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I just hate seeing these "as new" children's bikes going to the "crusher' along with all the other junk. 

I am sure that one of our grand childrens friends will be happy to give it a home.  I  think that I can afford to spend $20 if necessary,

All I need to do is to find an "online Bicycle shop" that can supply a tyre and inner tube for a Kid's bike".

This one looks as if it has been ridden around the block once. There is barely even a scratch on it.

It has not even had enough use as to make it dirty.

 

Bernie j.

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Hello again

We have just come in from our (almost) daily after lunch walks, While out I have picked up yet another "As New" 24 in wheel, boy's "Mountain Bicycle".

This one has 18 speed gears, front and rear suspension and front and rear hand brakes. There is not even any sign of wear on the brake "blocks". DSCN6984.thumb.jpg.bfe132062aeb6011f48d47c98937917a.jpgDSCN6985.thumb.jpg.0be47bbb4984057f96ac13c4a81c6593.jpg

Just a little scratching on the paint in one or two places. Otherwise "as new".   In fact after closer examination thye scratches are in fact not scratches but part of the colour scheme with the apparent scratches transfers carefully applied to make it look "used".

From picking it up to place it into the Peugeots boot (trunk) I quickly became aware just why children do not want to ride these Bicycles. They are just far too heavy for an 8 or 10 year old to push up hills. 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Bernie,

 

Sounds like you have a serial bike thief in your neighborhood.  Takes any available bike and rides it as much as s/he wants and then abandons it. Not uncommon in the States. If there are serial numbers on the bikes, your local gendarmes may have a report that would allow you to return them to their rightful owners.

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Thanks for the warning.

In this case at least the Bike was included in a pile of other "Hard Garbage" put out in a pile for the Local Council Garbage Collection team to pick up.

What I object to is that the collection truck has a "Compactor Function" that crushes everything thrown in ready to go to "land fill". Anything and everything is totally destroyed in the process.

 

Bernie j.

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Yes I remember that at the time we were amazed. I can assure you that to the very best of our knowledge there was no connection between that truck &or trailer with "LAG"-onda.

It is just typical of the surprises in store for people brave enough to drive their 80 plus year old cars on European Roads. You should try it some time. We enjoy every moment. Our cruising speed is very much the same as many of these large freight carrying trucks. About 60 mph or 100 kph.

 

Bernie j.

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With our present Covid Lock-down I have resisted the temptation to take the Rapier out for a quick dash around the neighbourhood. But today I did start it up and let it run at a fast tick-over until it was warmed up. I then gave it a dust off and a general tidy up before putting  the tonneau cover back on. Perhaps next time I can take it down the road to the bottom of the hill, always remembering that we have a strict limit of no more than 5 Kms from home.

 

Bj.

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Your lockdown prevents drives in cars? Even in total lock down here in Southern Florida, they expressly allowed going for drives.........it’s good for ones mental health. There should be zero risk as long as you don’t stop. I don’t know if your in the city or country, but there must be a road that is off the beaten path so you can have some enjoyable drive without any issues. I took our old car to the grocery store.......got lots of waves. We are now just about open 100 percent. Folks over fifty are doing fine....as they follow all the rules........and it seems everyone is 100 percent compliant with mask and distance..........the younger generation are having a tough go of it.......taking too many risks......and are now 90 percent of all new cases. Please stay safe, but if possible do drive your car.......it’s the best medicine. Ed

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Thank you edinmass

I am just like everyone else, going through some withdrawal symptoms. I have sold the Renault but it canot be collected until the interstate buyer is permitted to travel.

Meanwhile I am tidying up some overdue negelected jobs.

I have just ordered a windscreen washer pump (online) so I can replace the dead one in the Peugeot. In addition to being a "Roadworthy Item" is just makes life that little bit easier having one that works. 

I really hope to start the process of buying back the Three Litre Lagonda Special, I sold "almost finished" a very long time ago.

 

I need to be able to travel arcoss town, to be able to identify the actual house where it has been hiding untouched for all those years.

