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How “new” are your new tires?


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I just purchased 4 new bias ply tires for my ‘46 GMC pickup. These are a style popular for decades and sold under a myriad of brand names. Mine were manufactured in Thailand. As I prepared to have them mounted; I glanced at the DOT code and was surprised to see they may be 18 years old. The rubber looks new. A factory decal on the tires has a code of its own : 1-02.

The DOT code on the tires suggests a date of the 9th week if 2002. The letter “D” at the end is a puzzle. The seller promises a straight answer very soon; but I won’t be keeping them if they are already “teenagers”. Any thoughts? When is the last time you looked at the DOT code on your new tires?

FA19B696-3F70-4148-BAE8-E90A6B5CC49A.jpeg

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I have them show me the tires before they're mounted so I can check the date code myself. I bought a set of Goodyears at Walmart for my Studebaker pickup last July and they were all made in early 2019. I recommend that everyone do that. If it annoys the sales guy that's too bad....

Edited by Lebowski (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, greenie said:

I just purchased 4 new bias ply tires for my ‘46 GMC pickup. These are a style popular for decades and sold under a myriad of brand names. Mine were manufactured in Thailand. As I prepared to have them mounted; I glanced at the DOT code and was surprised to see they may be 18 years old. The rubber looks new. A factory decal on the tires has a code of its own : 1-02.

The DOT code on the tires suggests a date of the 9th week if 2002. The letter “D” at the end is a puzzle. The seller promises a straight answer very soon; but I won’t be keeping them if they are already “teenagers”. Any thoughts? When is the last time you looked at the DOT code on your new tires?

FA19B696-3F70-4148-BAE8-E90A6B5CC49A.jpeg

 

Usually any (manufacturing) date code introduced after 01-01-2000 is four digits (week & year), which in your case may mean 29th week of 02 ( I'm not sure what that "D" means) and if correct, I personally wouldn't drive on them.

I just received a (very) high value vintage sports car to my shop and need to do some tuning work, including (high speed) road testing, but tires on it were made in 2000 and while they have less than 1000 miles on them and look like new, I won't drive it with them on at any speed. 

It's amazing how little people value their life/safety and that of all others they encounter on the road, not to mention their (alleged) pride and joy car(s).

Same goes with anything else related to operational safety on motor vehicles, i.e. brakes, steering, suspension, etc

 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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Look on the other side of the tire. The date code is four decimal digits, no alphas and is usually in a separate block but may only be on one side of the tire. This one is 34th week of 2018.

 

tiredate.jpg

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7 hours ago, padgett said:

Look on the other side of the tire. The date code is four decimal digits, no alphas and is usually in a separate block but may only be on one side of the tire. This one is 34th week of 2018.

 

tiredate.jpg

 

You win the prize! On the back, I found a separate date code that says “0319”; so my new tires are only infants. That’s a relief. Check yours before you mount them!

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8 hours ago, padgett said:

Look on the other side of the tire. The date code is four decimal digits, no alphas and is usually in a separate block but may only be on one side of the tire. This one is 34th week of 2018.

 

tiredate.jpg

 

As Padgett noted, look on BOTH sides.

 

You will generally find DOT codes of 2 types

the 8 character code, separated into groups of 4 each tells who made the tire, (and where?). This is NOT the one you want for this purpose.

 

The 12 character code, following "DOT", separated into groups of 4 each IS the DATE CODE to look for, and is decoded as such:

 

4 digits,

1st TWO (2) digits is the number of the Week within the year  (example, 01 is first week of January; 26 would be approximately end of June; 48 is end of November/beginning of December

The last two (2) digits is the last two digits of the year of manufacture (eg: 20 is 2020; 11 is 2011)

 

Although some would disagree, the rule of thumb is that radial tires more than five to seven (5-7) years old should soon be considered for replacement, and that ten (10) years would be an outside maximum.

I err on the side of caution, and generally replace at 5 years despite minimal wear. One tread separation at speed with your family in the car or tow vehicle could make a huge difference - especially if it is the cause for loss of control.

