1950panhead

Antique cars, this year and beyond, what will happen ?

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12 hours ago, keithb7 said:

I have way more time wrenching on one of my old junkers than I do driving it. It's early in the relationship. We are still getting to know each other...My understanding is my old sedans can't catch covid. When I do go drive them I am in isolation. We have fun. The money I spend brings me happiness. Especially when I am rewarded by being able to drive the old cars. I am rewarded when people wave, or give me a thumbs-up. Or how about the folks that yell at you to get your attention so they can show their appreciation for the old car? When I drive and hit the aoogah horn, kids and adults alike lite-up with grins. At times like these, I really don't care what happens to the value of my cars. I am happy to get back under them, make them a little better, and go out cruising again. 

 

Must be the type cars that I choose to own, that make me feel this way. They aren't anything special. They aren't real valuable or collectable. Must be why I guess I don't ponder their future value. My cars sure bring the smiles from both my face and others, when I pass by. I try to be smart about the money I put into them.  We'll go for ice cream in the Plymouth! My future is seen below here. How utterly boring for some, I know. But I'm having fun!

 

 

IMG_5915.jpg

 

 

Humphrey Bogart drives a Plymouth coupe in a few of his movies.  

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, zepher said:

 

You've obviously never owned a Pierce Arrow.  🤣🤣

 

But some things are better in a Pierce Arrow. 


Everything is better in a Pierce Arrow, and they are XXXXing fantastic in a Duesenberg! ✌️
 

I guess I have made and spent a fortune on antique cars. Way over seven figures. I have traveled the world, have friends in twenty different countries, lived to see and do things my parents and grandparents couldn’t have even imagined. My retirement will suffer dramatically for it. I will probably die working in a garage with a wrench in my hand...........working on a world class machine that still brings me pleasure five decades into my hobby.......which is now also my advocation. Never wasted a dime or misspent an afternoon. My friends I have made over the years we’re ten times more valuable to me than my college degrees. Just before I cash out of this great adventure, I will look back and honestly say it was a life well lived............full of everything I value.........family, friends, and cars. What more is there? Reality is life is very, very short. We are burying my brother-in-law‘s uncle tomorrow, from the virus. A good man gone too soon. Enjoy life while you can..........it’s running away from you at a frighteningly fast pace, and you will be gone before you know it. I’ll worry about all the small BS that life throws at me after I’m dead.........if your going to procrastinate, you might as well put it all off until it doesn’t matter anymore! Stay safe. Enjoy your family and friends, do good work and do it well. Best to all, Ed

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I only have one old car. I have a sentimental attachment to it, and since I intend to keep it forever, the dollar value truly does not matter. Whatever it brings after I'm gone is just found money to my family.  As long as I manage to preserve even just the one old car for posterity, I will feel that I have done my part. And if I ever get to the point that I cannot continue doing that, I will sell it before I go, so that my family does not have to deal with it. A little more or a little less will make no difference at that point, either.

 

If I can ever afford a second hobby car, I have always wanted something much older. But it would have to be relatively modest, and it does not seem likely in the near future anyway. Maybe when the bottom completely drops out of the market, I'll be able to give a good home to one more car. But I'm not counting on it. 

 

 I have never done a full restoration, have never driven anything pre-war, and have never bought any car with the intention of making a profit on it, so my position may not be typical here. But I have done all that with my other hobby, vintage guitars. And I believe a parallel can be drawn. Just like with cars, there was a lot of speculation in this field, and price corrections have left many speculators holding the bag. But the "good stuff" tends to retain its value much better. Back in 1995, I bought an old Japanese guitar for $30, restored it, took it to a guitar show and sold it for $150. At the same show, I bought an older Gibson guitar for $250 (I was quite the wheeler-dealer as I tried to trade up to better gear than I could afford outright). The same Japanese guitar would be worth perhaps $300 today, but the Gibson, at least $1000. Both have gone up in value, both were selling for even more before the 2008 crash, but the price gap between the two has grown much wider. Once upon a time,  a higher-end collectible guitar was not that much more expensive than a low-end one. But today, the better stuff is worth multiples of the cheaper stuff, and would sell faster, too. The $1000 Gibson would sell within a week or two. There's always somebody who wants one if the price is right. The $300 Japanese guitar might take many months to sell until the right buyer comes along. If I wanted to sell it within two weeks like the Gibson, I would have to blow it out at the 1995 price - $150. There's always going to be somebody to take a Pierce-Arrow off your hands for a decent price. A four-door Pontiac, not so much, unless you turn your price back a few decades. 

