Sign in to follow this  
Mark Gregory

Stirling Moss British racing legend dies at 90

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
 

Sir Stirling Moss dies aged 90 after a long illness: Dashing British motor racing legend passes away at his Mayfair home as his wife Lady Moss reveals he 'died as he lived, looking wonderful'

  • Racing legend Sir Stirling Moss died at the age of 90 in the early hours of Easter morning 
  • His wife, Lady Moss, said 'it was one race too many' after he died at central London home
  • Moss's style, skill and versatility won him 212 of his 529 races in every conceivable kind of car 

 

Moss' 1961 Monaco victory is the Formula One victory he considers the finest of his career

 

 

 

Moss on his way to winning the Italian Mille Miglia Race in 1955 - his most famous ever drive

Edited by Mark Gregory (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He was certainly one of my heroes....

Sterling Moss.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another legend gone -but he will always remain a legend. 

Terry

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the great pleasure of talking to him in Manhattan at a meeting of the International Motor Press Association held at Mama Leone's restaurant about 40 years ago. He was in N.Y. City for the NY Auto show as a guest and came to the IMPA meeting by invitation. All the other people in the room were in conversation and seated for lunch and I was up at one of the portable bars they had set up in a corner, well Mr. Moss walked in and over to the bar without anyone noticing - so I said hello and then mentioned I had just read an interesting article in the British Motor Sport magazine where he commented on his opinions on pre war race cars he had been able to drive shortly before that had been arranged by the Motor Sport magazine editors. He was thrilled to discuss that! Not his career or wins but what a pre war race car drove like! ( cars that he read about during his youth) We must have talked for about 10 - 15 minutes and then parted to go to our respective tables. I got back to where I was sitting and my friends there ( Austin CLark and David Hebb who was head of Briitish Leyland PR in the USA at the time) asked "where the hell did you disappear to" so I told them   I believe that Jackie Stewart the race car driver was there too at that meeting and everyone was focused on him.

Stiriing Moss was an ok guy, very cordial in conversation and I found out especially so when not being in the primary spotlight /limelight . He was a true car enthusiast and just a down to earth car guy.

Walt

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm like most who followed the international racing scene since the 50's, Stirling Moss was the epidemy of class, stature, realism and success, on and off the track. Among the last of a generation of true drivers who drove for the love of the sport and not just for big paydays.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He was a great guy and a true gentleman. I was fortunate to meet him and talk with him on several occasions. If I am not mistaken, his son is a member here on this site. Ed

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In respect for Mr Moss you could attempt to correct the spelling of his name in the title of this thread.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He was a guest of honor at the Fall Festival at Lime Rock a few years ago, I'm sure he drove something around, just don't remember what. His father raced a Fronty-Ford in the 1924 INDY 500. Bob 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was my hero as a kid. Except for Dan Gurney most drivers were like astronauts: short. Is that Denis Jenkinson in the Merc ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, padgett said:

Is that Denis Jenkinson in the Merc ?

 

Yes. 1955 Mille Miglia which they won setting an all time record.   -   Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW think MM was with an 300SLR  with the desmo engine, ja ? Can't see if lower vents are there but this looks more like a street car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

No, this is Jenks (and Moss) in the 300SLR at the 1955 Mille Miglia...one of the greatest drives in history!  Denis Jenkinson's book The Racing Driver is worth reading for the Moss anecdotes alone, but it's an intelligent discussion of what it takes to be the best in that field.  

this-is-why-sir-stirling-moss-mille-miglia-record-is-unbeaten-1476934630193.jpg

Edited by Aaron65 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Sorry, guys. Right. Not the Gullwing. Was thinking of the picture of the hay-baled 300 SLR. And yes, that is powered by a straight 8 with desmodromic valves. Same as in the W196, but bored out from 2.5 liters to 3. I got to see a W196 at The Pete' 4 or 5 years ago. Hard to pull myself away from it.

 

I enjoyed Jenkinson's book very much  when I read it many years ago. The preparation and teamwork involved for the MM !! 

 

When I was young, I read to learn what I could in order to be able to drive fast, and faster. Went out and practiced on a Go-kart. Then, a bit older, in  my race prepared XK 120 MC, and the very different, classically Italian oversteering, Colloti framed Maserati 3500. Great thrill to put it in a drift on Pirelli Cinturato HS, with opposite lock, tail out, steering with the throttle. Later served me well on long distance driving where time was of the essence. Some in this country, also Europe and Latin America. Somewhere I read that Sir Stirling figured a racing driver should hang up his driving gloves at a rather young age. But I can't remember what age that was. I believe 30, or somewhere in the 30s. Said it was a concentration thing. As an old man, my ability to concentrate is seriously degraded. Reflexes are great, but the phenomenal concentration and awareness needed at speed has been gone for a long time. At this stage of life, I don't drive my fast cars fast, I can't, but I really like to drive slowly in my slow cars.

 

Yes, Sir Stirling Moss was a hero and an inspiration to so many of his generation, and ours. R.I.P.      -    Carl 

 

 

Edited by C Carl
Add tires on the Maserati (see edit history)
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this