 

Stay safe - don't take a chance with old rubber!

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BTW the first two digits tell you by whom and  where the tire was made:

2B DEESTONE LTD. OAMNOI SAMUTSAKOM     THAILAND

BE UNIROYAL GOODRICH TIRE MANUFACTURING TUSCALOOSA     ALABAMA  UNITED STATES

See here.

         
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12 hours ago, greenie said:

 

You win the prize! On the back, I found a separate date code that says “0319”; so my new tires are only infants. That’s a relief. Check yours before you mount them!

 

Just a friendly FYI, your tires are more like toddlers since they are approximately 1 year and 3 months old since they were born (ie manufactured).

 

When I purchase tires, I require that they are 6 months old or less. Not too long ago I looked at tires that were "On Clearance" at a well known store. Selling "new" tires that were nearly NINE YEARS OLD should be a crime. Not the first time this store has sold 5+ year old tires "On Clearance" either. I have purchased tires from this store on-line. When they were delivered to the store they could not find them for 2 days. Lucky for them the tires were only 4 months old so I took delivery.

Edited by charlier (see edit history)
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As to age it depends on the tire and its condition. In general garaged tires last longer than ones kept outside.The last tires I had separate while driving was somewhere arounnd 1979, were about 20% worn, and were only 2 years old. They were Firestone 500s.

 

These days I buy either Michelins or BFGs with an occasional Continental for German cars. All must be rated Excellent or better in the rain and have a cap ply.

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Good question.  Coker sent me two year old tires on my last order with them.  Unfortunately, I did not look at mfg dates until I had the tires rebalanced when they were three years old. 

 

On the flip side, this hobby isn't one of high volume sales, we should be lucky that someone actually caters to our needs.  In an economic  downturn like we see today, slow sales means new production is slowed and old inventory gets older.

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I note the tires say "regrooveable" on them, implying they're heavy truck tires. What kind of vehicle are they going on? I only ask because we had a 1950 Chevy 3100 pickup that I bought for my wife a few years ago, and the thing would rattle and shake itself to pieces going down the road even though everything was new, including the tires. We had the tires balanced a few times until I finally took it to my favorite truck tire place that does my innertube old car jobs. They said they were 10-ply heavy truck tires and that the lightweight 1/2-ton pickup would never get the belts warm enough to force them round again. Heavy trucks, no problem, the flat spots would work themselves out pretty quickly. But no matter how hot the day was, no matter how far we drove, no matter how fast we went, those tires would never get round on that little truck. We replaced them with some inexpensive blackwall radials and the ride improved 1000% and the vibrations were totally gone. It was night and day without changing the look significantly.

 

Just a thought. I don't know for certain, but it may be worth considering if you have trouble with vibrations and balancing those tires. Sometimes too much tire is too much tire.

 

IMG_20170420_142538924.thumb.jpg.6140bf60ebee6e6c2659dc08a5bc994f.jpg

 

Truck tires:

IMG_20170420_142644004a.thumb.jpg.a10c6e5fcac8dba17346a63400a31b72.jpg

 

Radials (plus trim rings):

007.thumb.JPG.1b381a89d27578e6036b9420afd90af1.JPG

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I just changed out the tires on my 63 Riv after 8 years and very few miles.  I am driving it more and more at speed and really don't want to lose a tire.  Same with motorcycle tires.  Worn, but still had miles left in them but were getting old.  

 

Someone referenced Firestone 500s from the 70s above.  Wasn't that the tire that Firestone recalled and replaced regardless of miles?  I recall a friend of mine got 5 brand new tires for his Dodge van in the late 70s and it cost him zip.  

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1 hour ago, Zimm63 said:

I just changed out the tires on my 63 Riv after 8 years and very few miles.  I am driving it more and more at speed and really don't want to lose a tire. 

With all due respect, but loosing a tire itself should be the least of ones concerns when driving with old/out dated, worn out or generally inadequately maintained vehicle and even if ones own personal safety/life or car is not a consideration above loosing a tire, safety of everyone else in or vicinity of that moving vehicle should always be top priority for anyone with privilege to share public roads with others.

