JJorgensen52

What would you do? Considering selling my Buick project

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Keep it.  You need to change the plans for the car and start putting it back together,  doing restoration, improvements as you can.  You will need stress relief in the upcoming years and putting this car back together can give that to you.  As you put it back together you will see small steps of accomplishments rather than a huge unfinished projects staring at you.  Plan each of your mini projects around what can be done in 2 hours, 4 hours or what ever you have time for.  Focus on the small steps and you will get it done.  It may not be the car that you dreamed of when you started, but it will be one you can enjoy with your family cruising until you sell it for something else.  it will be easier to sell all together as well as the satifaction you will get putting it back together.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, MrEarl said:

If this is your only Buick, no question, keep it!  You’ll forever regret selling it if you do. Ask me how I know, no wait please don’t. But definitely do not buy another thinking “I’ll just buy this to drive while restoring the Wildcat” that can lead to a barn and pasture full of Buicks! Jus take my word for it. 
seriously I can tell by the parts you’ve gathered and the length of time and times you’ve already moved it l, you love the car. Keep it and maybe not do the frame off , unless it’s too late to reconsider, but do  hop up the engine a bit and hell yea, throw that T10 in it and burn some rubber. 
btw @JJorgensen52  what branch of military you in? 

 

6 hours ago, MrEarl said:

One more question James,  where do the '50 GMC 100 Shortbed - '69 Chevrolet K10 Shortbed Stepside - '71 Chevrolet C10 Longbed Fleetside play into this decision.

 

@MrEarl, first question first - Coast Guard, going on 10 years next month.

 

Now, regards to cars - as you can see, I too have a bit of a fleet of vehicles (there are a few others not on that list) some from before the Wildcat and some after. With the exception of the '50 GMC (which I am building, albeit slowly, for my parents) and the '69 K10 (my first classic; so rusty from being used as a driver that it's probably only good for scrap, but I may yet try to save it as it is a rare one), all are running, driving rigs I use semi-regularly. My wife is supportive of my hobby and I do get a naptime here or an evening there, so I have some time to keep plugging away.

 

I asked this question because I have been debating with myself; you all have shared all of the options I was considering, plus some more besides, and a lot of interesting reasoning which I hadn't explored before.

 

As several stated, it's costing me nothing to store and is protected from further damage, so I have no heartache there. Some days, when one of the other cars needs to be tinkered with I'd love to have that space, but the weather is kind here at my current station so working outdoors is very viable. I do, however, always have the spectre of a future military move taking me somewhere that I can't bring the shell with, and right now I have no viable plan for that circumstance - so far, I have been able to avoid it across 4 tours, and I fear my fortunes may change.

 

The point that most resonated with me was those who commented on how a major restoration like this can seem daunting - that I think is really the meat of it. I hate seeing the car sit, but I also want to fix it all the way the right way and it's a long job. 

 

In the end, seeing how many others have been through or are in LONG term projects like this, I am heartened a bit. My plan in the immediate future is to start organizing and better laying out some of the small tasks, so I can get back at it and perhaps see her roadworthy again, if not fully restored. At the same time, I am going to start exploring options for how to store the car long term, if I have to move and can't take it with me. I think that will make this decision for me, more than anything.

 

My thanks for your thoughts! It has been helpful.

Edited by JJorgensen52
Realized one of my thoughts wasn't complete 😂 (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I think it's safe to say that owning an old vehicle is an emotional decision, not a logical one. So, I think to that point, asking if keeping it is a good idea is the wrong approach. It's a horrible idea, any accountant will tell you that. But we do it anyway, right? 

 

I'm in a similar boat in terms of time. It's very hard to steal a few minutes here and there between family and work obligations. To me, this has meant a couple of things. First, planning is probably more crucial because the timeline to completion moves way out. A job that I could knock out in a weekend can take months now. I have to take really good notes and stay organized because I know that I will not remember where I left off. The second thing kind of relates to the first. I have to be very selective about new projects that I take on because it can move out the horizon for everything else that I have going. Part of that for me has meant thinning the herd a little for the things that I care the most about. Right now, I'm in the middle of trying to sell a vehicle because to do it justice would take time away from my Buick. 

 

Last of all, we own things, they are not supposed to own us. Good luck. 

Edited by drhach (see edit history)
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James, One thing I've not seen mentioned is that what you presently have appears to be a very clean (other than the mentioned rust) and complete car which will make a restoration easier and cheaper. Sell if and then "down the road" buy a replacement it will be difficult to find one this nice. You did not mention how the engine was running - assume decent as you drove it for six months. If you do not need to rebuild that is worth $$. Good luck with your decision.😉

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James, One thing I've not seen mentioned is that what you presently have appears to be a very clean (other than the mentioned rust) and complete car which will make a restoration easier and cheaper. Sell if and then "down the road" buy a replacement it will be difficult to find one this nice. You did not mention how the engine was running - assume decent as you drove it for six months. If you do not need to rebuild that is worth $$. Good luck with your decision.😉

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Sell it - or don't.  You can always find another car.  You will likely always have fond memories of owning the present car.  You will always discover new fond memories of another car.  