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Big Beat -  your spot on. 👍

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16 hours ago, Big Beat said:

I only have one old car. I have a sentimental attachment to it, and since I intend to keep it forever, the dollar value truly does not matter. Whatever it brings after I'm gone is just found money to my family.  As long as I manage to preserve even just the one old car for posterity, I will feel that I have done my part. And if I ever get to the point that I cannot continue doing that, I will sell it before I go, so that my family does not have to deal with it. A little more or a little less will make no difference at that point, either.

 

If I can ever afford a second hobby car, I have always wanted something much older. But it would have to be relatively modest, and it does not seem likely in the near future anyway. Maybe when the bottom completely drops out of the market, I'll be able to give a good home to one more car. But I'm not counting on it. 

 

 I have never done a full restoration, have never driven anything pre-war, and have never bought any car with the intention of making a profit on it, so my position may not be typical here. But I have done all that with my other hobby, vintage guitars. And I believe a parallel can be drawn. Just like with cars, there was a lot of speculation in this field, and price corrections have left many speculators holding the bag. But the "good stuff" tends to retain its value much better. Back in 1995, I bought an old Japanese guitar for $30, restored it, took it to a guitar show and sold it for $150. At the same show, I bought an older Gibson guitar for $250 (I was quite the wheeler-dealer as I tried to trade up to better gear than I could afford outright). The same Japanese guitar would be worth perhaps $300 today, but the Gibson, at least $1000. Both have gone up in value, both were selling for even more before the 2008 crash, but the price gap between the two has grown much wider. Once upon a time,  a higher-end collectible guitar was not that much more expensive than a low-end one. But today, the better stuff is worth multiples of the cheaper stuff, and would sell faster, too. The $1000 Gibson would sell within a week or two. There's always somebody who wants one if the price is right. The $300 Japanese guitar might take many months to sell until the right buyer comes along. If I wanted to sell it within two weeks like the Gibson, I would have to blow it out at the 1995 price - $150. There's always going to be somebody to take a Pierce-Arrow off your hands for a decent price. A four-door Pontiac, not so much, unless you turn your price back a few decades. 

 

 

I was very happy when I finally found a Gibson LP Studio for an affordable price. Not vintage , but a 1989 which is a decent year for the post vintage Gibson's. It took many months of watching ebad. I finally found a auction that had a seller with only 2 or 3 feedbacks and poor description / photo's . Took a chance, put in a low ball bid and I am very happy. I probably paid 1/2 or less of what was the going rate at the time {2015}. Even with the current market it is worth at least a couple hundred more than I paid, and I thoroughly enjoy it. Mostly play my 

" partscaster ";  91 Fender USA neck , aftermarket ash body , " noiseless " single coil PU's,  these days , but the LP comes out at least 3 or 4 times each month.

 

Greg

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On 4/17/2020 at 1:55 PM, edinmass said:

Never wasted a dime or misspent an afternoon.

 

Some of my best memories. Maybe it is in my genes.

 

Did I ever write about the five times I put in my two cents?

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The problem with the classic car market is that it undervalues the cars I have and overvalues the cars I want to buy.  Weird how it always works that way. 

 

Seriously, though, I hope everyone is safe and healthy during these crazy times.  Thanks for keeping the hobby alive.

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Moved enough crap to find the back wall of the garage a little while ago. On top of the counter were two boxes of Beanie Babies. New, got them when a lady moved to Florida years ago, market crashed on them the year before I got them. If you are having a bad day or need a good laugh Google Beanie Babies and look at the asking prices being asked by the clueless. 🙂Stay safe. Bob 

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On 4/17/2020 at 9:27 PM, Big Beat said:

.But I have done all that with my other hobby, vintage guitars.. 

 

I hear ya big beat! I bought a Roger McGuiin autographed Rickenbacker 12 string and i feel honored just to be able to touch the same instrument he touched. If someone gave me a choice between one of my cars or that guitar, I think the guitar will win. I still get a strange chill when I take it out of the case

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Spent a lot of time on another hobby: Hickok tube testers and Zenith Transoceanic Radios. Then I realized radios was a strange hobby for someone who is "hearing impaired" (deef as a post) so returned to computers and cars.

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Posted (edited)

I went in an antique guitar store in Kent, Ct. a few years back, just about fell over reading the price tags. Nothing I'll ever run across at a tag sale. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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Well, it's apparent there are a lot of real car guys here who simply enjoy their cars for what they are and the pleasure they provide us in life.  That's far better reading than the too-often seen "doom and gloom" conversations we sometimes see.  Hey-the sun is shining so I think we'll get the Model T out and have a one-car parade up and down our street today to provide a little fun and relief for our friends and neighbors.  Social and Distance are two words that really don't seem to go together naturally!

