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Eaglekiller

Land of Ethanol, California

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Out here in California all our gas has 10% Ethanol, you can get non but its a pain and pricey. I just purchased a car from Louisiana but my guess is it has getting non ethanol gas. 

From what I can find any newer rubber fuel line hose can handle Ethanol, i think.

Do I just need to replace all the rubber sections of my fuel lines? 

Is it something I must do immediately?

Anything else fuel additives that I should consider?

Just wanted to see if anyone else has gone through this, Appreciate any suggestions

 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

It has been my experience living with ethanol that if you keep it moving through the system you won't have many problems. It's when it sits and really gets a chance to work on the various coatings and castings that trouble starts. Any fuel pump or carburetor rebuild kit from the past 10-15 years should be ethanol resistant and modern fuel lines, too. I wouldn't worry too much about pre-emptively repairing anything since it may or may not go bad. We've had trouble with gas tank lining chemicals being eaten by modern gas, so keep an eye on your tank and be prepared to re-seal it if it starts to come undone. It wouldn't hurt to replace your rubber fuel lines, and if you can do it in metal I'd recommend that instead of more rubber. Factory fuel systems only used rubber in flex areas like between the frame and the fuel pump, but along the chassis it should all be metal and the less rubber you have, the less likely you'll have a problem. 

 

Drive your car regularly and I bet you don't have problems. Let it sit with ethanol gas in it and all kinds of stuff can go sideways. Address the issues when they arise and use ethanol-resistant parts and eventually the problem will be a non-issue.

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It’s incredibly difficult to find non-ethanol gas in many places. I would bet that your car was getting it all the time in Louisiana.

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1 hour ago, 39BuickEight said:

It’s incredibly difficult to find non-ethanol gas in many places. I would bet that your car was getting it all the time in Louisiana.

 

Other posts above give good advise about replacing the rubber parts in the fuel system with modern materials. Not a bad idea and I recommend it too. I also agree with 39BuickEight, your car has probably been running on ethanol gas anyway.

 

I used to complain about California gas. But a few years back I drove my '33 Plymouth to Arizona for a meet. It was spring so the temperatures weren't too bad. Not really any higher than those in the southern parts of California. Starting with the first tank of Arizona gas I had problems with the fuel pump ceasing to pump if parked for only a short time when the temperature was above about 80°F (i.e. starting after filling up, quick run into a store, etc.). Problem disappeared on the first tank of California gas. Only time I've had that issue in California has been after long (>60 min) high speed (60 MPH) drives when the temperature was 100°F or more. Certainly not on short drives with 80°F temps. I did a little research on the topic and found that one of the things that makes the California blend of gas different and more expensive is that there are tighter specifications on volatility. Turns out that is a good thing for a carbureted engine on a warm day.

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Here in Long Island, New York, where I am from , we have ONLY this garbage ethanol gas.... N O options.....

    With garbage ethanol gas, what is important and critical is

Carburetor Kit and Fuel Pump Kit in ethanol gas compatible material.....

You WILL need them ultimately....

    I deal with both, fortunately, depending on your vehicle.....

 

    Always best to simply call me --- Craig --- 516 - 485 - 1935....

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Matt's comments are spot-on.

 

Replace components as necessary.

 

Even allowing non-ethanol fuel of today to sit in the tank for longer than 8 weeks is a bad idea. The best solution is to simply drive the car more often ;) 

 

Jon

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