 

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Personally and other than nail punctures, I have never lost a tire that did not give warning first. Is more a matter of being aware.

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Tires are the single most important safety item on any old car. I see guys driving around on 30-year-old tires on tour and it scares the hell out of me. They say, "I just bought those tires," losing track of the fact that 1992 was 28 years ago, or "they don't have many miles on them," without realizing that tires rarely wear out but the rubber does fail as a factor of time. For example, this Buick GS had a fresh restoration in 2008. It had new Michelin radials on it at that time. There were fewer than 800 miles on the restoration at the time this happened in 2016. All we did was move the car from inside the shop to the parking lot outside when we were re-arranging cars one day. No warning, no hissing, no strange sensations from behind the wheel, just park it, walk 5 steps back towards the shop, and kaBOOOOM!

 

007.thumb.JPG.533c4609c1292f8e6fe3c18bbe10177a.JPG  Explosion1.thumb.jpg.d660119662518e69d5dfa7930623d92c.jpg

 

These were name-brand Michelins, not "whatever you've got that's cheapest" from the gas station up the street and certainly not the junk from [redacted] antique tire company. Note how much tread was left on that tire and that there are no visible cracks in the sidewalls.

 

Tires matter. Perhaps you (the general "you" not anyone specific) haven't had a problem, but if you ever do you will wonder why you were so stupid to ignore the tires. When the repair bill comes, you'll wonder why you didn't just spend the money for the tires instead, which is surely a fraction of the cost of repairs after a blowout at speed. Lord help you if you hurt someone.

 

If you really think about it, amortizing the cost of a set of tires over their lifetime which is, say, eight to ten years, really only adds up to $70-200 a year at most. That's chump change in the old car world. You'll spend more than that on gas over the course of 10 years.

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So how old are martins again? ;) 

I have new rubber ready to be mounted on the Dodge.  Bought them at the end of 2019 new from a vintage tire dealer online.  Haven't checked the date but they are a very common size so Hopefully they move them fast enough to have somewhat fresh stock. 

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A couple years ago I bought 4 new WW radials for our 66 VW.  I replace them by

dates figuring 6 years maximum safe life for garage kept radial tires.  I bought

them from a major tire supplier for our hobby.  We discussed tire life expectancy

as the sole reason for my purchase.  When they arrived, 2 of the tires were 8

months old and 2 were 18 months old.   

I complained and got 25% back for the 2 that that were 18 months old. 

(25% of the 6 year life of the tires)  They also told me they very seldom get tires less than 6 months old.  

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, TTR said:

With all due respect, but loosing a tire itself should be the least of ones concerns when driving with old/out dated, worn out or generally inadequately maintained vehicle and even if ones own personal safety/life or car is not a consideration above loosing a tire, safety of everyone else in or vicinity of that moving vehicle should always be top priority for anyone with privilege to share public roads with others.

 

When I used the term "losing a tire" it was assumed that car guys would understand the possible consequences of such a thing happening at speed.   If you are very fortunate, all you have to deal with is replacing the tire(s).  From there it becomes more grim beginning at a trashed wheel and ending with dead people. 

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32 minutes ago, Zimm63 said:

When I used the term "losing a tire" it was assumed that car guys would understand the possible consequences of such a thing happening at speed.   If you are very fortunate, all you have to deal with is replacing the tire(s).  From there it becomes more grim beginning at a trashed wheel and ending with dead people. 

I have had 4 blowouts in my years of driving (61).  Three were early on, 1953 Buick left front simple, just hang on to the wheel and coast to a stop.  1953 Buick right rear, nothing to do just hang on while the back end went back and forth about six feet each way.  1953 Buick towing a 1926 Studebaker with a tow bar.  All was okay a 40 mph but at 45 mph a back tire on the Studebaker blew.  Not much traffic on a good two lane paved road.   When the dust settled we were on the opposite shoulder facing the opposite way.  I never had another blowout on a personal vehicle.   

