bryankazmer

color impact on resale

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9 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

And for those who really can't make up their mind...

 

The 1970 Barracuda 'color chip car' that was used in advertising.

1970_Cuda_CCC.jpg

 

 

I remember reading a number of years ago in Car and Driver that there was a correlation between car colors and the color of lingerie,  not quite sure where this car fits in with that.

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I’m a big fan of weirder color combos. My favorite interior color I’ve had was manroo. The other three cars are grey and I’m starting to really hate grey interiors. But two of my cars have been green and both a darker shade. I like green cars you don’t see them too often and most of them are usually very striking. The 95 neon was green/grey, 97 lesabre silver/Black/faded/ maroon, 98 lesabre is green/grey and the 91 reatta is maroon/grey

CD79F422-4E97-4541-9ED7-1BA97CC35B7C.jpeg

531D6C2E-FC09-4BBB-B52F-34BC6B7E7E2D.jpeg

A6092BD7-34A6-49EE-ADC4-A88C715C0958.jpeg

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Dark greens were pretty much a 90's thing. Very few made it into the 2000's, I like the color. About the only color to survive over the last decade and a half is red. Silver, gray, white and black are not colors.

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My '55 Jag originally was Suede Green with darker green leather.  What saves it I think is the French Gray convertible top.  If and when I restore it I will use the original colors.

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12 hours ago, 8E45E said:

And for those who really can't make up their mind...

 

The 1970 Barracuda 'color chip car' that was used in advertising.

1970_Cuda_CCC.jpg

This car was built and  painted up to look like the ad years later.

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, 39BuickEight said:

I used to be a wholesaler for the largest producer of used cars in the world.  Generally people don’t like green, blue, or especially tan/gold/beige (aka old man tan).  They are harder to sell.  Really bright colors like yellow, orange, or a bright blue typically bring a premium as they are not common and generate attention whether they actually sell or not.  Also, people that do want bright colors will often pay a premium for the color they want.  That said, it’s also very regional.  We would ship gold cars south to Florida and Texas as they generally did better there (sun?).  Blue does better here (Kentucky) than some places just because people are obsessed with UK Wildcat basketball.  

 

Just a Mustang, but blue works on this one.  I would agree that the car style and age can dictate better or worse colors.  I don't think this color would not work on a prewar car.

IMG_0002.thumb.JPG.e5c233f74a997104194652eb91fb535d.JPG

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

In doing research for articles, I spoke to one of our

local members (the late Dave English) who was a

Packard specialist.  He said that while the color-chip

choices tended to be conservative, special orders and

salon models could be quite striking.  Indeed, in that

earlier era, some car makers offered 2-tone paint in the

color scheme of one's school colors.

 

I put the illustration of a bright 1934 Packard on the

cover of our AACA newsletter.  I then learned that one of

our own members owned that very car, a salon model!

Here are the ad and the car itself.  It's an original car,

so those colors definitely left the factory:

 

 

Ad-1934 Packard.jpg

1934 Packard salon--Frank Buck.JPG

 

 

Luxury Vintage Car stock image. Image of angle, details - 9623825

 

Luxury Vintage Car Rear — Stock Photo © Lawcain #68968605

 

Here is a 1935 Packard Twelve that is also in its original paint - some minor touch up, on spots though. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, GregLaR said:

 

NO

green9.jpg.9428ccfbe73f5a0be8737a57d023badc.jpg

 

Interestingly enough, this Auburn has always done pretty well sale wise (two or thee times now).  It use to have a horrid somewhat wild pattern dark olive leather in it that was replaced in black - that helped.  And it has done pretty well winning awards too.   The advantage is though that it is an incredibly rare V-12 car with a well done restoration.

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, GregLaR said:

 

NO

green7.jpg.53a06be15c658f9758bbfcffacfcb528.jpg

 

This Marmon was restored in its original color - keep in mind it was a Pace Car for the Indianapolis 500 when new. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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You guys have already said it a bunch of different ways.   You can't generalize on a color.    Depends on the era and body style.   Big Bad Orange can sell a 70 AMX and would be the death of a 28 Sedan.

