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1922 Buick touring Floorboard rework


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I thought I would just photograph my efforts to rework the running boards on my 1922 model 45.  I removed all trim pieces first.  I started with the moulded pieces around the shifter, pedals and accelerator etc.  Then I removed the "T" shaped trim around the edges of each piece of the floorboard.  These "T" trim pieces were attached with small cut nails that were driven through the trim pieces as they were originally installed.  I found it interesting that there was a piece of thin paper still in place between each T trim piece and the linoleum.  I would assume that these were left over from the original build process.  Maybe the floorboard pieces with the linoleum glued to them, were wrapped in paper for scratch protection as the edge trim was added during the build process.  Maybe that paper was also protection on the assembly line and delivery??

 

 The nasty old linoleum was definitely glued in place.  There were no small nails holding the  linoleum in place around the outer edges.  After stripping the linoleum I sanded the wood pieces to get the tops smooth. 

 

I also cut out a couple more areas on the top of the first toe board to accommodate the additional battery cables associated with  the battery cutoff switch I added on the firewall.

 

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There were several floor boards with support strips nailed underneath. I could see a bit of warping on one of the boards also.  I decided to drill through the running boards and support strips to countersink and install some #10 countersunk bolts to ensure they were solid floorboards.

 

Then I cut each piece of linoleum to fit exactly. The linoleum cut easily by following the directions.  I cut Each piece by scoring a couple of times with a sharp knife on the underside (The side where the burlap is glued).  Then I bent the linoleum towards the front side and the pieces broke cleanly.

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Altho I don't have a 1922-45 Buick,   I find your work interesting.    I find the key lock on the gear shaft different.   Is this common during the 20's Buick's ?    I have a 35-58 (Vicky) and a 38-46s that keep me busy.   

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 I used vinyl floor adhesive to glue the linoleum to the floorboard pieces.  The small notched trowel is recommended and seemed to work well.  I worked to try and lay the linoleum so that I did not have to move it once contact is made.  After laying the linoleum down I used a rubber roller that I had to roll the linoleum in place to help ensure good contact is made everywhere.

 

Then after completing all four pieces, I laid them on the floor face down and placed a bunch of paint cans etc to keep some pressure on the linoleum until dry.

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Jim,

 

Thanks and I'm glad you enjoy my posts. 

 

I believe that the locked gearshift was not a standard in the early 20's but I believe it became a standard in some later 1920's (1925-1927?).  Those locks were built-in at the floorboard.  This particular one was an aftermarket add-on made by Johnson Automobile Lock Company.  It works well I believe.  It keeps the key in the tumbler in the un-locked position however so you have to lock it to remove the key.  I thought that was a bit strange.

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Mark, 

    My 1925 Buick Standard has the factory transmission lock.  The down side is that it only locks in neutral.  OK if you live where there are no hills.  I would prefer if it let you lock it in a gear, but it won't.  Will yours let you lock in a gear or only neutral as well?     Hugh

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Took my first swag at trimming the toe board.  I placed the first two boards in the car to check the fit and I was pleased.  Now on to attaching the molded covers and attaching the toe board  so I can fit the second section. 

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Well I’m almost done, just a few thinks to finish up and also put linoleum on the side pieces.  I’m happy with the way the T trim came out.

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Mark,

That’s really coming out nice. Where did you get that linoleum, and what color is it exactly?

It’s hard to tell by pictures and/or lighting, but it appears very close to my 18’s — which is 50 years old at this point.

Terry W. showed how he cleaned up his 50 year old linoleum with floor cleaner and then waxed it. His was a darker shade though and I’ve had in the back of my mind, “My luck I’ll try that and end up with a ‘clean spot’ and be unable to match the rest.” I can just see it too, good to have a backup plan.

Thanks,

Ben

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     The linoleum is a uniform color thru to the burlap.  1/8" to 3/16".  You could try sanding a spot to remove any staining if it has not soaked in.  It is also not very expensive or difficult to replace.  Think gym locker in color.       

 

    This is a photo of the original T mold that was used for the floor boards in the 1925 Buick.   It is not extruded, but rather formed, but looks essentially the same when installed.  Photo courtesy of Leif.  

 

 

 

T molding 20s Buick Floorboards.jpg

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3 hours ago, Mark Kikta said:

Aussiebuick,

 

Here are a couple of cross sections before and after replacing T trim.  Is that what you want to see?

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Nice work! 

 

In my opinion you should avoid Philips head screws.  I know they won't show, but you could just as easily use new slotted head screws to be more authentic and if you ever did pull up the floors the hardware would appear more correct to others. 

 

Just my opinion! 

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27donb,

The guy who came up with those blasted phillips head screws should be taken down to the river and have his %#$@ cut off.  Worthless, absolutely worthless,  and the driver cams out and you have an ugly mess to start over with.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

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Today I finished my front floor. I found tacks where the side pieces were tacked to the wood so I did the same.  I used screws on the pieces outboard of the toe boards.

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1 hour ago, Mark Kikta said:

Today I finished my front floor. I found tacks where the side pieces were tacked to the wood so I did the same.  I used screws on the pieces outboard of the toe boards.

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Wow!  Do mine next! 

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  • 5 months later...

Hello, great tips and excellent details during your rebuilds.  I, as well, have a 22/45. Most of my wood is either rotted or entirely missing altogether. I searched to no avail.  What type of wood was used by Buick and also were the floor trim pieces original with the car or did you have to manufacture them?     

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Hi,  my foorboards were all original and were very solid.  I did install some countersunk bolts on the braces in place under the boards for extra strength.  I know the wood is pretty hard.  I was told that they often used ash in these bodies but I never explored what kind of wood they were made of.  I just cleaned up and sanded these originals and rebuilt them with new linoleum and new trim.

 

Mark

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Here are the measurements I took of my boards to order the linoleum pieces.  I read through some of my notes that I saved from different places and  others have said they could also be made from Oak or even pine.  It was said in some notes that I found, that they used scrap lumber to cut floorboards of whatever material they had available.  Not sure if that is really true or not.

 

1.      Rear section                        29”  wide x 6 7/8” deep

2.     3rd section from front       29” wide x 9 ½” deep

3.     2nd section from front       29” wide x 8 ¼” deep

4.     Front section                       29” wide x 4 3/8” deep

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Attached is a link to help you with your floor and running boards.  My boards were missing as well.  Ash was used where sheetmetal was attached with nails.  Easy to drive the small nails.  For floor and running boards, I like using Oak.  It is a little stiffer than pine (which is also a good choice) and it is easy to acquire locally.  It does require predrilling of the holes for screws.  Hugh

 

https://forums.aaca.org/topic/324627-floor-board-and-running-board-mid-20s-buick-details/?tab=comments#comment-1861441

 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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