Driving a GMC ambulance in 1976 (suburban with a raised roof and almost brand new Michlin tires) on a divided 4 lane highway.  At just over 100 mph the left rear tire blew.  By the time I stopped there were two trucks stopped on my side and two on the other side, as well as a car driven by a Doctor.  The Dr. climbed in the back with the attendant and patient.  The truckers wanted to know where the jack and spare were and said to get out of the way.  In five minutes we were on the road again.  An interesting aside (to me anyway) was that the only part of the tire that was left on the rim was the two beads.

Since then I have always known the age, condition and speed rating for tires on a vehicle I was driving.  Several times I refused to take a truck or bus out on the road because of old or badly worn tires.

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Not aiming this at any particular poster or individual. But I often read things about being "alarmed" about people's lack of caring about THEIR life or safety or the life or safety of OTHERS by driving more than a few years old. What totally alarms me is that we (as a people) have allowed our government (doing business ? in out name) to change what used to be important requirements for the manufacture and/or sale of automobile tires. 

Firestone destroyed their company by manufacturing defective tires. Firestone paid a heavy price for doing so. Back in the '80s, when my kids were very young, we had a 1972 Chrysler station wagon in beautiful condition. On a trip to visit grandparents about 300 miles away, I had two blowouts thirty miles apart. Fortunately, one through fortunate timing happened at low speed, and the other as padgett mentioned I could feel "something" and dropped my speed from 70 plus on a winding mountain road down to about 30 before it blew (I also pay close attention to how my car feels all the time I drive). After digging up a second spare in the middle of nowhere (a nasty recap from a gasoline station!), and getting safely to our destination, I bought two new high end tires. The tire shop then informed me that the two nearly new tires that had been on the car since we bought it, were in fact Firestone 500s under a different label (they had a list).

Other than certain specific cases, for specific purposes or where public safety was recklessly put at risk, tires had very specific guidelines to meet to be manufactured and sold to the general public in the USA. The chemical formulas for the "rubber" had to meet conditions for UV and oxide contamination. Casings had to be manufactured to meet many minimum severe conditions. Tires made decades ago could actually be relatively safe for twenty years and more of limited mileage. I do not know if any tire made today would have even been legal to manufacture and sell thirty (maybe even twenty?) years ago. Casings are way too thin, and poorly made (the mistake Firestone made!). The "rubber" is either too hard to flex well (an absolute necessity!), or too soft to wear well, and cracks badly due to low exposures to ozone or UV. Most tires manufactured in the recent twenty years are more dangerous at five years of age than a tire manufactured in the '60s was at twenty years of age.

Tire companies today make hundreds of millions of dollars every year replacing tires that aren't even half used yet.

 

I have a few 21 inch (model A and/or T) tires from the '60s or '70s and are nearly worn out, that I would be happy to put on a model T speedster and run at high speeds from coast to coast! They are certainly safer than any 30 inch clinchers I have seen new in ten years!

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8 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I note the tires say "regrooveable" on them, implying they're heavy truck tires. What kind of vehicle are they going on? I only ask because we had a 1950 Chevy 3100 pickup that I bought for my wife a few years ago, and the thing would rattle and shake itself to pieces going down the road even though everything was new, including the tires. We had the tires balanced a few times until I finally took it to my favorite truck tire place that does my innertube old car jobs. They said they were 10-ply heavy truck tires and that the lightweight 1/2-ton pickup would never get the belts warm enough to force them round again. Heavy trucks, no problem, the flat spots would work themselves out pretty quickly. But no matter how hot the day was, no matter how far we drove, no matter how fast we went, those tires would never get round on that little truck. We replaced them with some inexpensive blackwall radials and the ride improved 1000% and the vibrations were totally gone. It was night and day without changing the look significantly.

 

Just a thought. I don't know for certain, but it may be worth considering if you have trouble with vibrations and balancing those tires. Sometimes too much tire is too much tire.

