Buick35

Vietnam veterans and the old car hobby

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I cleaned up my act in 1978 so it's been almost 42 years since I had a drop to drink nor any illicit drug. At the time, I had nothing left from my pre-Army days. And the only things I still owned from post Army crazy days were two shotguns, two BSA motorcycles, and my 53 Buick Roadmaster pickup. Life has been good since then, leon bee ain't my real name.

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2 hours ago, leon bee said:

I cleaned up my act in 1978 so it's been almost 42 years since I had a drop to drink nor any illicit drug. At the time, I had nothing left from my pre-Army days. And the only things I still owned from post Army crazy days were two shotguns, two BSA motorcycles, and my 53 Buick Roadmaster pickup. Life has been good since then, leon bee ain't my real name.

Glad you made it thru all the turmoil -both Nam and your aftermath. Thumbs Up,Affirm.

Cricket JKJ

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10 hours ago, leon bee said:

 my 53 Buick Roadmaster pickup

 

I wouldn't mind seeing a pic of that. Did you convert it or was it like that when you bought it? Also, congrats on your recovery.... :)

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Came home from SE Asia as a S/Sgt. in 1970 and bought a 1970 Chevy Chevelle  , had it a few weeks and was hit head on by a drunk in a new Impala totaled both cars. Bought a 1969 Mustang 428 SCJ, sold it when I got married. Kids are grown and gone so we now have two 1930 Chrysler Model 70s. Coupe is a show car and the Brougham is an all original driver.

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Smoked little and drank less, either would screw up my major source of income: pool. In the USAF this was serious business.

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I never smoked but always had a pack of Marlboro’s on hand and a lighter. When the Sargent would start looking for guys I always offered one to him. The grunts that didn’t smoke always got pulled for guard duty or some other job that needed to be done. Very seldom did I get pulled from a 10 minute break to do that. 
Learn quick or clean the can ! 

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I bought a new 67 396 SS Chevelle before I left for overseas. After I returned from SEA I bought a 67 427 Corvette Convertible.

It has been a huge rollercoaster of muscle cars and Corvettes ever since.

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Bought my 29 Hupp in 1968 and completely disassembled it to restore it.  After getting married in 69 I was getting drafted so I joined the Navy.  Spent most of my time in Guantanamo and on the USS Saratoga working on radar equipment.  Started family while in GTMO which put the Hupp on hold for almost 50 years.   Been working on it for three years now since retirement and hoping this is the year it becomes drivable.  

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On ‎4‎/‎18‎/‎2020 at 1:11 PM, cricketkj26 said:

I wasnt born until 62 so I was only 10 in 72 when things were pretty much winding down.My father was a flight engineer on a

B24 bomber flying missions over Germany towards the end of WWII. When he came home to Jacksonville FL he went to work for 

the US Navy for 40 yrs repairing aircraft and worked his way up. He was transferred around a good bit and sometimes we lived 

on the navy base where he was stationed or in the local community with military families living all around us,  We were taught 

to respect our country, our flag and most of all the military servicemen and their families.  Bare with me folks  - The last 4 yrs of

Nam and for several years after he was stationed at NAS Cecil Field- a jet base for A4's and A7's that rotated in and out to Vietnam

area carriers. All my friends in the neighbor hood and at the local school had fathers serving over there -either Navy or Marines.

My oldest brother and my sisters husband enlisted and served on the aircraft carrier USS Forrestal  which was deployed over there  

Every night we  watched the local and reports of local and national news  with coverage of Nam - especially for the reports of

of casualties  to local squadrons. Every night Walter Cronkite would give the number of service men killed or wounder that day and

a total for whole duration of the war. We had friends whose dads were never coming home and friends whose dads were being deployed.

 I saw first hand how Vietnam affected families, and even my dad as he lost friends and colleagues. He was always so upset at the 

way all the Vietnam vets were treated.   All that to say what a healthy respect all of us kids in our family has for our all of our service men 

and women that served in the Vietnam war,  The tears are now flowing down onto the keyboard and I am literally crying right now for the 

way alot of Americans treated our Vietnam Vets and for the way many dont appreciate our Armed Service personnel. THANKYOU TO ALL 

OF YOU MEN AND WOMEN WHO HAVE SERVED.  My heart goes out to you with such deep respect.       Now that I Hijacked the topic  -

I would stand there assisting my day while he worked on the cars, trucks, lawn mowers, boat engines, tvs, radios, or any other appliances

that were broke especially for families whose dad was deployed or was killed over there. He could fix anything -mechanical, electrical, 

or electronics. He learned alot of skills in the military and while working for the military. I loved working on cars with him - In turn I learned

to be a Do It Yourself Gearhead and a Shade Tree Mechanic from my US Veteran Father.  He Passed away  and was buried at sea from the  

decks of a US Navy destroyer in the Gulf of Mexico in 1993.   Thankyou to the United States of America US Armed Forces .

To our Vietnam Vets  -WOOYA !! 

 

Sincerely, Kelly Jordan    Lake City ,FL 

1964 Volvo 122S (sold) My first car and restoration 

1967 Mustang Coup

1925 Chrysler G70 2 door Coach 

 

 

The 7-1/2 minute long version comes to mind while reading this: 

Craig

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Interesting choice of good WWII pictures for a Vietnam protest song.

 

Took a few years before I stopped diving for cover every time a firecracker went off.

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16 hours ago, padgett said:

my major source of income: pool. In the USAF this was serious business.

 

An old Navy Corpsman gave me a handful of equagesic pills to help me deal with the petty officer in charge of out fireroom one time. Boy, can you shoot some fluid pool on those!

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My Vietnam vet cousin a multiple Purple Heart recipient wrecked his 68 Camaro by flying it off the road after the war and into a barn. After that he became the Chief of Police in his hometown. 
 

When I grew up in the hobby it was mostly the WWII guys. Now the hobby is dominated by the boomers. The Vietnam vet guys I have met usually have the better cars and the more diverse cars. 

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