Mischiefbrewer

Inherited Great Grandfather's Truck

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Hey guys, I'm new to the forum so thanks in advance for your help. As the title says, I just picked up this International and need some help identifying it. Any info you can provide would be helpful. 

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It looks like a 1949 KB2 but there was little difference during the '40's.

1949 KB2.jpg

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That is a real find. Congratulations. The title should give you the year. Tell us more about it. Does it run, condition of the body and drivetrain, etc. Keep us posted on your  progress. 

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Hey thanks. Unfortunately, there isn't a title. My uncle tried to restore it in the 70 but had to stop so it's mostly in tacked and all original. Original 214 flathead is in it, or at least that what I think it is. Pretty fair amount of surface rust in the cab but it's not rotted through

 

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If you can not transfer it into your name, any money invested in it will not be a wise investment unless you are planning to use it for off road use only. The general rule is get a title first, then start fixing it. If it has been in the family that long, there should be a way to file for a lost title depending on the state you are in. As  Tininadin stated above, it appears to be from the 40's. 

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As the grill does not have the stainless steel strips, it would make this a 'K' series, from 1941-1945. Minimal numbers were built during the war.

The 'KB' series started post WW2 and they all had stainless steel horizontal grill strips.

Same drivetrain from 1938-1949.

Marty 

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There should be a vehicle ID tag, about 2-1/2" x 5-1/2" affixed to the inside of the cab wall just to the left of the clutch pedal.

That will tell you a VIN as well as the engine, (213 green diamond), as well as the GVW.

 

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Hey guys, just following up. After a lot of digging through old boxes, I've found the vin as well as some other specs. According to the vin it's a 1946 Kb1 with a 213 Green Diamond. Thanks for all of you help!

With that being said, The motor maybe seized up. It's full of oil and will try to crank it this weekend. Planning for worst case scenario, does anyone have experience dropping another motor in this model? Is there anything that bolts in? I'm relying pretty heavily on this forum so any information you have would be great. Thanks again for the help!

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Those are good engines. If it can be saved that is  what I would do. Keep us updated on your progress.

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Do a search in Tech . on freeing seized engine at very lest mmo or other in cylinders and pre-pressurize oil system even with a hand  suction pump will get something in bearing . May want to drop pan first if it did not have oil in , or has water in it is a rebuild .   TAKE  it slow ,ask for help when needed , hate to see a vintage old engine go to waste .

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The spark plug holes will be over the valves, not the pistons, so what you want to do is take the plugs out and put diesel, or transmission fluid, or marvel mystery oil, or penetrating oil in the cylinders. Since the cylinders are over toward the drivers side, you need to get the oil over that direction rather than just in the hole. Liquid Wrench is close enough to diesel, and comes in a spray can with a little tube so you can choose what direction it goes. Hang on to the little red tube so it doesn't fall in the engine. The sooner you get it soaking the better, so do it now. Add more when you walk by it in a day or 2. Keep doing that. The longer it soaks, the easier time you will have. Good luck.

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