 

IMG_20170420_142538924.thumb.jpg.6140bf60ebee6e6c2659dc08a5bc994f.jpg

 

Truck tires:

IMG_20170420_142644004a.thumb.jpg.a10c6e5fcac8dba17346a63400a31b72.jpg

 

Radials (plus trim rings):

007.thumb.JPG.1b381a89d27578e6036b9420afd90af1.JPG

 

The tires have a 6-ply rating and are labeled as light truck tires. I had them mounted and balanced today- and they are on my 1946 GMC 1/2 ton pickup. I drove the truck for about 30 minutes today and they ride very nice. The tread patch is maybe 1/4 inch narrower than the old tires. It seems Steering effort is somewhat reduced. This truck gets driven about once a month during nice weather for maybe 500 miles a year. In 23 years of ownership, it’s only long trip was to Carlisle to be part of a special display at the Carlisle truck show. That trip is about 40 miles from my home; and includes a climb through the orchard country just south of Carlisle. The GMC 228 6-cylinder climbed all the hills with torque to spare. After a while, my double-clutching actually gets pretty good.

39E3E5FE-F808-4884-AE79-E2B0A7001538.jpeg

Edited by greenie (see edit history)
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Nothing new, Bill Neely said stock 2 ply tires weren't even safe in the driveway over 50 years ago.

 

Radials are different with different sidewall and tread plies and today "ply rating" refers to load capacity and not actual plies. Any more I always look for a nylon cap ply. These started in trailer tires to prevent tread separation.

 

 

 

plies.jpg

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Very topical issue for me. Tried to drive my 1981 Corvette today after getting new calipers, U-joints and a few things done. This car has been indoors sitting for 20 years on Goodyear Eagle GT's with very little wear. Tires look great, but they are total junk and scared the crap outta me after a few miles. 225/70/15's are getting hard to find !

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I like BFGs, prefer to Micelins anymore. One of the few with sizes for my Judge: 235/60/15 and 255/70/15. Mine have that extra Nylon cap ply that keeps the tread from disintegrating in case of failure.

BFGOODRICH RADIAL T/A Performance All-Season  Size: P225/70R15 100S

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3 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Very topical issue for me. Tried to drive my 1981 Corvette today after getting new calipers, U-joints and a few things done. This car has been indoors sitting for 20 years on Goodyear Eagle GT's with very little wear. Tires look great, but they are total junk and scared the crap outta me after a few miles. 225/70/15's are getting hard to find !

 

I normally won't keep radials more than 5-7 years no matter what the mileage.

Just today I checked the tires on the 1988 C-4 Corvette convertible. They are BFGoodrich G-Force Sport Comp-2 A/S - 275/40ZR17. The date codes are 44th and 45th week of 2015 which means they are about 24 weeks into their 5th year. We've done cross-country round trips from New Orleans to Ohio, Los Angeles/Burbank, Ontario, Show Low, Wisconsin, El Paso, Orlando, etc. They show almost no wear, and are always indoors except when driving on tour. I'm sure it won't be too long before they are replaced as the idea of a tread separation tearing up the bodywork on an unrestored AACA Senior driver with roughly 150,xxx miles is beyond imagination.

1988 CORVETTE LEFT FRONT AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

1988 CORVETTE LEFT REAR AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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I put new tires on my Reatta last summer and what a difference that made. The previous owner said he just got them but you never know what that means without records. I’m definitely going to check the dates on my lesabres tires. My front two are more worn than my rear two and I only got them a year ago. But whitewalls don’t move to well so that makes me think they might be older. Somehow I’ve never thought to check the date code before. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

New car in the shop (not mine) so decided to check tires. Dunlop 650/700, only code I can find is G8917. This is the same on all four tires. Serial number? Date code? Tires show no wear and have no cracks. If this is not a date code does that indicate they are older than year 2000?

Thanks

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G8917. is not a date code. Many current tires only have the date code on one (usually back) side of the tire.Have had tires a few decades old that looked and drove just fine. Usually replace tires at 8-12 years anymore since do not know how they are made.

 

Have a couple to tires come apart in the garage one (Cordovan Radial GT made in the USA) I've had since the 90s and was used then only thing I can find for a date code makes no sense. Looked carefully on both sides of the tire.and this is all I could find. Any ideas. Know it was in trunk as spare in 2006.Ideas ?