Terry

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I'm off to look at Pre War car parts that are for sale details at 6:00. Bob 

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Let me know if you find any neat spark plugs Bob.

thanks,

Terry

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Thanks to everyone that posted, I enjoyed reading the comments.

I looked at antique cars and motorcycles for sale today on ebay.

Everything is still priced at pre pandemic levels, very few "no reserve" auctions listed.

 

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Great day for a Sunday drive! Nice sunny day and lots of "collector" cars were out and about. Started with a Chattingham? Lotus 7 clone, then a real nice red MGB right hand Coupe. Next was a gutted NOVA on a rollback, somebody bought or sold or was working on. Nicely built '53 Ford pickup, more MGB's, another NOVA. A sea of bicyclists, and some real bikers. Passed on the parts I went to see, not a time to test the waters on parts I don't think I could flip. Off to do yard work then some more sheetrock removal. Bob 

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Was cleaning the garage, real mess, Had to move the Mg to get the corvette out . Dan and Annette took it out for a ride also had a picnic in the local park .May get one of mine out this week . Need to finish up the new trunk for the 32 chevy. get some pictures when its done . Didn't get any work done on the LaSalle this week ,to nice out side .Grass cutting planting the garden Spring is a coming  King32

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"Everything is still priced at pre pandemic levels, very few "no reserve" auctions listed. " but is anything selling ? That is the real questions.

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Today all the cars got some exercise!  Started with the GTO.  It was a big attraction at the gas station, and turned a lot of heads as I drove through the parking lot in our nearby shopping center to get to the gas pumps.  Two guys in a mini-cooper gave me the thumbs up and said "lay some rubber."  I did.

The MGTC got lots of waves through the neighborhood and I took rain-checks for some rides later, but star attraction was the Model T.  Drove it furthest, through a couple of neighborhoods.  Lots of people out working in the yard, kids playing, even some people tinkering with their cars in the drive-way.  Nearly all the garages were open and some of the stuff that caught my eye was simply amazing.  Saw a lot of older cars tucked away in corners, under blankets, or up on jack-stands with hoods, up, etc. 

 

A real interesting thing happened over at the gas station as I pulled in.  There were a couple of guys there with their street-rods, hoods open, just kicking tires.  Another guy pulled in to show them some parts he had just rescued from an early Ford pickup, probably late 40s.  I pulled up to the group after gassing up, and we literally had an impromptu car-show, with the mini-swap meet included.  We didn't talk about anything except the cars-where we got them, where we've had them, how much work we did on them, etc. etc. etc.  It was a load of fun-complete strangers, drawn together by things with wheels.  From 1914 to 1965.  People at the gas station or driving by stopped to look out their car windows, honk horns, cheer and give us a thumbs up.   It was a great day and made me feel pretty good about this hobby. 

There's a bright light shining!

Terry

Two Ts.jpg

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Posted (edited)

It has become clear to me that when you drive a fun old vintage car, with a smile on, the world really is full of happy people. Even during these unprecedented times that we are dealing with. Every were you turn, people are waving and smiling. Absolute complete strangers approach you to talk and ask questions about the old car that you're in. Your old car brightens their day. Their mind immediately seems to jump back to a simpler time. Most everyone looks at the old days as a better time than today. The old car takes them there instantly. After covid, I will still be found out cruising. Meeting new people. Talking about my old cars. Enlightening the masses that old vintage cars are great hobby, like no other. Spreading good, happy feelings.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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I would rather be in my garage for a couple of hours than watching foreign speaking reporters in some politician's garden. And that's what I do while planning where the next car is going.

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Posted (edited)

Two Ts.jpg

Terry, There can't be a lot of light blue MG-TC's with chrome wire wheels, was your car ever owned by Chris Jenson here in Connecticut? Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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No, it was imported from England by one of our club members locally.  He had it restored and first showed it here in the late 70s.  We fell in love with it and eventually Susan had the chance to purchase it.  It's had some upgrades including the chrome wires, finned aluminum brake drums, and some performance improvements that are not readily visible.  It goes!   She's the "MG-Girl" around here and she'll quickly let everyone know they are hers!  I just get to keep them clean.  I usually am the navigator and sometimes I pretend like I'm driving, then suddenly throw my hands up in the air or pretend like I'm sleeping.  Freaks out others who don't notice where the steering wheel is.  Fun car.

Terry

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