Sign in to follow this  
stretch cab

Early Chevy Rear Brakes

Recommended Posts

I have a question for you experts: the hub in the picture is of course the rear. I am guessing that the rear-end is before 1919 Chevy but I do not know.  At about 4 o'clock in the picture you see a rectangular bracket that is part of the external brake band.  The bracket goes over a bracket that is part of the hub backing plate.  There is a hole in the brake band and a corresponding hole in the bracket.  Does this brake band get attached solid with a simple bolt or is there some type of adjustable bolt?  As you can see at about 9 o'clock there is an elaborate adjusting system.  So I'm thinking that the brake band and the bracket get a simple bolt just to hold that side of the band in place.  What say you?

 

Also, I have been trying to get into the VCCA website to ask some questions there.  I guess I have lost my log in info and have tried to reregister.  I get to the point of VCCA sending me a new password by email but it never comes.  Does anyone know if this site is up and working?

Read brake.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

Not quite a simple bolt here is a couple of pictures from my 1926 Chev manual. But you can make a bolt work but it has to allow the brake band move in to clamp down on the drum. The arrangement there looks like it is after 1923 as I have a the remains of a 23 and it’s different. 

4095C5FD-0886-41D6-BB7F-64884ED325E6.jpeg

EEBC7B4E-B25E-4A23-BFF5-1E964D652427.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. There is suppose to be a spring in there to keep it away from the drum when you are NOT applying the brake. When you apply the brake it will move forward and snug the brake band around the drum. Dandy Dave! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I have a 1919 Chevrolet shop manual that covers all 490, FA, FB, and Model T models. This is a picture of the FB brake which seems to be basically the same for all models. It's definitely different from your setup.What are you actually working on ?

Jim

Chevrolet FB brakes.jpg

Edited by J.H.Boland (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like I might be getting close to understanding what I need with you help.  As you can see in the first picture the car is a homebuilt.  Over in the restorations forum of this site I have more information under Grandpa's Car.  You can see the elliptical spring in the first picture.  I was told that the chassis/running gear was early Chevy but not sure what year.

The middle picture is the rear before I painted it.  The last picture is the restored rear.  The long skinny rods are brake actuators.

I'm sure I have the parts that came off the brake bands saved, I'm just not sure what they look like and there is the possibility that they were not correct when my grandfather put this car together.

Thanks so much for your help!

20121020_121839.jpg

20150105_163359.jpg

6.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own a '21 490 Chevy. I looked up your other post on Grandpa's car. It appears to me that you may have a '23 or '24 Chevy Superior chassis. The wheels have steel felloes,which were introduced in late 1922. I will check tomorrow to see if I have a parts book that covers these models.

Jim

Quote

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

all Chevrolet models of that era had 1/4 elliptic springs

Only the 490 had quarter elliptic springs.  the Superior had semi elliptic.

There is a post under pre-war Buick about making this bolt and spring shown in fig. 84.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Yes, The bolt will go in the middle of the spring to keep it centered. Not Chevy in particular, but the same basic principals apply to all. The bolt acts as an adjustment and is locked with a nut, or cotter. This gets adjusted so that the band is just off of the drum. The reason is so that you don't have to push the brake that far to take up the space that is there without the adjustment. The spring will compress when the brake is applied to tighten around the drum, and return when you take you foot off of the brake.  Dandy Dave!  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the comments on the brakes.

 

I helped my late father-in-law restore a 1924 Chevrolet.  The 1923 & 24 Chevrolet Superiors had Quarter elliptic springs, starting in 1925 they had Semi ellipticals.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the help.  I will dig down through all the bolts I have left over and see if I can't find the one shown in the picture.  I did find two springs that look about the right size in my nuts and bolts so maybe I am on to something.

 

On a side note, does the fill hole in the differential cover go towards the top or bottom?  It will fit either direction. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this