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hello again, It is now three days later and very little has changed, In order to stop me from going totally mad this afternoon I have dismantled a "Clear Hooter" an after market version of the Lucas Altette horn, After checking it using a battery charger as a source of 12 volts, It is now working and I am waiting for the paint to dry before I put it back on the shelf along with other (potentially) "useful parts".  See previous post, I still am living in the hope that I may be able to buy this potentially "interesting" car back but until our "lock-down" is lifted there is very little I can do.  I cannot remember exactly what went with this (project) car when I sold it some years ago. While a little bit weird, this is probably the best of the unfinished projects that I need to investigate re it's availability. That it is so close and yet so far away tends to be frustrating. There "aint nuffing" I can do right now so again I still need some advanced lessons in being patient! Of course as I have probably said a million times on as many similar occasions, all I can do is to keep smiling!

 

Bj.

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Bernie,

 

Seems like you are still stuck in limbo, probably driving you (and your wife) a bit crazy. Keep smiling and keep finding projects.  Mine right now is sending emails to 2700 registered voters asking for their support.  A lot less fun than refurbishing a Lucas Altette horn.

 

Our county is still in California's "purple" status (our governor came up with color codes for Covid recovery status), which means we cannot have any indoor dinning, drinking, etc. We are able to order out.  And, while we do not have the travel limitations you have, which I believe are wise, you still do not want to travel anywhere.  A friend of ours visited her daughter who lives 75 miles away. When she got back, ended up getting tested twice for coronavirus. Thankfully she was, ultimately, negative.

 

Smoke and hot weather has kept my TD grounded so, like you, I wander down to the garage occasionally to sit in it.

 

Cheers!

 

Charlie Duffy

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Hiya all 

Hopefully I have got one step closer to being able to track down the "other old lag" !  

With the lock down boundaries being slightly relaxed, I may be able to investigate the present where-abouts of the Lagonda 3 Litre Special I sold quite a few years ago. It is so close and yet so far away but I hope to start some detective work in the next week or two. I believe that virtually nothing has been done to it since it left my garage doors.all those years ago. Meanwhile I still have the Renault taking up my spare garage space, so as with so many others, I need to take care not to trip over the boxes of loose parts or to knock my head climbing over the car.  

Really it is not quite that bad and it gives me an even better to tidy up my Garage/work space.  I am also slowly adding to my "Restoration Fund" having just sold a Book on Packards  1920 -1958.  I really do need to go through my book shelves and see how many of the others I have not opened in the last 20 years, are sitting there "mouldering away".

 

Bj.

 

I have just discovered I already have a very faded copy of Lagonda in the 1930s.

I was almost tempted to buy another copy on e-bay and having looked at again, I am glad that I have saved my money.

Lagonda iin the 1930s.jpeg

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Looking on my bookshelf, I find that I have most of the Important Lagonda Books published in the past 50 or 60 years. 

Including the Davey & May "History of the Marque". Probably the most comprehensive book ever written on Lagondas.

 

If I start re-reading them all I may just live long enough to finish them.

Looking a little deeper I find that I still have four or five (run-on) copies of "Ever Keen", (216 pages)  still sitting in a box underneath my desk, should anyone like to obtain an autographed copy.  (Aust $35  plus post.)

 

1556912611_EverKeen.jpeg.346b40efc5b46408094e56b046787895.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Here we are still locked into a quasi lockdown, we are now permitted to travel up to 25 kms from our front door but we must have a valid reason for the travel. Right now not having an urgent need to go anywhere I am as good as locked in.  I do still have to make one trip that may stretch the distance travelled by a mile or two in order to collect the Renault gearbox so it will be ready to go with the car after the buyer has paid the balance of the purchase price. So far he has only paid a deposit (half) and is due to pay the balance before he collects it in two weks time. This was not really an arrangement I would choose to make. In my terms if you want to buy a car you pay for it and take it away. Under our current lock down this was not possible so rightly or wrongly I agreed to accept a deposit and to hold it until it was possible for the (interstate) purchaser to come and collect it.

Under my self imposed rules I cannot buy the next project car* until after the Renault has gone. 

* Hopefully this will be another Lagonda, a "special"  that I sold (unfinished) about 15-20 years ago. From all accounts it has languished untouched for most if not all that time and deserves to be completed. From memory it still needs some work done on the (SS Jaguar) rear axle before it can be fitted. 

As you can see from the attached photographs the rebuild was well advanced when I sold it all those years ago.

