Jump to content

Driving gloves - yay or nay?


Jaybokay
 Share

Recommended Posts

Well, this is exactly what it says in the title. A little poll in order to determine how people here at the AACA feel about that time-honored automotive accessory. I personally am in the camp of YAY because I'm in Florida, a naturally hot and humid place (also the reason why I prefer fingerless ones as seen in this fun little video I made some time ago.) Also, my Stude just so happens to have MANUAL steering and a four-speed MANUAL (Borg-Warner, T-10) transmission, so it is good for that too!

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm thinking about going back to them.

 

My skin is naturally slippery (says the guy who still wonders why he wan't the starting goalkeeper on the high school soccer team) and our skinny steering wheels and manual steering are calling for gloves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of our AACA region members, who also posts on

this forum, has original bear-fur gloves from the early

days of motoring.  They're think and heavy with fur.

I tried them on indoors once, and very soon my hands

were getting hot.  Clearly, they worked extremely well

in those old open-motoring days!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brass-era cars have pretty grippable wheels and tillers, so I don't need to wear gloves for grip.  I wear them on cold days for comfort, but not on warm days, also for comfort.  But I always have some sturdy gloves with me if I'm driving the steam car, because anything I need to tinker with on the road will be HOT!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not really for them or against them, although I do usually drive bare handed. I would say the ventilated and especially fingerless driving gloves are just part of the uniform if you have an old British roadster, or some sort of a barely-legal track car. I wouldn't mind having a pair if I owned a car with really heavy steering, although my manual-steering 36 Pontiac doesn't really qualify. It is easy to drive. The wooden steering wheel on my 1913 Studebaker is a little slippery. It might not hurt to have some for that.

 

Where I grew up we had really cold winters, and I don't remember seeing many fingerless gloves. Gloves used for driving were extremely soft, tight fitting, no liner, and no holes. The idea was to keep your hands from freezing until the heat started to work, but not interfere with any hand motion. They were excellent for grip too, though you probably didn't need that with the big American cars most people were driving. You see gloves that look about like them all over, but put one on and they aren't. They should be like a second skin. Sometime in the late 80s my boss showed up at work with some gloves like that, the real thing. I hadn't seen any in years. They were made of deerskin, and he told me he got them at a gun show. I am not a shooter, but I went to a couple of gun shows looking and came up empty.

 

Last year on a road trip I finally got some. They were at a truck stop out in the middle of the USA somewhere. They had several sizes, deerskin, pigskin, cow leather, black, brown, tan, etc. These are nice, really soft and fit like they should. I have not used them yet, but the Pontiac has no heater and I have a feeling they are going to come in handy.

 

Now I should find some proper fingerless ones like yours too...   Nice Hawk, BTW!

 

T470U0S.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't use gloves now but if I ever did use them I would use some very light weight deerskin motorcycle summer gloves.

I have a pair I use when I ride and they end up conforming to your hands perfectly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, nick8086 said:

I take some to the car shows..If I detailing the car at the show it cut back on finger prints.. on the chrome..

IMG_8061.JPG

 

Am I right in assuming that that's a Kaiser-Darrin? If so, cheers to you! I always though Kaiser in general got a rotten deal in the automotive world and the sliding-in doors were a neat trick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...