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18 hours ago, GregLaR said:

 

 

NO

green3.jpg.bb7aaf67e39838f8ce4ab6c15aa32ce8.jpg

 

This Cord is in the original Blue color pattern (aka I believe Cord L-29 offered a tu-tone blue as a standard color combination, along with a half dozen other standard color combinations), but the Blues are not what most would consider an authentic shade - it sat around for a good long time via sale, but it most likely its sitting around was more to do with the top  being the wrong color canvas matched to top snaps being visible, it had some interior issues, it has mismatched tires, it has a bunch of small authenticity issues under hood, and ....

 

 

 

 

 

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Guess age has something to do with it. Just can't take some of the modern fluorescent pinks and greens though have seen some nice root beer colors. Am glad the flat black murdered out craze is passing.

 

One difference is race cars. Painted my Corvette International school bus yellow because I was more interested in being seen than anything else.

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15 hours ago, JRA said:

I enjoy a lot the colors of my 1929 Dodge-Brothers, Six, brougham. All my 1920’s cars have black fenders, except this one, it seems very gracious to me. JRA

EE250D2B-4B18-4793-9796-E0AFFEAB60BD.jpeg

I usually steer away from Tan/Brown/Orange combinations via poor sales results via the color combination had huge popularity in the early 1970's, though not so much anymore - that said this car looks fine and it has to do more with the shades of each color (the brown being darker and the orange being more pale).  I am not sure what reaction would be if you put it up for sale, but given it not being a 5K to 100K plus car and that it looks to be a very well restored car, I do not think it would be a bloodbath.   When friends something Tan/Brown/Orange, I have been recommending painting the wheels some sort of complimentary maroon - not the best stop gap, but better than not solution. The problem is a lot of car will always be the color they are as just not cost effective to ever repaint them again. 

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16 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Once green it is hard to picture the car in another color. Bob 

OIP0VF6C4G8.jpg

BRG aka British Racing Green - it is particular fitting to Bentleys, Aston Martins, MG's, and .... - Period correct and the World is very use to the color.  

 

Put the same color on something American and kiss any decent sales price goodbye. 

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Posted (edited)

This Duesnberg is painted a late 1960's to early 1970's Mercedes Benz 280 SL Blue - I would say it was one of the most beautiful Blue colors ever made and have never heard a single person complain yet.

 

<b>1934 Duesenberg Model J Torpedo Phaeton</b><br />Chassis no. 2579<br />Engine no. J555

 

<b>1934 Duesenberg Model J Torpedo Phaeton</b><br />Chassis no. 2579<br />Engine no. J555

 

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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9 minutes ago, padgett said:

 Am glad the flat black murdered out craze is passing.

 

Ditto.

Of all the paint trends over the years, that is really the worst.

Makes me miss the "flocked" or "velva-car" paint jobs of the early 70's!

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Posted (edited)

If I were to restore my 1912 Ford that is as close to the correct shade of blue Ford used. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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19 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

In doing research for articles, I spoke to one of our

local members (the late Dave English) who was a

Packard specialist.  He said that while the color-chip

choices tended to be conservative, special orders and

salon models could be quite striking.  Indeed, in that

earlier era, some car makers offered 2-tone paint in the

color scheme of one's school colors.

 

I put the illustration of a bright 1934 Packard on the

cover of our AACA newsletter.  I then learned that one of

our own members owned that very car, a salon model!

Here are the ad and the car itself.  It's an original car,

so those colors definitely left the factory:

 

 

Ad-1934 Packard.jpg

1934 Packard salon--Frank Buck.JPG

 

 

And today:

America's Packard Museum at Citizens Motorcar Company ...

 

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Until I joined this forum, I had no idea that there was a stigma around green cars, other than in auto racing. And I've been obsessed with cars forever.  I consider Mopar "Sublime Green" my favorite factory color ever. We have had three green cars in my life, but all were gone before I was 10 years old, and all were Ford wagons.