That and from what I have been told it has not progressed at all since I sold it is of some concern to me and something I feel that I should make some attempt to rectify. Hopefully I may have something more to add on this subject in the foreseeable future.  Meanwhile I am filling in some of my time removing some of the dust that has accumulated on parts of the Lagonda Rapier. This despite the fact that it has not been outside our front gate.

 

1567002889_3LitreLagonda1.jpeg.2a9ef9a6012efe6b94fed2492399aeaa.jpeg

 

199991905_3LitreLag-Austin12.thumb.jpg.9abbfcb606ec9134d0c967c59f7fc918.jpg.7506bff4330f8b7174d565846dd33f41.jpgDSCN7060.thumb.jpg.ac055aad15668d793b0511e3491f8545.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Thank you Dr Data, just one problem, My mother weaned me off milk about 75 years ago. If I still was eating cereals I may have had a splash or two on those but it is too late even for that.  I am all grown up now I am facing my 84 birthday in just a week or two. I have noted that it is almost due for an oil change so I will have to take it out for a drive around the block one or twice to warm it up before then. How to dispose of the two gallons of used engine oil will be the next problem.  If I leave this for a couple of weeks untafter the dreaded Renault has finally gone. I could perhaps take it out when I go to look for my next Project. Hopefully the 3 Litre Lagonda Special I sold unfinished about 15 to 20 years ago. According to my spies it has not progressed since then and is hiding in a garage not more than 25 kms away.691225655_3LitreLag-Austin12.thumb.jpg.b5e6394df9fc1735bccbc9f174bd2e46.jpg1741295639_3LitreLagonda.jpeg.d966ae990e3d3ca9d789323991866748.jpeg

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While hopefully you are all managing to avoid contact with the Covid 19 Virus perhaps we should remember that there have been far worse "plagues"

 

In August 1665 Alexander Hadfield, the local tailor in Eyam, ordered a bale of cloth from London to make into clothes for the villagers, thus triggering a chain of events that led to the death of some 260 villagers and the destruction of some 76 families, more than a quarter of the total population

His death was soon followed by that of his two stepsons, an immediate neighbour and then the tailor himself. By the end of September five people from the village had died. In October 23 more perished. It soon became clear that the plague had established itself in the village. Many of the villagers immediately thought about fleeing to Sheffield, the nearest big city, but they were persuaded to unite behind their rector, the young and newly arrived Rev William

an estimated 100,000 people - almost a quarter of London's population - in 18 months. The village of Eyam lies around 260 kilometres from

London, so how does it fit into this apocalyptic picture?

. The cloth arrived in Eyam at the beginning of September. Finding the cloth

damp and smelling foul’’, Hadfield’s assistant, George Viccars, spread it in front of the fire to

air, thus awakening and activating the rat fleas that had travelled with it. By 7th September he

was dead. The plague had arrived in Eyam.

Mompesson. He argued that their arrival in Sheffield would risk countless more lives when the north had not suffered as much as London had. Instead they should quarantine themselves, allowing nobody to enter or leave the village  fully knowing that they could all die.

Mompesson was an intelligent, educated man having graduated from Cambridge University 10 years earlier and showed a remarkable understanding of how to deal with their situation. He established a four point plan and persuaded the villagers to agree to it: a

families were ordered to bury their dead in their own plots, not the church burial ground; he also suspended church services, to avoid

parishioners being crammed into church pews, allowing only open-air gatherings where social distancing could be observed; because the village was not self-sufficient they relied on donations of food supplied by those who lived outside Eyam. Arrangements were therefore made for food to be left at the parish stone that marked the entrance to the village where the villagers, in turn, would leave money in a water trough that Mompesson ordered to be filled with vinegar to sterilise the coins.

The Boundary Stone and trough can still be seen.

resident was allowed to pass it. Signs were erected along the line to warn travellers not to enter

Cordon Sanitaire or

quarantine was established. This line went around the outskirts of the village and no Eyam

and during the time of the quarantine there were almost no attempts to cross the line, even at

the peak of the disease in the summer of 1666;

Each year, on the last Sunday of August, a ceremony is held in Eyam to remember the victims of

the plague. The cottages where whole families perished are still there, many with heart-

wrenching plaques documenting the domestic tragedies which took place within their walls:

For some families there is not even a plaque. Such is the case with

Elizabeth Hancock - an Eyam

plague survivor  who afterwards told

the story of how she buried six of her children and her

husband one after another in a period of just 8 days. She had to drag their bodies across the

fields and bury them while people from the nearby villages stood on the hills and just watched,

being too scared to help.

