Jump to content

Brake Adjustment Tool For Sale $100 USD Shipped


Recommended Posts

Hi folks, I had a tool made to try and set up my old Mopar brakes better. The original Miller tool is quite pricey, so I needed to do something else. I had great success using this tool to set my shoes concentric to the drums. I've had a few people ask if I'd consider making more of the same tool. So I did.

 

I had my friend make up a batch of 5 . I’ve used this tool on my 1938 with 10” brakes and my 1953 with 11” brakes.  Axle thread nut is ¾”-16. Only USA high quality hardware used. $100 USD, for 1 shipped anywhere in USA or Canada.  $110 USD to $120 USD shipped to Australia. Any interest? Prefer Paypal. Price includes prepaid shipping within Canada, USA  or Australia too!

. - Keith

 

 

Tool 1.jpg

Tool 2.jpg

Brake Tool (1).jpg

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be wrong,  but the original tool has  another piece,,    the distance from the center to the outside of drum has to be established  to set the distance of shoes in relation of drum   that is the key to have a good, high peddle ------

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the original tool measures the inside drum diameter. Also the toe and the heel settings separately. It does help in getting you the best brake setting you can set up. The original tool sells for about $600-$700 USD plus shipping. This  $100 tool works very well to get your shoes concentric to the drums, netting an improved brake system. I've used it for set shoe set up and enjoyed much improved braking. Seems to me, it gets me quite close, quickly, and for much less cost. 

 

What I did was adjust a shoe until it made contact with the drum. Backed it off slightly, then removed the drum. Then used this position as my benchmark. Set my tool here, then around the shoes, setting them both up. Equal distance. Concentric all the way around. Netting very good, much improved brake performance. I have a good high pedal.

 

I could not justify the cost for the original tool. So I made this. It worked well. Others have asked if I'd consider building more. I did and offered them to others. The batch of 5 all sold. I am sure they'll help other Mopar owners set up their brakes. Cheers, Keith.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Seven sold. I have 3 remaining from batch #2.  If in need send me a message.  

I tweaked my Chrysler brakes this past weekend. They feel great!

Thanks. 
 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hilgretasmom1 said:

Do you have any of the brake adjustment tools left? If so, how do I obtain one?

 

Yes i have some left. Please send me an email to obtain one at kbarron2679@gmail.com

1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

I wish I'd seen this sooner. If there are any left after the gentlemen ahead of me, 'll take one as well!

 

Yes, guys I'd be happy to send you both one.  I look forward to hearing from you. - Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

Got mine and it works quite well. Thanks, Keith.

 

 

I am glad to hear that Kaiser. You were quick to get on the brakes and try it out! 

Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites

It does rotate on the front spindles. They are threaded with the exact same thread pitch and diameter as the rear axles.  The tool works on all 4 corners. The photo seen above it is mounted on the LF wheel of my 1953 Chrysler. 
 

By chance I just used it today on the RF and LR of my ‘38 Plymouth brakes. 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Yes. I can ship Monday. $100 USD including shipped, standard ground to the USA or Canada. If you’d like one, I accept Paypal to kbarron2679@gmail.com

 

Thanks. Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just keep making more batches of these tools as they sell. There are plenty of happy customers using their tools now. I won’t be running out of tools any time soon. I’ll just build more. 
 

So if you have a need, let me know. I’d be happy to supply you with one. 

 

Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites

Shipping into Australia now too folks. Sell price of the tool, prepaid shipping to down under is:

$110 USD via boat. Up to 6 weeks shipping time

$120 USD via Airmail. Up to 2 weeks they tell me. 

 

"Chees Maights".. ...Keith

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Auburncoupe do you have a photo or parts image of your brakes? I’d like to learn if they are the Lockheed brakes? My tool is designed for use with the Lockheed brake system. I’m not sure what your ‘57 Dodge Coronet brakes system is. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The tool will not work on your 57 Dodge Center Plane brakes.

The shoes are self centering.

They are much easier to adjust than the Lockheed brakes. There is a upper and lower 7/16" hex bolt used to adjust the front shoes and two even spaced hex bolts on the rear backing plates adjusting the rear shoes.