 

I'm at a minimalist stage of my life right now, getting rid of a few possessions feels really good.  Learning what I can actually sell something for helps temper me from buying the next possesion knowing it is worth half of what I'm about to pay.

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1 hour ago, kgreen said:

I'm at a minimalist stage of my life right now, getting rid of a few possessions feels really good.

 

It would feel a whole lot better if it wasn't just your best stuff that sold.

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21 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

It would feel a whole lot better if it wasn't just your best stuff that sold.

Ain't that the truth.  Do you own as much junk as me?  Nevermind, I can't deal with a full confession.

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On 5/8/2020 at 7:19 AM, kgreen said:

Do you own as much junk as me? 

 

Oooooooooo -- I smell a bargain!  ;)

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I fully understand desires, dreams, and such.  But I also understand the realities of being in "the service" and having to move every few years, as a complicating factor.  Plus, over the years, I've seen seemingly good cars be disassembled for repairs/restorations and that's as far as they ever get.  Oh, and have seen "life events" and growing families, happen too.

 

To me, the main issue would be the periodic residential moves.  If you've not finished with those, then it might be best to sell it and go on.  Obviously, your family focus should be on "the kids", for at least another decade or so (sounds like a long time, doesn't it?).  Plus a certain amount of focus on your job that pays the fills for everybody.  Not to mention being able to park all of your daily vehicles in the same garage, if needed.  But there can be work-around for that.

 

Let's say you sell the car for what you can get for it, you've lost money.  IF you find a good, secure off-site storage place for it, it costs money.  IF you sell it, what will fill that void in your life and dreams?  At what cost?  Will/does your spouse consider it a nuisance that is tolerated?  Will the money from the sale be used for something needed in the long term???

 

Just as being married or single, EVERYTHING has its own benefits and costs.  Just depends upon which way you might desire to go.

 

Looking to the future, though.  In another local car club, we observed as younger, single, members got married, still coming to the meetings.  Then kids happened and their projects got put on hold.  We didn't see them as often and their membership lapsed.  Several years later, they'd show up again, wife and kid(s) in tow.  With great smiles by everybody!  We were as glad to see them as they were to see us, which I considered a great thing for all involved.  Their wives were welcomed by the other wives, too, which furthered things along, too!  MOst has somewhat stable jobs, so no periodic residential changes.  They just threw some blankets on the car and let it sleep.  Never losing sight of their dreams AND relaying the love of their vehicles to their kids!

 

IF periodic moves might be part of your employer's plan, then that deal might be a central part of the decision process.  Where might your next moves be to might also figure into the deal, too.  OR are you at a pay grade where you could opt-out for a future move, and then leave when the next move is needed?  In other words, will these moves be to places you might desire to stay, in the future?  Or are you already there?  When that final move is executed, then you can be more likely to have a place with a large enough garage to "play cars" in without negatively-impacting parking of other vehicles?  OR can find a house on a lot where a detached "work shop" can happen inside of a 8' tall privacy fence!

 

SO, this isn't just about your life in the short term, but making plans for the LONG TERM too!  Plus determining when you might leave "the service" and how all of that might impact things already "in process".

 

BUT there is ONE thing in this whole mix.  This is NOT the time to be selling any sort of project car!  Unless you need to in order to pay daily bills.  There will be people who are also looking to "scoop up bargains", taking advantage of somebody else's poor current situation.  For those people, the current economic situation is a buying opportunity that is helping them along in their ventures/activities.  AND, they most probably will be having somebody else to the work on what they bought, typically.  The other "hidden secret" is that the market is not going to rebound nearly as quickly as some like to believe.  End result, your potential selling price might not be much more than "scrap price", unfortunately.  The probability of finding another '63-'64 Buick "coupe" person can be another very "niche" sort of thing.  Somebody that appreciates what you've done already and will add that into the price of an in-pieces vehicle.

 

On the other side of things, IF and WHEN you decide to indulge in another similar Buick, what will it cost to purchase a similar car (most probably in similar condition) 10-15 years into the future?  IF you took your selling price, put it into a good interest-bearing account for that same period of time, then used it to put against the price of your future Buick, how much extra might be needed then?

 

AND (another one), if you do sell the car, when you need some stress relief from the job or life, what form might that take????  The WORST thing that could happen would be to walk into the garage, see the empty space, and wish it'd never been sold.  With it still there, you can have something to tinker with, even learn how to do some of the restorarion activities on the sheet metal, for example.  Something to keep your mind sane in an insane world!

 

Still, a main thing is your career path and where it might lead you in this wonderful world.

 

Apologies for the length.  Best of luck!

NTX5467

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