The story of Eyam resonates with the whole world today in a way that I never imagined possible

when I last visited Eyam. I also remember first going there as a schoolboy, on a school visit over

half a century ago. The events of that terrible plague year seemed to me then as remote as

1066 or the murderous Viking invasions of earlier centuries. Never could I have foreseen that

one day I would witness the same epidemiological measures in operation that the far-sighted

and visionary William Mompesson had initiated nearly 400 hundred years ago.

The story of Eyam therefore is one of astonishing courage, sacrifice and selflessness. The

villagers sacrificed their lives because they understood what had to be done in order to stop the

spread of the disease and to protect as many of their fellow human beings as possible. Our own

current pandemic is not asking us to make the ultimate sacrifice, although there have been

plenty of examples of that amongst front-line health workers in Melbourne, but reflecting on

the events that took place in this picturesque village all those years ago helps me to put into a

sober perspective the essentially petty sacrifices that we, in our turn, are being asked to make.

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Meanwhile our "Co-vid 19 Lockdown" has been eased slightly, so I may be able to go and do a "letter box drop" in the street where I believe that the Three Litre Lagonda "Special" is residing. The Renault is finally to be collected some time in the next week or two which should "clear the decks".

All I need to do then is to avoid any unnecessary complications and hope that my aspriations re the Three Litre actually come to pass. Failing that I am sure that there are any number of orphans waiting out there, impatient to be rescued.

There is one possible little 1928 Morris (8hp) that is currently for sale at the "other end of the country" which means that it may as  well be in China.

 

Bj.

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Here it is Sunday afternoon here in Australia. This morning aided by an old friend who can remember the Three Litre Lagonda Special being delivered to a street no mor than half a mile from his home, I did the proposed "Letter box drop" so now I have to be patient and wait to see if I will have encouraged any replies. With this in mind I have been through my "useful bin" and unearthed four Bonnet ( Hood) hold down latches. Two of these will require new "hooks" to be made out of some 5/16 inch square bar. Not that I even know at this stage, even if I do fond the car I will be able to buy it.

Walking down the "target" street, almost every second house seemed to have a garage with doors that looked as though they had not been opened for many years. Fingers crossed, or just wishful thinking?

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Hello Frank

I have not given up yet I have had no replies to my "letter box drop" which is disappointing but not entirely unexpected. I am about to do an email request for further information to the local Lagonda Club members but again will be surprised to learn anything new. 

 

 

Bernie j.

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Life goes on although I have a horrible feeling that this is going nowhere. at least the sale of the Renault is progressing with the balance of the money now in my bank and the interstate buyer organising to have the car collected early next week.  Some time after that I can start thinking about a replacement and if I really do need one.

These projects have a nasty habit of comming back and haunting me.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I am still waitingfor the Renault to be collected but it is due to be collected (at last) tomorrow. I really do need to intensify my search for the Lagonda Three Litre "Special". I have not received any replies to my letter box drop so I may have to go and knock on some doors. It does not seem to have moved since I sold it some 15+ years ago. Now that we are finally out of our "Covid Lockdown" I can go and make another start on my search. 
I am still convinced that it has to be hiding somewhere not very far away.

 

Bj.

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I really do need to keep myself in check. Now that the Renault project has "gone" than I find myself looking at a new project This time another Singer based Basket case.  Before I even consider this I must go and have one more try at finding the Lagonda Three Litre "special".

At this point I should say that I am still not sure if I want to go and knock on doors but I cannot see any other way of finding out if the car is still around.

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Meanwhile the Singer "Basket Case" is hovering in the back-ground.

I have compiled at "shopping list" for the vendor to work on. When you look at this it may be becoming serious.

 

19?? Singer Basket case.

 

Chassis frame

Front and rear axles 

5 wheels. c/w wheel nuts

2 front and 2 rear springs

4 x Shock absorbers

Brake master cylinder and 4 x wheel cylinders + fittings. 

Steering box c/w steering wheel

Motor complete with manifolds and carby.

Starter and Generator. 

Gearbox, clutch and tail shaft. 3 or 4 sped?

Distributor and ign coil.

Radiator c/w chrome shell.

Dash board instruments and switches.

Head lights, side & tail lights.