It's always smart to read the service manual to safely repair brakes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

@jukejunkie1015Hi Kurt,  I have not personally worked on a 31 Chyrsler brake system before. Do you know the size and thread pitch of the axle nut or front wheel spindle nut that hold the brake drums on? Usually they are the same on all 4 corners. ¾-16 is the nut size on my tool. So far it has fit every old Mopar that I have sold a tool for. Up to about 20 sales so far and the same nut has fit every old Mopar. I suspect it will fit you car, however I'd like to be sure before I sell you a tool. Thanks, Keith

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Hi folks. I just completed another batch of 4 tools. Now available if anyone is in need. Thanks to a fellow member here, I was recently able to determine that my tool will also work on the larger 1932 Chrysler brakes. They have a 12" ID drum. The tool will open up to about 13 ¼" diameter if needed.  This same tool also works on my 10" diameter 1938 Plymouth brakes, and my 1953 11" diameter Chrysler brakes.  I now know that it fits, 10", 11", or 12" brakes on the early Mopars. They all use the same ¾-16 axle/spindle thread too.

Regards, 

 

Keith

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
22 hours ago, doc bell said:

Do you have any of the tools left?

You betchya Doc. I keep building more. Must have sold 35 by now I estimate. Not 1 complaint yet!  They've been shipped to some pretty cool places I hadn't expected! Please e-mail me direct at kbarron2679@gmail.com if you'd like one. 

Thanks, Keith.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Keith, 

 

Thank you for making this and posting.  This looks seriously helpful and effective.  I'll reach out on email.  

 

There's a brake drum measuring tool that also measures to the shoes.  Its basically a caliper that has inside and outside measurements that you set the distance and match both the inside and outside.  It won't check concentric-ness though.  It might help to further refine the fit after using your tool if needed.  Do you think that it could be helpful or did you find that the "adjust until the shoe touches the drum" method worked well enough?

 

Attached is an example of the tool.  All I did was search for "drum brake tool measuring" and there were multiple options that come up.  I haven't used one of these yet so I'm not sure how well it works.

 

Christian

 

 

 

brake measuring tool.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, christianad1156 said:

Keith, 

 

Thank you for making this and posting.  This looks seriously helpful and effective.  I'll reach out on email.  

 

There's a brake drum measuring tool that also measures to the shoes.  Its basically a caliper that has inside and outside measurements that you set the distance and match both the inside and outside.  It won't check concentric-ness though.  It might help to further refine the fit after using your tool if needed.  Do you think that it could be helpful or did you find that the "adjust until the shoe touches the drum" method worked well enough?

 

Attached is an example of the tool.  All I did was search for "drum brake tool measuring" and there were multiple options that come up.  I haven't used one of these yet so I'm not sure how well it works.

 

Christian

 

 

 

brake measuring tool.jpg


 

This tool is a cheap piece of Chineseum...........not accurate. Good enough for a one ton dump truck, but on a pre war car, you need the real precision unit.....and they are expensive. I have the high end set, purchased at an auction years ago.........it was still something like 600 bucks.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, christianad1156 said:

Keith, 

 

Thank you for making this and posting.  This looks seriously helpful and effective.  I'll reach out on email.  

 

There's a brake drum measuring tool that also measures to the shoes.  Its basically a caliper that has inside and outside measurements that you set the distance and match both the inside and outside.  It won't check concentric-ness though.  It might help to further refine the fit after using your tool if needed.  Do you think that it could be helpful or did you find that the "adjust until the shoe touches the drum" method worked well enough?

 

Attached is an example of the tool.  All I did was search for "drum brake tool measuring" and there were multiple options that come up.  I haven't used one of these yet so I'm not sure how well it works.

 

Christian

 

 

 

 

 

I have seen that tool. I have no use for it.  The tool I offer will adequately set up your brakes, concentric.  The brakes work so much better when they are concentric. With the drum off I adjust them as far extended as I can, concentric, so that I can just barely squeeze the drums over.  Then with the wheel still in the air, I spin it by hand. I use the minor brake adjustment. Crank them out just a little further so they are just ever so slightly dragging on the drum.  The brakes work pretty darn well after that!

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...