bryankazmer

color impact on resale

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Can't beat black and brass imho.

Terry

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

My former 74 Eldo in Persian Lime Metallic. I bought because of the color. My friend's in the used car business called it "No Sale Green"

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I'm with Zepher.

I like my blue car !

But then, black is nice too.

 

Mike in Colorado

1931_chrysler_imperial_4_door_sedan_limousine_5eb80cf29b.jpg

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First, I would always paint a car with factory colors. Second, I would tend to paint it a color such as black or dark blue or green, if it's a nice shade of green, not something garish such as lime. Remember the old saying "It's just as easy to paint a car the right color, as it is to paint it the wrong color". I think one of the biggest turn off's on purchasing an antique car, is a car painted in non-factory colors. For example, I have an acquaintance that has an absolutely beautiful V-8 Ford, however it's painted a non-factory color. He claims that he had one just like it painted this color when he was younger and even when we showed him the color chart, had it painted the wrong color. Every car show he first went to with the car, he was deducted massive points for the color and every show resulted in an argument with the judges. As a result the car hasn't  been out of the garage in several years. If it's a car such as a street rod, nothing dates it like paint. Back in the '90's the big thing in street rod paint was aqua or peach. Ten years later you couldn't give a car away that was painted in these colors. 

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Dark blue light blue I never had a problem wanting one of these. Bob 

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1 hour ago, TerryB said:

Don’t tell me, let me guess, it was the 1973 Monte.  In 1973 I bought a new 1973 Chevelle SS 350ci in gray/silver color with black SS stripes on the bottom. Had tilt wheel, auto, posi rear and those cool one piece swivel bucket seats.  It was memorable for all the worst reasons.  The 1977 Nova Rally was its replacement and a much better car overall.

Yep, 73 MC. Orange. Swivel buckets, leaky sunroof, peely vinyl top I had refinished, what a scam...  no power, crap carb, ignition, trans linkage, and on a quiet night you could hear it rust.  I am sure I am forgetting a few things...

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I wonder how well these went over in their era.

Today, they would certainly attract onlookers at a 

major show:

 

---A 3-toned red-green-black 1928 Packard coupe

from an original advertisement.  Good today for

Christmas parades!

---A bright orange and silver-green 1930 Packard from

a Packard catalogue at the AACA Library.  What a strange

combination!

 

 

1928 Packard red-green cropped.jpg

1930 Packard--orange and green 1a.jpg

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Just now, John_S_in_Penna said:

I wonder how well these went over in their era.

Today, they would certainly attract onlookers at a 

major show:

 

---A 3-toned red-green-black 1928 Packard coupe

from an original advertisement.  Good today for

Christmas parades!

---A bright orange and silver-green 1930 Packard from

a Packard catalogue at the AACA Library.  What a strange

combination!

In the late 1920s, color magazine advertising became relatively cheap almost overnight due to technological development in the printing industry.  Lincoln (with exotic colorful birds) and Packard were quick to jump on the bandwagon with color advertising, but all were artists' renditions, which were replicated in their print catalogs.  But if one looks at color charts/chips of that era, the factory choices were far more conservative.

 

About 20 (or more) years ago, there was a Packard 633 (short wheelbase) phaeton which made the rounds of local shows, resplendent in THREE shades of purple, and with a framed magazine ad showing the same colors on the same car.  I'll bet those colors never left the factory on anything, despite the factory's willingness to paint to the buyer's choice.

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49 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Yep, 73 MC. Orange. Swivel buckets, leaky sunroof, peely vinyl top I had refinished, what a scam...  no power, crap carb, ignition, trans linkage, and on a quiet night you could hear it rust.  I am sure I am forgetting a few things...

That’s what made the Nova so much better a car. Good running 305ci V8, no rusting issues and a pleasure to drive. Sold it in 1983 with 60k miles on it because THIS showed up at the dealership. Red, 5speed, and the rest of the z28 goodies.  This one was a love/hate relationship.  It had a few “what were they thinking of issues” like no drip rails so opening the door on a rainy day resulting in a wet backside among other niggles.
 

EB8B9083-96F4-421C-AE1D-0CA880C02EFD.jpeg

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Grimy said:

...all were artists' renditions, which were replicated in their print catalogs.  But if one looks at color charts/chips of that era, the factory choices were far more conservative.

 

In doing research for articles, I spoke to one of our

local members (the late Dave English) who was a

Packard specialist.  He said that while the color-chip

choices tended to be conservative, special orders and

salon models could be quite striking.  Indeed, in that

earlier era, some car makers offered 2-tone paint in the

color scheme of one's school colors.