Front bucket seats. 

Bonnet with catches

Petrol Tank Filler cap etc

          Pump & Pipework.

Brake Master cylinder, and 4 x Wheel cylinders

4 x Backing plates etc

4 x Brake drums and 8 x shoes

 

Body (Optional)

Doors c/w hinges and latches. 

Boot lid “    “             “     “

Windscreen frame and fittings.

Hood frame. side screens.

 

Any paper-work, history or manuals etc.

Any photographs. (As is).

 

Bernie j.

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Bernie,

 

I would pursue the Lagonda Three Litre "Special" before jumping on (into?) the Singer project.  Go knock on doors...the worst that can happen is people say "no" or don't know what you are talking about.  You might be surprised at what you find.

 

I was rather sad to see the Renault get hauled away.  Your work on it was really amazing.  I was hoping to see it running.

 

Good luck in your quest.

 

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Thank you Frank

I think that the Singer project may have just fallen over, the vendor (seller) has just sent me an email to say that he cannot find half the stuff he was thinking of selling to me. This means that hopefully I can go on the hunt for the Lagonda this coming weekend or at leasr "some time soon".. Please keep your fingers crosed for me. Perhaps I have already done my last Singer project. For now I am still a member of the Singer Car Club.  Perhaps I should be saving my money for one last trip to France BUT, the whole Corvid Virus "thing" tends to put me off any long distance travel.

I have a deal with the Medical department of our local University that they will take my body for students to practice cutting up my various interesting bits. So I should not be too far from home when that happens (but not for a few more years). The good thing is that it saves my family a whole lot of money on funeral expenses. They just toss the left over bits into a bin to go to the incinerator once they have finished with it/them/me....

 

Bj..

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501441_SunbeamTalbot10.jpeg.fe302ed0dc4d05335cb0d0f18f0b795f.jpeg

 My big conundrum is, Do I really need another project? I am now 84 year old so do I need another "toy" to play with. I am concerned that I do not seem to ever finish projects, even the unfinished ones that I buy back in the hope of finishing. Right now I cannot decide exactly what sort of project I want to buy. I always fall back onto the theory that the project/car finds me....  I know that just the size of my garage/work space limits the size of the car to something smaller. I really do not want another Austin Seven or an MG, like wise I do not want to buy another Fiat either Vintage or Modern.  Now I wonder if I should move away from Vintage and on to the 1940s or 50s. Perhaps another Sunbeam Talbot, a make I had a run of when I was in my 20s and before we were married. If I could find another Sunbeam Talbot 10 hp Drop Head Coupe it could be interesting. Perhaps IF I wait long enough something will "Just Appear"?  We will just have to wait and see!

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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 Perhaps IF I wait long enough something will "Just Appear"?  We will just have to wait and see!  

The one problem with this theory is, I am not getting any younger so there is a sense of urgency. Having said that, I also need to narrow my choice! 

No more French cars, No more Italian cars, no more 1930 or 40s cars. Definitely no "Post war" cars!  That certainly narrows the field. The other limitation is that I will only take on Projects that I know that I will finish!   That and that I will not become impatient and will wait for the "right" project to appear.  Right now I am working my way through my copy of "Cumshaw and Horrobin's Complete Catalogue of British Cars".

This really is a "Must have" for anyone with an interest in any British made motor cars.  

To any Australian readers of this post, I need your help in discovering my next project.

 

Bernie j.

 

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  • 1 month later...

i have not done one of these exercises for some time. For the benefit of any new comers to this thread I have taken a couple of minutes to present these five reasons why I continue to be so enthusiastic about my 1934 Lagonda Rapier. a car I have owned since 1976.DSCN7124.thumb.jpg.3deac3f22ce811a29f58ef60581efeb1.jpgDSCN7128.thumb.jpg.479492adbd84ace8f6d483556ff5d32c.jpgDSCN7126.thumb.jpg.5db37464969d01a6248041a9dd6b4569.jpgDSCN7125.thumb.jpg.d8553c2530ef237c026378f86b5c5b40.jpgDSCN7127.thumb.jpg.10c44d3025fc8b9e62c9830f6b7d9e7d.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...

Oops, you have to move your focus to look under French Cars, The Dreaded 1921 Citroen chassis that was dropped on my front door step seems to have grown roots. I  am now looking for some sort of engine and gearbox to put into it. All or any suggestions are welcome. 

