Selim

Restoring gas tanks

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On 4/23/2020 at 9:12 AM, Selim said:


should I leave vinegar for 24 hours?  How long should I leave it inside tank ?

I personally would not use vinegar or anything water based. I have high pressured washed the inside of some tanks some times but do it in the summer with a hot sunny day to get all of the water / moisture out. Tanks naturally condense water in certain weather conditions. The fuller you keep a tank with fuel, The less condensation you will get. Dandy Dave.

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Quote,

"Instead, use a common vacuum cleaner.  Insert a long vacuum wand or hose deep into the fuel filler or sending unit opening, and turn the vacuum on. It will draw in air that's the same temperature as the tank itself. Air will enter through the remaining openings in the tank -- the filler pipe, drain plug hole and sending unit opening. Then just walk away. Absent a rainy day, the tank will dry in no time -- typically a half hour or so. " 🤯

 

 You may not have to walk away if there are any gas fumes in the tank, when they hit the electric motor, you will be blown away.

 Use the exhaust hose instead of the vacuum!

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The ONLY way to properly clean and evaluate a 80 year old gas tank is to cut it open. We regularly cut the top of the tanks open and sand blast them so we can determine if the tank or the baffles are structurally sound. Often times there are Pitts 2/3 of the way through the entire bottom, which means a new tank or a half patch is required. Shortcuts on tanks never pay, and you problems will never end. If the tanks is not terrible some of the modern tanks renew services are fine. Most of the time we just make a new tank. While expensive, it’s usually the best solution. We can then convert the sending unit to a modern and accurate sending unit that only costs 25 dollars. Try finding a decent used unit for a Cadillac or Packard.....almost impossible, and very expensive. On total restorations, we don’t test radiators or inspect gas tanks, we install new ones regardless of cost.........it’s the only correct solution.

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Posted (edited)

Back in the 1980's the Corvair club had an exploding vacuum cleaner competition. One of the members was evacuating a fuel tank with a vacuum clean that used a brush and armature motor that used the exiting air to cool the motor. He wrote an article and the competition was the next logical step. http://clubs.hemmings.com/nvce/VacuumCleanerContest.html

 

I was a member of the national Corvair club at the time, but I didn't want to risk losing my Electrolux emblems. I needed them for the '62 Electra 4 door convertible I had built.

 

When I want to do a job like that or move something heavy I go up to the convenient store and wait for a likely looking couple of guys to drive in and offer them 20 bucks.

William Sanderson

 

 

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, Dandy Dave said:

I personally would not use vinegar or anything water based. I have high pressured washed the inside of some tanks some times but do it in the summer with a hot sunny day to get all of the water / moisture out. Tanks naturally condense water in certain weather conditions. The fuller you keep a tank with fuel, The less condensation you will get. Dandy Dave.

y not vinegar? would it help by any mean get the rust out? vinegar without water I mean?

 

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Posted (edited)

No. I would not use vinegar. As I said before, vinegar will not cut the gun and varnish.   Edinmass is right. Often the only solution is a new tank. I've cut some apart myself and sandblasted the insides and made patches. If you make the patch out of copper and then solder them with lead to the steel you have just created a battery. Eventually that will eat at the tank also. Nothing is really better than the amount of Galvanize that was originally on the metal when the tank was made. Some tanks I have had from tractors are still like new inside even after 90 or 100 years because the Galvanize coating was nice and thick. Dandy Dave!  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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Up around here we have those cottage industries where people with skills practice their crafts.

 

Three old gals make some good fuel system treatment. I think one is a shirt tail relative.

Macbeth/Witches/Cauldron (608330) Framed Prints, Wall Art, Posters

 

A guy down near the lake makes his own brand penetrating oil and pretty good horseradish.

 

Vinegar? Never tried that.

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Does anyone have that video of the exploding vacuum cleaner contest ?  It would be great digitize and post to You tube...

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2 hours ago, Dandy Dave said:

No. I would not use vinegar. As I said before, vinegar will not cut the gun and varnish.   Edinmass is right. Often the only solution is a new tank. I've cut some apart myself and sandblasted the insides and made patches. If you make the patch out of copper and then solder them with lead to the steel you have just created a battery. Eventually that will eat at the tank also. Nothing is really better than the amount of Galvanize that was originally on the metal when the tank was made. Some tanks I have had from tractors are still like new inside even after 90 or 100 years because the Galvanize coating was nice and thick. Dandy Dave!  

 

When I had a new tank made for my '15 truck because the old one was rusted beyond repair, I had the new one zinc hot dipped.  It turned out looking just like an original tank and will not rust anywhere anymore.  Could have had a stainless steel tank made, but would not look correct and with the hot zinc dip, both would outlast me.

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