 

I put the illustration of a bright 1934 Packard on the

cover of our AACA newsletter.  I then learned that one of

our own members owned that very car, a salon model!

Here are the ad and the car itself.  It's an original car,

so those colors definitely left the factory:

 

 

Ad-1934 Packard.jpg

1934 Packard salon--Frank Buck.JPG

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

To everything, there is a season.

As Grimy pointed out, most colors can work, provided they're on the correct vehicle. Different eras find different colors acceptable. In the early '70's for example,many cars were brightly colored and it worked.

Here in California it seems 99% of the cars on the road are not only completely indistinguishable from one another but only come in white, tan or silver (blah). I am also of the opinion that red belongs on fire trucks. For me it has just been done to death and is my last choice when shopping for a car. Especially on a Corvette. Maybe because I've owned quite a few Corvettes, the red ones are too cliche'. But I'm weird because I like green cars so you can see my opinion on this subject is valueless. I am in complete agreement with others here that silver or gray should never have been paired with a tan interior on any platform. It is hideous. 

 

YES

green2.jpg.24a9b0fb9e7c00b5ff8712233f43d625.jpg

 

NO

green9.jpg.9428ccfbe73f5a0be8737a57d023badc.jpg

 

YES

green4.jpg.c19865afbd92587b8f8497e2ff4849d8.jpg

 

NO

green3.jpg.bb7aaf67e39838f8ce4ab6c15aa32ce8.jpg

 

YES

green6.jpg.367bd3a984665f6ec1fdf6e4d374d97b.jpg

 

NO

 

green5.jpg.ae8e8f8804085a43a34e90844a736bf1.jpg

 

YES

green8.jpg.4ed7bd3c9450cc0f09ee7d2652f82644.jpg

 

NO

green7.jpg.53a06be15c658f9758bbfcffacfcb528.jpg

 

NO

green10.jpg.aa207dabbad4fe1910378576a4be81f9.jpg

 

And four decades later, still NO.

GREEN11.jpg.2028c8b1294fca2822bff77cc73c8d56.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
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For a guy like me who tends to favor form over color, I seen to spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about color. To make it clear if I think that the car is right but the color is questionable I will go with the car. I have never bought a new car and never expect to. My transportation cars are all twenty five years old or older, so I take a good car in whatever color comes with. I do require that my daily drivers have their original paint and be presentable. In general I prefer a dark color on a larger cars, sedans and cars from the 20's and 30's.

 

 

My personal tastes aside, I do pay attention to how people respond to cars and their color. With my collector cars it comes down to knowing my audience. I also try to never loose sight of the fact that my better half is in this thing with me. Color is much more important to a women then it is to a man! Choosing the right car without consulting your better half is almost certainly a recipe for disaster. You have a better chance of getting by with the wrong car with an acceptable color then vise versa. IMHO women like red-in about any shade, white and with some reservations yellow.  They tend to like brighter colors, but then they like smaller cars, which make these colors work better anyway. In general they don't like green,gray or black!

 

 

Contemporary colors tend to creep into choices made for many of our collector cars. Colors also become popular for for awhile and then completely fall from favor, only to reappear decades later. Similar to what happens to two toning, which gives rise to the use of lighter and darker colors, then mostly disappear. I'm amused by the fact that during much of two decades following the war, black fell completely fell out favor. When two tonning became popular during the emotional upswing of the mid 50's it began to creep back, but remained a no show until the 90's.  However today cars like the 1953-54 Studebaker coupe and 1957 Chevrolet black is one of the most popular choices.

 

 

We don't live in vacuum or in isolation. I think we all want our cars appreciated, but pleasing everybody is impossible. But our cars are going to be around for a lot longer then we are, choosing a contemporary color for today's audience, may be doing a disservice to the car and to our legacy.

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Will take a mild objection to "Good running 305ci V8". Maybe for someone who had not experienced great V8s of about a decade earlier. The 1967-69 Z-28 302 had a big 4" bore from the 327 and a short stroke crank from the 283 and with enough cam and carbs would wind to the moon.

 

And then there was the 305. 3.48" 350 crank and a 283 (3.875) bore. Near square. Capped with a 2GC two barrel (were a few LG4s with a QJ, very few). Small valve heads. Was rated at 145hp (1977-1978) and 135 hp (1979-on). Lottsa torque (first in a four speed with B70-13 tires was almost useless unless you like smoke) but beating a ded horse over 4k.

 

I vas dere.

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This color has grown on me throughout the years I've owned the car. I hate Camaro convertibles painted fire engine red or electric yellow. The official name of my color is 1989 Camaro Flame Red Poly.  

