is see many unsafe repaired tanks, and have seen several disasters because of them. Work smart, stay safe, and be sure to drain all the fuel from the tank before removal. Drop dry ice in the tank to displace fumes, or flood it with CO2. Best, Ed

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ed,

I will take every option into consideration, I like the idea of removing the bottom and redoing.  I have a neighbor who welds and works on a lot of farm equipment fabrication, I am going to bring it down to him and see what he might do.  As everyone has seen the posting of the heat riser you will get a sense of what the car is, and how far it would take with both time and especially money to fully restore.  I am but a small town middle of the road auto collector, I feel I've been lucky to find some of the vehicles I have and to be able to drive.  I will be keeping it pretty much the way it is and make sure it is sound to drive as that is the intention.  I like the idea of removing the bottom and putting new pan, as no one will be judging this vehicle with out a tetanus shot.  That said I will not rat rod it or anything like that it will just be what it is in a state of found preserved.

 

Thanks

Matthew Maya

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My 1929 Master tank was full of rust . The bottom looked like swiss cheese. A ReNu dealer sectioned in a new floor and sealed it. This was almost 10 years ago. Still great. Lifetime warranty AND didn't have to worry with fitment of a newly fabricated tank

Link to post
Share on other sites

The tank on my 32 -58 was in terrible shape.  I sent the tank to Rock Valley and they built a new stainless steel tank with the original filler, vent and sending unit components from my original tank.  That was 15 years ago and cost $350 at that time.  No coatings on the interior to fail, no corrosion with the SS.  

 

Bob Engle

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had my tank boiled out and stripped in a turco tank, small patch and sealed professionally for $250.00,  While the tanks out think about if youre going to use a different sending unit such as a capacitance type, might need to make a new hole or modify the orig. Vans metal smith machine will make you a stainless baffled tank for $1200.00 here in Seattle.  Whats in your wallet?

Friends here have used a por 15 type tank sealer with good results but it all depends on your tanks condition.. remember you're driving a wooden framed car,  !!!

Steve 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Hello all 

Well I got lucky the tank was in pretty good shape and the baking soda and white vinegar flush took a lot of the crap out, flushed out several times reintroduced gas she is holding.  Left the dent but did paint black I’ll put in this weekend on to the next.  Thank you for all the ideas I will have more questions I’m sure.

 

Thanks

Matt

F5DA795B-A384-47C1-966D-D97C02C0A4F1.jpeg

90AB2010-0AD5-416B-A686-B8EF8C26786A.jpeg

97BB0547-2875-403C-A8A0-157705788F7E.jpeg

261A8137-EAFE-4C9B-9014-D3F2BE94610B.jpeg

B8B331EF-C11D-4DB9-9151-7FF61269BB5B.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...