 

ps the second block seems to end in 399. PJ is Kelly-Springfield.

 

cordovanp245.jpg

 

wholedot.jpg

 
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BTW I really like the BFGoodrich G-Force Sport Comp-2 A/S - 275/40ZR17, great tread design but that's too wide a tire for a 3500 lb car with all of the rain we get around here. I'd be concerned about aquaplaning and unladen understeer. Just my opinion, YMMV.

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On 4/22/2020 at 10:09 PM, padgett said:

I like BFGs, prefer to Micelins anymore. One of the few with sizes for my Judge: 235/60/15 and 255/70/15. Mine have that extra Nylon cap ply that keeps the tread from disintegrating in case of failure.

BFGOODRICH RADIAL T/A Performance All-Season  Size: P225/70R15 100S

 

 

Thanks for providing the specific model/part number to that product. Sometimes folks will recommend a part and don't give that info.

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  • 8 months later...

That size just sounds wrong. Do you have any more info? Maybe a picture of the old ones or the rims? Was this car sold in North America originally or was it exported somewhere else?

 

If you mean it has 26 inch rims I am really surprised, as that rim size is from an earlier time, and wasn't even common then. When 26 inch rims were a thing in the teens, that tire size would have been called 36x5, assuming they are straight sided tires. Coker might have some if you have deep pockets. If they are clinchers, all bets are off.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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On 4/23/2020 at 12:31 AM, Marty Roth said:

 

I normally won't keep radials more than 5-7 years no matter what the mileage.

Just today I checked the tires on the 1988 C-4 Corvette convertible. They are BFGoodrich G-Force Sport Comp-2 A/S - 275/40ZR17. The date codes are 44th and 45th week of 2015 which means they are about 24 weeks into their 5th year. We've done cross-country round trips from New Orleans to Ohio, Los Angeles/Burbank, Ontario, Show Low, Wisconsin, El Paso, Orlando, etc. They show almost no wear, and are always indoors except when driving on tour. I'm sure it won't be too long before they are replaced as the idea of a tread separation tearing up the bodywork on an unrestored AACA Senior driver with roughly 150,xxx miles is beyond imagination.

1988 CORVETTE LEFT FRONT AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

1988 CORVETTE LEFT REAR AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

Marty, there's nothing like a (new)  old tire coming apart on a Corvette. Sometimes we tend to leave them sitting and forget about how old they are. We look at the tread and still see new tires. For some reason when one lets go on a Corvette, they tend to take a bunch of fiberglass with them. Not to mention anyone standing in close proximity.  BTW, great looking car !

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I did what every one said not to,,,,,they told me it was unsafe,,, that the tire would be dry rotted and would explode ------I bought a set of tires ---15 to 20 years ago from a place in Hershey PA for my 32 Plymouth----had them stored in dry basement,,,tubes in unheated garage   put them on a year ago---did just a little driving at this point  no cracks, no separation . and after taking the weights off my wheels and painting them they seem to drive down the road with no shimmy or vibration----with a 6 wheel car just did not want to go for   $ 1000  plus-------am I just lucky ?

PLYMOUTH pa.JPG

Plymouth A.JPG

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1 minute ago, Morgansdad said:

Marty, there's nothing like a (new)  old tire coming apart on a Corvette. Sometimes we tend to leave them sitting and forget about how old they are. We look at the tread and still see new tires. For some reason when one lets go on a Corvette, they tend to take a bunch of fiberglass with them. Not to mention anyone standing in close proximity.  BTW, great looking car !

 

Thanks Morgansdad,

 

You amplify exactly what I'm preaching. 

I replace my tires, especially radials, based on age per date code moreso than treadwear, particularly on vintage cars, trailers, tow vehicles, as well as daily drivers.

Also, when having new tires installed, I require the installer to find the latest date codes of the stocked tires, and reserve the right to cancel the sale.

The soon-to-be-replaced tires on our Corvette have almost no wear other than a few cross-country trips for tour and/or show, and were only 3 or 4 weeks old when installed

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