 

Bj.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Oh dear! Oh Dear!

It seems as though nothing I do is of any interest to any of the sophisticated people who accidently look in here. I think that the time has come for me to gracefully depart and leave the AACA members to find their own much more fascinating entertainment!

(4 cylinder Dodge Brothers, Model A Fords and Chev "4", two out of the three really boring side valves? All the dreaded "Black Iron").

I really do despair when not one person can find anything (Good or bad) to say about my Lagonda Rapier or anything else that I write about 

When it was first built in 1934, Any Twin Overhead Cam engine with 2 SU carbs was considered  just a little bit special, when coupled to a close ratio ENV 75 Preselector gearbox it was even more so. Add some very special brakes, the first to stop any car from 30 mph in less than 30 ft.

Now add some "Razor sharp" steering and you have package that left the other cars way behind. Under 1500cc and near enough to 100 mph fully road equipped with two people on board? Not good enough??

Why do I bother?

I know that it is undoubtedly the BEST medium sized British SPORTS CAR built in the 1930s !

That there were less than 500 ever built does tend to make it just a little bit exclusive!

927748964_AndIstillwearCheckshirts.....jpeg.1d6b2cb74201f0548671f2e1c015ffb7.jpeg AND I still wear chequered shirts more that 80 years later!

Bye

Bj.

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hi Bernie, Definitely not a car sophisticate, or even someone who can check their own oil, but the little lady that lives with me has been following your antics since the day you posted that you were going to take a nap under your car. Since I found your first posting with pictures of the Rapier in the outback, there hasn't been a day that I've looked at the AACA forum without spinning the screen all the way to the bottom to see what you've been up to and  everytime she sees me looking at this forum, she asks what the old guy who sleeps under his car is up to.  Occasionally I have been able to add something useful to your postings and  I don't know if this kind of interest is the kind of interest you were wondering about, but the little lady thinks your little boy picture is "so cute". 

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On December 3rd last year Dr Data said "I would pursue the Lagonda Three Litre "Special" before jumping on (into?) the Singer project.  Go knock on doors...the worst that can happen is people say "no" or don't know what you are talking about.  You might be surprised at what you find."

 

I hope that it is not too late to make a fresh start!   First I must divest myself of the collection of 1919-21 Citroen 10hp "Bits" that are cluttering up my Garage/work space. With luck some Citroen enthusiast will decide that it is just what he wants/needs. 

 

Bernie j.

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I do hate these one sided conversations, It is a little like an email I received this morning from an unknown "someone"

 

Do you still want to buy a gearbox?

 

How would you reply to that?

It is a bit like a question on a schoolboys exam paper. 

"Who and when wrote the poem "Kubler Kahn"? and in how many words?"

 

Bernie j.

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31 minutes ago, oldcar said:

I do hate these one sided conversations, It is a little like an email I received this morning from an unknown "someone"

 

Do you still want to buy a gearbox?

 

How would you reply to that?

It is a bit like a question on a schoolboys exam paper. 

"Who and when wrote the poem "Kubler Kahn"? and in how many words?"

 

Bernie j.

There was a poem? I remember the name from history and even seen the movie, but I never knew there was a poem.

As for replying to the overly broad gear box question, you can always ask which  flavor?

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No! Actually I replied with a quotation from Kubla Kahn :-"And all should cry, Beware Beware!"

 

 

 

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
   Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round;
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.
 
But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover!
A savage place! as holy and enchanted
As e’er beneath a waning moon was haunted
By woman wailing for her demon-lover!
And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced:
Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst
Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher’s flail:
And mid these dancing rocks at once and ever
It flung up momently the sacred river.
Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean;
And ’mid this tumult Kubla heard from far
Ancestral voices prophesying war!
   The shadow of the dome of pleasure
   Floated midway on the waves;
   Where was heard the mingled measure
   From the fountain and the caves.
It was a miracle of rare device,
A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice!
 
   A damsel with a dulcimer
   In a vision once I saw:
   It was an Abyssinian maid
   And on her dulcimer she played,
   Singing of Mount Abora.
   Could I revive within me
   Her symphony and song,
   To such a deep delight ’twould win me,
That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome! those caves of ice!
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware! Beware!
His flashing eyes, his floating hair!
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise.
Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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