 

Green is and always has been my favorite color. My walls are green, the shirt I'm wearing as I type this is green.  (actually, same one as seen in my profile picture, where I'm also wearing a green hat)

 

This was my dad's last car....1985 Volkswagen Quantum. It was metallic brown but the hood and truck were multiple shades as it faded and peeled over the years. We used to tease the car by calling it the Poopmobile.

2vgLT4D4x2zUmm.jpg

This thing survived getting hit by a bus and a snowplow. (note the askew rear bumper) The door handle rusted off at one point from the driver's door and dad would stick his finger in the rusty hole to depress the button. 

 

it's the only brown car my family has ever owned, to my knowledge. 

 

I have no idea what the factory color on our Torino wagon was. Does anyone know? It was metallic orange, with dark brown vinyl interior. This photo was taken in 1991, I was in the passenger seat at 6 years old. Dad driving. This was it's last ride, he junked it after that. Wish I could have it back. The 1983 Chevrolet Citation hatchback that replaced it is visible in the bottom left.

2vC9ibeWx2zUmm.jpg

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17 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

 

Ditto.

Of all the paint trends over the years, that is really the worst.

Makes me miss the "flocked" or "velva-car" paint jobs of the early 70's!

 

 

It started with guys building "traditional" hot rods.  The theory was 50s rodders spent all their money on mechanicals and so could afford only primer, not paint - not sure that's true but whatever.  The counterculture rat rodders adopted it as part of their protest against "shiny stuff."  I've seen a few flat red and flat gray but most are black.  I didn't like it at first but it's kinda grown on me.  It's OK on something like a rat rod (and I hate most of those) or a fenderless 32 Ford roadster.  But the problem is everybody started painting everything flat black.

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I really don't have a favorite color although I am somewhat partial to red.  I've owned cars that were green, red, yellow, orange, silver, white, gold or black.  The only one I'd never have again is black - too high maintenance.  It shows every flaw - nothing looks better when it's clean or worse when it's dirty (and it always is 🤣).  My current ride is a dark green/gray interior pickup.

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24 minutes ago, CHuDWah said:

  It's OK on something like a rat rod (and I hate most of those) 

 

Now THAT'S funny right there! 😄

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I don't think Rats should get paint.

The Flat John Deere chassis paint is definitely an economic thing. Sixty bucks plus labor.

Done both.

 

I won the pin stripe job at a car show, People still ask what color is it going to be.

Some people just don't get it.

 

The guy that donated the pin stripes said it took about three times as much paint as usual. He had never done a rust finish before.

 

 

28 Dodge project 025.jpg

578232_10151489958394536_1003595101_n.jpg

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30 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

 

Now THAT'S funny right there! 😄

 

 

Well, I only said flat black is OK on rat rods - I didn't say rat rods are OK.  😉

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Billy Kingsley said:

This was my dad's last car....1985 Volkswagen Quantum. It was metallic brown but the hood and truck were multiple shades as it faded and peeled over the years. We used to tease the car by calling it the Poopmobile.

2vgLT4D4x2zUmm.jpg

This thing survived getting hit by a bus and a snowplow. (note the askew rear bumper) The door handle rusted off at one point from the driver's door and dad would stick his finger in the rusty hole to depress the button. 

 

it's the only brown car my family has ever owned, to my knowledge.

In 1972, someone my mom worked with bought a brand new Mustang, and on her way home from the dealership, swung by our house to show it to her.  First thing I looked at was the dealer invoice to see what it had for options, and it was exactly what I had thought; a typical bland and ordinary (to me) off-the-lot Mustang hardtop.  Nothing special in the engine or transmission dept., 302-2V, C4 automatic, AM radio, (whoopie).  The ONLY thing I can say that caught my eye on it were the kitchen cooks FoMoCo must have consulted in the staff dining room to play 'Name That Color'.  According to the invoice, it was MEDIUM GINGER METALLIC with a Nutmeg interior!

 

Craig 

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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