 

When I decide to finally sell the car, I'm calling the color Texas A&M (Aggie) Maroon.

89Camaro at Thrall.JPG

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5 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

...Gold and black are my alma mater's school colors...

 

 

I bought a new 71 Cutlass that was "Bittersweet" (sort of orange-y) with black interior.  Mine wasn't a convertible but here's the color:

 

$_3.JPG?set_id=880000500F

 

It never occurred to me until I read your post but orange and black were my high school colors.  :D

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Each person is different, but green is my least favorite color for an old car. To each his own. 

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Once green it is hard to picture the car in another color. Bob 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, padgett said:

Will take a mild objection to "Good running 305ci V8". Maybe for someone who had not experienced great V8s of about a decade earlier. The 1967-69 Z-28 302 had a big 4" bore from the 327 and a short stroke crank from the 283 and with enough cam and carbs would wind to the moon.

 

And then there was the 305. 3.48" 350 crank and a 283 (3.875) bore. Near square. Capped with a 2GC two barrel (were a few LG4s with a QJ, very few). Small valve heads. Was rated at 145hp (1977-1978) and 135 hp (1979-on). Lottsa torque (first in a four speed with B70-13 tires was almost useless unless you like smoke) but beating a ded horse over 4k.

 

I vas dere.

Compared to the smog choked 350 in my 73 the 305 was good.  In the 1983 we were coming off the era of gas stingy so the Z28 was some performance in an era of 4 or 6 cyl is better thinking. Compared to the 1960s small blocks it was no great performance engine.  Good running meant easy starting, smooth running and no leaks.  It’s all relative isn’t it.  Today little engines get a lot more hp out of less displacement and better gas mileage.  The red Z28 was my last new fun car.  I did get a 1937 Dodge truck and a 1964 Plymouth as hobby cars and a Vespa scooter and a little Yamaha enduro for fun.  Motorcycles were my go to when I really wanted something to give me a thrill. Twenty five years of motorcycle competition riding and a total of 39 years with touring and then one very bad day.

463D9C7A-6192-4ABA-BD7C-F92FD3C9CE8C.jpeg

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, GregLaR said:

NO

 

green9.jpg.9428ccfbe73f5a0be8737a57d023badc.jpg

 

 

84e4f-kermit1.jpg?w=230

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Posted (edited)

I enjoy a lot the colors of my 1929 Dodge-Brothers, Six, brougham. All my 1920’s cars have black fenders, except this one, it seems very gracious to me. JRA

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Edited by JRA (see edit history)
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As others have said, it really depends on the era. Some colors work on certain cars--weird greens and earth tones are good for the late '60s and early '70s, but probably a failure elsewhere. Bright white cars in the 1930s are a mistake but white is great for the '80s. There's a lot of talk that green is the kiss of death, but again it depends on the car, the era, and the green. Green isn't 100% failure--I like my dark green 1929 Cadillac, I love Mosport Green on a mid-year Corvette, and Grimy's Pierce is gorgeous. The bright green Auburn? Meh. And ugly greens are always ugly.

 

But I still think good taste is paramount. While I was born in 1970, I have to imagine that the awful greens and oranges and browns of that period were not considered attractive, they were just "in fashion." Nobody loved those colors or thought they were pretty, right? 

 

The closest thing I can think of to a guaranteed failure is brown. Brown has been making a comeback lately and there are some handsome late-model colors that are brown, but I still wouldn't buy a car in the color simply because of resale issues. Even though I like it now, if we're talking resale, I have to think about what the next guy will want and brown goes out of style faster than anything else.


There are also fad colors that will look dated and will likely fall out of favor. Like all the bright colors on Jeeps--neon oranges, yellows, greens. They'll probably be supplanted by something else that's cool and they'll look dated and fewer people will want them. I also think the satin paint fad will badly date cars from today, and again, some cars just don't look right. I have to admit I like the satin orange on some BMWs but there's a satin blue Audi near my shop that just looks like an old, faded paint job. Not right. 

 

The real truth is that if it looks good, it will always look good. Good taste is always in fashion.

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Posted (edited)

Great thread. Never heard of “old man gold” before, but here it is. 

 

Mark

 

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Edited by Mark I (see edit history)
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Current green car. Just a reminder of cars long goneRestored 1967 Ford Mustang Convertible for sale on BaT Auctions ...

 

 

vetstang 002.jpg

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My green wagon was special ordered. The green was standard but not with a saddle interior.

 

goatwgn.jpg

 

Shown when eligible for AACA. Was a great tow car.

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And for those who really can't make up their mind...

 

The 1970 Barracuda 'color chip car' that was used in advertising.

1970_Cuda_CCC.jpg

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